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  2386   Sun Aug 11 01:22:04 2019 Shalika SinghNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of voltage regulator using SR785 Spectrum Analyser

A comparison between the types of voltage regulators was done in order to know which should be preferred to provide a clean bias supply.

Attachment 1: The Circuit Diagram of the voltage regulator 

Tere are 3 types of voltage regulators that were tested. 

a. LM317

b. LM7915

c. LM7815

Attachment 2: Output Voltage noise of all 3 voltage regulators

A voltage of 12V(+/-) was provided using SR560 to the respective input of the regulator IC and the output noise across each were measured using the SR785.

LM317 will be a better choice to make a voltage regulator for the circuit mentioned in elog entry 2381.

Attachment 1: regulator.pdf
regulator.pdf
Attachment 2: Noise_across_Voltage_Regulator_Circuit.pdf
Noise_across_Voltage_Regulator_Circuit.pdf
  2387   Sun Aug 11 14:35:41 2019 KojiNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of voltage regulator using SR785 Spectrum Analyser

Questions:

1) Has the DC output voltages of the regulators checked?

2) What's the target voltages of the regulator circuits? And how the voltages were supplied from the power supply port of the SR560? 7815 is the regulator meant for +15V and 7915 is for -15V. So the input voltages need to have at least 3V larger voltages than the target voltages (like +18V for 7815, -18V for 7915). If the +/-12V are naitvely applied, the regulators don't reach the operating point.
Check "Voltage Drop" descriptions in the data sheets of the regulator chips.

3) What's the purpose of these diodes? I believe they are for the regulator protection against the transient sign flip during power switching etc as well as over voltageprotection. The circuit of the 7915 has the larger potential difference (like -18V) while the output has -15V. This means the diode will always be on. If this is just a typo in the figure, it's not a big deal. If this is the real situation, it is a big problem.

4) Why were there such huge 60Hz lines? Was the SR560 properly operated with its battery?

  2388   Sun Aug 11 19:15:32 2019 Shalika SinghNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of voltage regulator using SR785 Spectrum Analyser

Answers:

1. For LM317 I received the output of 11.2V and for LM7915 -10V and for LM7815 at 10.4V

2. I did a mistake with the supply. Next time I won't use SR560 and will use a voltage supply instead. 

3. The diode is for protection purpose. How should I use the diode for 7915, should I put it in forward bias or not use it at all?

4. I did check the voltage supply provided by SR560 using a multimeter, they were 12V.

Quote:

Questions:

1) Has the DC output voltages of the regulators checked?

2) What's the target voltages of the regulator circuits? And how the voltages were supplied from the power supply port of the SR560? 7815 is the regulator meant for +15V and 7915 is for -15V. So the input voltages need to have at least 3V larger voltages than the target voltages (like +18V for 7815, -18V for 7915). If the +/-12V are naitvely applied, the regulators don't reach the operating point.
Check "Voltage Drop" descriptions in the data sheets of the regulator chips.

3) What's the purpose of these diodes? I believe they are for the regulator protection against the transient sign flip during power switching etc as well as over voltageprotection. The circuit of the 7915 has the larger potential difference (like -18V) while the output has -15V. This means the diode will always be on. If this is just a typo in the figure, it's not a big deal. If this is the real situation, it is a big problem.

4) Why were there such huge 60Hz lines? Was the SR560 properly operated with its battery?

 

  2389   Sun Aug 11 22:34:50 2019 KojiNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of voltage regulator using SR785 Spectrum Analyser

3. You need to flip the direction of the diode.

1&2 OK, so the circuits were not fucntioning. Use a dual voltage supply (in a proper cascading setting) and give +/-18V.

4. When you use SR560 as a power supply, you need to disconnect the AC power supply. Otherwise, the AC power, which charges the +/-12V lead battery, contaminates the output voltage with the 60Hz lines.

  2390   Mon Aug 12 11:37:36 2019 Shalika SinghNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of Circuit using SR785 Spectrum Analyser and Zero Simulation

Referring to elog entry 2385. I did the measurements again because mistakingly I had been using the SR560 with it's AC supply on. This time I used the 12V supply with no connection to the AC supply.

Attachment 1: The Circuit Diagram TIA

>>  the TIA with a gain of 5.1k

Attachment 2: Input Referred noise of TIA 

The input-referred current noise across the TIA was measured using SR785 and was compared against the graph obtained from ZERO simulation.

Attachment 3: Differential Circuit

>> gain of 100

Attachment 4: Input Referred noise of Differential Circuit

The input-referred voltage noise measured using SR785 and was compared against the graph obtained from ZERO simulation. 

Attachment 5: Whitening Filter Circuit

>> gain of 10

Attachment 6: Input Referred noise of Whitening Filter Circuit

The input-referred voltage noise was measured using SR785 and was compared against the graph obtained from ZERO simulation.

Attachment 7: The Scripts

All the scripts and data used in the measurement.

** I did notice a reduction in 60Hz harmonics but I still see a deviation from simulated results at higher frequencies and at frequencies below 10Hz.

Attachment 1: TIA.png
TIA.png
Attachment 2: Noise_across_TIA.pdf
Noise_across_TIA.pdf
Attachment 3: Differential_Circuit.png
Differential_Circuit.png
Attachment 4: Noise_across_Differential_Circuit.pdf
Noise_across_Differential_Circuit.pdf
Attachment 5: Whitening_Filter.png
Whitening_Filter.png
Attachment 6: Noise_across_Whitening_Filter.pdf
Noise_across_Whitening_Filter.pdf
Attachment 7: Noise.zip
  2391   Mon Aug 12 11:51:38 2019 Shalika SinghNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of Voltage Regulator using SR785 Spectrum Analyser

Referring to elog entry QIL:2387. I did the correction with the voltage supply and now provided a supply of 18V(+/-) to LM7815 and LM7915. The position of diodes was also corrected for LM7915. The Electrolytic Capacitors(100uf) I am using are getting heated when using with LM7915 only. I didn't find any tantalum capacitors of 100uf in EE shop. Should they be replaced with some other capacitors?

Attachment 1: The Circuit Diagram Voltage regulator

The component used                   Input Voltage                              Output Voltage

a. LM7915                                    -18 V                                  -15.1 V

b. LM7815                                    18 V                                    14.86 V

c. LM317                                      18 V                                    17 V      

Attachment 2: Output Voltage noise of regulator circuit

The noise observed using SR785 at the output of each regulator.

 

Attachment 1: regulator.pdf
regulator.pdf
Attachment 2: Noise_across_Voltage_Regulator_Circuit.pdf
Noise_across_Voltage_Regulator_Circuit.pdf
  2392   Mon Aug 12 12:09:00 2019 Nathan HollandSummary2micronLasersAdjusting the Voltage/Frequency Offset on the Brimrose AOM Driver.

The 80 MHz brimrose AOM driver, which came with the AOM, can actually drive between 75 MHz and 85 MHz. It has an input port, which accepts between 0V and 10V, for altering the frequency.

 

Previously, before Friday 2019-08-09, I had set the offset to + 5V, using a signal generator because that was what was available in the QIL lab. The signal generator, for some unclear reason, had then moved this offset to +4.4 V, when plugged into the AOM driver. Attachment 1 shows a power spectrum, from the BB PD, One notices a large peak negatively detuned from the 80 MHz signal frequency. Attachement 2 shows a zoom in, around 70 MHz, revealing this peak to be two peaks, one near 78 MHz, and another smaller one near 79 MHz.

I decided to adjust the voltage, input to the frequency port, to minimise the RF sidebands I observed. The results of this adjustment can be seen in attachments 3, and 4. Notice that there no observable sidebands. This was achieved with an offset of 4.52V.

 

Attachement 5 is the manual for the AOM, and its driver. (Removed by KA)

Attachment 1: 2um_MachZehnder_wide_PowerSpectrum_Screenshot.png
2um_MachZehnder_wide_PowerSpectrum_Screenshot.png
Attachment 2: 2um_MachZehnder_narrow_PowerSpectrum_Screenshot.png
2um_MachZehnder_narrow_PowerSpectrum_Screenshot.png
Attachment 3: 2um_MachZehnder_wide_PowerSpectrum_adjusted_Screenshot.png
2um_MachZehnder_wide_PowerSpectrum_adjusted_Screenshot.png
Attachment 4: 2um_MachZehnder_narrow_PowerSpectrum_adjusted_Screenshot.png
2um_MachZehnder_narrow_PowerSpectrum_adjusted_Screenshot.png
  2393   Mon Aug 12 15:17:05 2019 KojiNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of Voltage Regulator using SR785 Spectrum Analyser

1. Heat: Check the polarity of the electrolytic or tantalum caps. 

2. Add 0.1uF high-K ceramic caps in pararel to these electrolytic or tantalum caps.

3. Why does LM317 have only one volt drop? It requires minimum 3V mergin between the input and output voltages. (See the datasheet) 

 

  2394   Tue Aug 13 16:53:57 2019 Nathan HollandElectronics2micronLasersPhase Noise of Brimrose AOM Driver (VCO).

After reviewing the Brimrose AOM driver mnual, yesterday, it turns out I was previously using it incorrectly. It is a VCO with the frequency port accepting a DC voltage, between 0 and 10 V to control the frequency of the AOM - note that the mapping is not intuitive so one should refer to the manual. The modulation port is used for amplitude modulation, not frequency modulation. This port, modulation, has 50 ohm input impedance and accepts signals between DC and 10 MHz - modulating the power output. Table 1 below shows the operating parameters we should use:

Table 1: Recommended, constant, operating procedures for Brimrose AOM driver.
Port Value (V) Comments
Frequency +9.08 Gives 80 MHz modulation frequency.
Modulation +0.85 Gives 27 dBm of RF output, which is 90% of the maximum linear range of the Brimrose AOM.

 

Following this I characterised the phase noise of this VCO. Results are shown in attachment 1, for various powers. The setup is shown in figure 2, with the data for M = +0.85 V provided in attachment 3. These results show that this VCO has poor phase performance. A value of M = +0.02 V gives the same RF power as when a 0.5 Vpp signal @ 80 MHz was input into the modulation port - as I was previously doing.

This has a few implications for previous measurements:

  • The reason it was hard for the Mach Zehnder to remain locked for a substantial duration was due to the low input power to the AOM. This probably resulted in little signal in the Mach Zehnder LO arm.
  • Previously the amplitude modulation would have provided a 80 MHz signal in the Mach Zehnder LO arm

 

The script used to create the smoothed ASD can be found here.

Attachment 1: 20190813__Brimrose_AOM_Driver_phase_noise.pdf
20190813__Brimrose_AOM_Driver_phase_noise.pdf
Attachment 2: 20190813__VCO_phase_noise_setup.pdf
20190813__VCO_phase_noise_setup.pdf
Attachment 3: brimrose_AOM_driver_VCO_phase_noise_spectra.hdf5
  2395   Tue Aug 13 17:59:25 2019 Nathan HollandNoise Budget2micronLasersPhase Noise of Mach Zehnder with VCO.

Following up from my previous post I measured the phase noise of the Mach Zehnder setup with the AOM driven properly with its VCO. The setup is shown in attachment 1, and compressed data in attachment 2 (goto here to get the python library to decompress this data). The value of M for this data shown is +0.85 V, though I have data for other voltages - however it should affect the performance. Using the low frequency preview I was able to see that I would need to coherently subtract the phase measurements of both measurements, which restricted me to a maximum sampling frequency of 15 kHz.

The measured data is shown in attachment 3. Already you can see that the phase noise of the VCO limits the measured phase from the IFO. This also tells me that previously, when I was modulating the VCO, the AM was affecting the measured phase. When I convert this difference into frequency noise the result can be seen in attachment 4. One upside of this setup is that the signal from the IFO is much more robust, so the PLL can stay locked for longer. This is a consquency of increased drive, 24 dB more, on the AOM.

To me this demonstrates that the way forward is to replace the VCO driving the AOM with a RF amplifier, driven by a low noise (or lower noise) signal generator. The Moku is able to drive at 80 MHz. We have a Mini Circuits ZHL-5W-1 (ZHL--5W) amplifier in the laboratory. This has 46.4 dB of gain, and a maximum power output of 37 dBm. The maximum power that can be input into the AOM is 27.8 dBm (0.6 W). Thus with an appropriate setup this miniciruits amplifier should be a viable repalcement for the current VCO.

Attachment 1: 20190813__Phase_Noise_Measurement_VCO_setup.pdf
20190813__Phase_Noise_Measurement_VCO_setup.pdf
Attachment 2: MachZehnder_w_AOM_Driver_085_20190813_102449.li
Attachment 3: 20190813__MachZehnder_w_VCO-phase_noise.pdf
20190813__MachZehnder_w_VCO-phase_noise.pdf
Attachment 4: 20190813__MachZehnder_w_VCO-frequency_noise.pdf
20190813__MachZehnder_w_VCO-frequency_noise.pdf
  2396   Tue Aug 13 19:03:05 2019 Shalika SinghNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of Voltage Regulator Circuit using SR785 Spectrum Analyzer

As it was observed that normal voltage supply is noisy and not suitable for our circuit, we plan to use a voltage regulator that will help us provide a clean supply. Referring to previous elog entries the corresponding corrections were made( polarity of electrolytic capacitors, ceramic cap in parallel to electrolytic, 3V difference between input and output of respective regulators).

Attachment 1: The Circuit Diagram of Voltage regulator

The component used                   Input Voltage                              Output Voltage

a. LM7915                                    -18 V                                  -15.1 V

b. LM7815                                    18 V                                    14.86 V

c. LM317                                      18 V                                   14.96 V      

Attachment 2: Output Voltage noise of regulator circuit

The noise observed using SR785 at the output of each regulator is shown. It clearly shows that LM317 manifests less noise in comparison to LM7915 and LM7815. It will be therefore a good idea to use this to provide 15V bias in our circuit.

Attachment 3: The Scripts

Find all the scripts and data used in this measurement.

Attachment 1: regulator.pdf
regulator.pdf
Attachment 2: Noise_across_Voltage_Regulator.pdf
Noise_across_Voltage_Regulator.pdf
Attachment 3: regulator.zip
  2398   Wed Aug 14 16:07:57 2019 Nathan HollandDailyProgress2micronLasersNew AOM Driver.

After reproting phase noise issues with the VCO, here, I have changed the VCO for a high power RF amplifier - a mini circuits ZHL--5W==sma (ZHL-5W-1). It is being driven by thre Moku to provide the 80 MHz signal. Please note the following:

  • This is a high power amplifier so you should follow the correct high power amplifier turn on/off procedure.
  • The amplifier can output a maximum of 5W. However the AOM can only tolerate a maximum of 0.6 W. Ensure that an appropriately small signal is input into the amplifier, as to not break the AOM.

 

The new setup is shown in attachment 1. Attachment 2 show the phase noise of the LO arm. This is now a much more acceptable level, as compared to the previous VCO. I am outputting -19.2 dBm, and measuring 5.3 dBm on input 2. This means I am driving the AOM at 24.8 dBm, or 0.302 W.

 

With the greater drive on the AOM, as compared to previous incorrect useage of the VCO, the signal from the IFO arm is much more robust. Attachment 3 shows the phase time series of the IFO arm. You will notice the large jumps, which spoil the spectrum, not shown here. In attachment 4 I zoom into the largest of these jumps. You can see it is comprised of several linear transitions, which occur over a short time period.

 

Aidan has suggested that locking the laser is the best way to avoide these non-stationary noise sources. He suggests that these jumps could be mode hops of the laser.

Attachment 1: 20190814__Phase_Noise_Setup.pdf
20190814__Phase_Noise_Setup.pdf
Attachment 2: MachZehnder_measured_phase_noise-LO_path__20190814.pdf
MachZehnder_measured_phase_noise-LO_path__20190814.pdf
Attachment 3: MachZehnder_measured_phase-IFO_path__20190814.pdf
MachZehnder_measured_phase-IFO_path__20190814.pdf
Attachment 4: MachZehnder_measured_phase-IFO_path_zoom__20190814.pdf
MachZehnder_measured_phase-IFO_path_zoom__20190814.pdf
  2399   Wed Aug 14 19:50:37 2019 Shalika SinghNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise analysis of Sallen Key filter using SR785 and Zero simulation

The photodiode needs a 1V bias so for a clean bias we have decided to use a sallen key low pass filter with a cut off frequency at 1Hz. The quality factor of the designed sallen key filter is 0.707.

Attachment 1: The Circuit Diagram of Sallen Key filter

The gain of the circuit is 1. 

Attachment 2: The transfer function of the filter

We can see the cut off frequency at 1Hz

Attachment 3: The Input Referred Noise of filter

The input-referred voltage noise was obtained using SR785 and compared with zero simulation. It deviates a lot from the simulated results by a factor of 100.

Attachment 4: Scripts

Find all the data and scripts used for the measurements.

NOTE: Noise plot below had inconsistent units; please ignore.

 

Attachment 1: sallenkeyfilter.pdf
sallenkeyfilter.pdf
Attachment 2: Transfer_function_of_sallen_key.pdf
Transfer_function_of_sallen_key.pdf
Attachment 3: Noise_across_SallenKey.pdf
Noise_across_SallenKey.pdf
Attachment 4: sallenkey.zip
  2400   Thu Aug 15 02:30:29 2019 KojiSummary2micronLasersInAsSb PDs accomodated in PD housings / PD cables

InAsSb PDs were housed in the PD cages. The cages were engraved to indicate the batch (Sb3512 or 3513) and the serials (A1, A2, ...).

The PD legs does not have an indicator for the pin1. So, the tab of the PD case is directed "UP". Also the direction of the tab is marked on the cage. The tab of the short plug was also aligned to Pin1. However, the PD case is too thin and the PDs can rotate in the cases.
So the face photo was also taken so that it indicates how Pin 1 looks like from the PD face. (Attachment 4)


Also made the cable for the LaserComponents PD and the InAsSb PD. Pin n shows up as Pin n of DB9 Male connector.

Once we have the PD test is the bias circuit (with a monitor) and some patch panel kind of preparation, we can start working on the PD test.

Attachment 1: P_20190814_214159.jpg
P_20190814_214159.jpg
Attachment 2: P_20190814_214537.jpg
P_20190814_214537.jpg
Attachment 3: P_20190814_215119.jpg
P_20190814_215119.jpg
Attachment 4: P_20190814_215158.jpg
P_20190814_215158.jpg
Attachment 5: P_20190814_220035.jpg
P_20190814_220035.jpg
Attachment 6: P_20190814_220553_003.jpg
P_20190814_220553_003.jpg
Attachment 7: P_20190814_220832.jpg
P_20190814_220832.jpg
Attachment 8: P_20190814_220841.jpg
P_20190814_220841.jpg
Attachment 9: P_20190814_235137.jpg
P_20190814_235137.jpg
  2401   Thu Aug 15 08:03:13 2019 ranaNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of Voltage Regulator Circuit using SR785 Spectrum Analyzer
I'm glad to see that the voltage regulators can give good noise performance. I wish I understood what the gain peaking features came from - maybe the choice of capacitors?
  2402   Thu Aug 15 08:36:29 2019 ShalikaNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of Voltage Regulator Circuit using SR785 Spectrum Analyzer

I found only 1uF Tanatalum Capacitors in the EE shop. Maybe a a higher capacitance of tantalum capacitor will help. 

 

Another thing, is it good to compare the input referred noise for the different types of regulators? I did a comparison between the output noise only. 

Quote:
I'm glad to see that the voltage regulators can give good noise performance. I wish I understood what the gain peaking features came from - maybe the choice of capacitors?

 

  2404   Fri Aug 16 01:28:28 2019 KojiSummary2micronLasersSwitchable breakout bok

DB9 switchable breakout box is ready. We are ready to do some PD test now.

Attachment 1: P_20190815_210355.jpg
P_20190815_210355.jpg
Attachment 2: P_20190815_210419.jpg
P_20190815_210419.jpg
  2407   Fri Aug 23 12:45:08 2019 Shalika SinghNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of Circuit using SR785 Spectrum Analyser and Zero Simulation

The circuit has been soldered(refer entries 2399) and the noise for Sallen Key was analyzed

Attachment 1: Circuit Diagram of Sallen Key low pass filter( cut-off= 1Hz)

Attachment 2: Transfer Function of sallen key.  The Frequency response Measurement was done using the Swept Sine group. The input range was -50dBVpk.

Attachment 3: Noise comparison between zero and SR785 measurements. The noise matches the simulated results to a great extent and also it's less noisy so can successfully be used to bias the photodiodes(1V).

Attachment 4: Zip File

Attachment 1: sallenkeyfilter.pdf
sallenkeyfilter.pdf
Attachment 2: bodeplot_sallenkey.pdf
bodeplot_sallenkey.pdf
Attachment 3: Noise_across_SallenKey.pdf
Noise_across_SallenKey.pdf
Attachment 4: sallen.zip
  2408   Fri Aug 23 14:15:58 2019 DuoNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of Circuit using SR785 Spectrum Analyser and Zero Simulation

I think this is a solid measurement.

Quote:

The circuit has been soldered(refer entries 2399) and the noise for Sallen Key was analyzed

Attachment 1: Circuit Diagram of Sallen Key low pass filter( cut-off= 1Hz)

Attachment 2: Transfer Function of sallen key0

Attachment 3: Noise comparison between zero and SR785 measurements. The noise matches the simulated results to a great extent and also it's less noisy so can successfully be used to bias the photodiodes(1V)

Attachment 4: Zip File

 

  2409   Fri Aug 23 17:35:37 2019 KojiNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of Circuit using SR785 Spectrum Analyser and Zero Simulation

The TF looks good. But the noise measurement is obviously limited by the SR785 noise. We need a preamp, which is only for the purpose of the measurement. It has to have the input reffered noise about a factor of a few better than the noise predicted by Zero. At high frequency, probably we will be able to use SR560. With this low noise level, probably we can just use the flat gain of 100 for the SR560 setting. This will give you the input referred noise (of the preamp) of  ~4nV/rtHz at kHz band. Note that the gain needs to be larger than 100 to have low noiseness of SR560.

Quote:

I think this is a solid measurement.

 

  2411   Wed Aug 28 21:25:20 2019 Shalika SinghNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Bump observed at 8kHz during TIA noise analysis

The noise analysis for TIA was done. The circuit was in open but kept away from SR785 (to avoid any noise effect)

Attachment 1 and 2 show how the setup was placed. The wires were kept in a way that there is no tension. The wires that were used for connection from the voltage supply were twisted in order to avoid any inductance issue. The input range was kept at -44BVpk (this was maintained at all points when taking measurements with SR560) while using the SR785. SR560 was used with a flat gain of 100 in order to get above the noise of SR785 and also the AC coupling was used. LM317 and LM337 were used to provide a 15V(+/-) supply to OpAmp. The OpAmp used here is Op27. 

Attachment 3 shows the noise analysis across TIA(using Op27). It was observed that the voltage regulators help in noise reduction to a great extent at low frequencies but somehow at around 8kHz, a huge noise bump is being observed. I also checked the noise by using directly the voltage supply at the lab. It does impart high noise at low frequencies but it's clearly visible that noise bump at 8kHz isn't there. The noise bump exists only when the voltage regulators are being used with the OpAmp. I did check if the output of voltage regulators were oscillating due to some reason but they provided a constant output of 15.04V(+/-).  I did check if the OpAmp was broken but it isn't the case because the difference between the voltage at pin 2 and 3 is zero, I have two TIA on my board so I checked the noise for both of them and I observed the same results.

Attachment 4 shows the noise of TIA using LT1792. It was seen that the 8kHz noise bump is evident on even changing the OpAmp. 

I am unable to understand how is this issue coming up. I did the measurement quite a few times just to be sure It's not a one-time thing but the noise bump is dominant. 

Attachment 5: Zip

 

 

 

Attachment 1: circuit.jpg
circuit.jpg
Attachment 2: circuit_setup.jpg
circuit_setup.jpg
Attachment 3: Noise_across_TIA_op27.pdf
Noise_across_TIA_op27.pdf
Attachment 4: Noise_across_TIA_LT1792.pdf
Noise_across_TIA_LT1792.pdf
Attachment 5: TIA.zip
  2412   Thu Aug 29 15:36:49 2019 KojiNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Bump observed at 8kHz during TIA noise analysis

You need to check the voltage noise of the regulator outputs with the opamps connected. Probably you did it. If so, it is a riddle why the 8kHz bump is not observed in the regulator outputs, but is in the opamp outputs...

Does the noise bump happen with the +/-15V supplied by 7815/7915? How about to change the capacitor values for LM317/337 to the ones recommended in the data sheet?

It is great to see the noise peaks were largely reduced by LT1792. This is what I found before although I can't explain why.

  2413   Fri Aug 30 05:11:11 2019 ChrisNoise Budget2micronLasersNoise Analysis of Voltage Regulator Circuit using SR785 Spectrum Analyzer

In case we need to seek a further reduction in the voltage regulator noise, Wenzel has kindly published their ideas for a little noise-eating circuit at the regulator output.

 

Quote:

As it was observed that normal voltage supply is noisy and not suitable for our circuit, we plan to use a voltage regulator that will help us provide a clean supply. Referring to previous elog entries the corresponding corrections were made( polarity of electrolytic capacitors, ceramic cap in parallel to electrolytic, 3V difference between input and output of respective regulators).

Attachment 1: The Circuit Diagram of Voltage regulator

The component used                   Input Voltage                              Output Voltage

a. LM7915                                    -18 V                                  -15.1 V

b. LM7815                                    18 V                                    14.86 V

c. LM317                                      18 V                                   14.96 V      

Attachment 2: Output Voltage noise of regulator circuit

The noise observed using SR785 at the output of each regulator is shown. It clearly shows that LM317 manifests less noise in comparison to LM7915 and LM7815. It will be therefore a good idea to use this to provide 15V bias in our circuit.

Attachment 3: The Scripts

Find all the scripts and data used in this measurement.

 

  2424   Mon Sep 23 23:48:12 2019 KojiUpdate2micronLasers2um sensor cards / focusing optics

Fiber Collimator (Thorlabs F028APC-2000+AD11F+LMR1) and MIR sensor cards (Thorlabs VRC6S Qty2) were delivered.

The sensor card is liquid crystal and seems temperature sensitive. It's slow and diffused. But at least we can now see 2um beams in a certain condition.

The fiber collimator seems working fine, but this gave me another issue. Now because the beam is small (w<500um) everywhere, I can't focus it very well. To make a focused beam, one needs a large beam, of course. Previously, the beam was not well focused. Therefore the final focused beam with f=150mm was sufficiently small like w=50um.

It looks like some kind of  telescope is necessary.

Attachment 1: IMG_8936.jpg
IMG_8936.jpg
  2446   Fri Nov 15 20:10:00 2019 KojiSummary2micronLasersInAsSb PD Mounts designed

LIGO-Number Title Author(s) Topic(s) Last Updated
E1900369-v1 InAsSb Photodiode Mount (Short) Assembly Koji Arai Assembly
Basic R&D
15 Nov 2019
E1900368-v1 InAsSb Photodiode Mount Assembly Koji Arai Assembly
Basic R&D
15 Nov 2019
D1900490-v1 InAsSb Photodiode Mount Face Plate Koji Arai Basic R&D 15 Nov 2019
D1900489-v1 InAsSb Photodiode Mount (short) Koji Arai Basic R&D 15 Nov 2019
D1900488-v1 InAsSb Photodiode Mount Koji Arai Basic R&D 15 Nov 2019

  2474   Tue Dec 10 16:35:03 2019 AidanLaser2micronLasersCalibrated cryo-PD REF PD output in units of power incident on cryo chamber window

We placed a power meter after the fiber collimator, 75mm focal length lens and HR mirror at 45 degrees - basically, we placed the power meter immediately before the input window to the cryo chamber after all the intervening optics from the fiber output.

For a series of laser diode current levels, we measured the power on the power meter and the corresponding voltage on the reference photodetector that is monitoring a 10% pick-off from the laser. The calibration is as follows:

Diode current (mA) REF PD (V) Laser Power (mW)
100.83 1.048 1.171
90.75 0.941 1.043
80.66 0.827 0.904
70.56 0.708 0.763
60.47 0.596 0.627
50.45 0.48 0.485
39.92 0.357 0.338
29.82 0.237 0.191
19.73 0.117 0.045
9.64 0.080 0.000
0.00 0.080 0.000

 

  2612   Wed Jul 21 13:14:11 2021 PacoLab Infrastructure2micronLasersBrimrose AOM and amplifier

Yesterday I came in the QIL and performed an express kidnapping of the 2um in fiber AOM (Brimrose) and the 5 W RF amplifier that was hooked to the RF in port (though it seems it saturates at ~ 600 mW from past elogs). I will test it with the 1419 nm ECDL fiber pickoff port to see that it works and if it doesn't I will reinstall it in the 2um testing facility.

  2640   Fri Aug 6 16:15:03 2021 PacoLab Infrastructure2micronLasersBrimrose AOM and amplifier

Also borrowed Mini-Circuits amplifier ZFL-500LN+ from same setup.

Quote:

Yesterday I came in the QIL and performed an express kidnapping of the 2um in fiber AOM (Brimrose) and the 5 W RF amplifier that was hooked to the RF in port (though it seems it saturates at ~ 600 mW from past elogs). I will test it with the 1419 nm ECDL fiber pickoff port to see that it works and if it doesn't I will reinstall it in the 2um testing facility.

 

  2675   Sun Oct 3 08:22:49 2021 AidanSummary2micronLasersStarting data taking and second test of JPL PD A1
  • Output going to JPL_PD/data/A1_test2 and DAQ
  • Test commenced at 8:20AM and cryo cooler started shortly afterwards
  • Once trhough the loop takes about 20 minutes
  • Cryocooler on at 8:42AM
  2676   Wed Oct 6 13:50:18 2021 AidanSummary2micronLasersStarting data taking and second test of JPL PD A1
  • Turned cryocooler off around 1317588441 (about 1:46PM)
  • Restarted measurement with output going to JPL_PD/data/A1_test3
  • Room is noticeably quieter without the cryocooler on.
Quote:
  • Output going to JPL_PD/data/A1_test2 and DAQ
  • Test commenced at 8:20AM and cryo cooler started shortly afterwards
  • Once trhough the loop takes about 20 minutes
  • Cryocooler on at 8:42AM

 

  2677   Thu Oct 7 08:07:03 2021 AidanSummary2micronLasersStarting data taking and second test of JPL PD A1
  • We're at 164K as of 8AM this morning.
  2678   Mon Oct 11 08:35:21 2021 AidanSummary2micronLasersStarting data taking and second test of JPL PD A1

Terminated the data taking at 8:35Am this morning. The termperature traces of the cryo chamber show a couple of discontinuities in the gradient. I don't know what the cause is,

Quote:
  • We're at 164K as of 8AM this morning.

 

Attachment 1: Screenshot_from_2021-10-11_08-36-06.png
Screenshot_from_2021-10-11_08-36-06.png
  2679   Mon Oct 18 15:25:14 2021 AidanSummary2micronLasersStarting data taking and second test of JPL PD A1

Initial running of analysis code puts the max QE at ~62 + /- 1% around 130-150K. I want to explore this temperature regime manually and see if we're saturating the PD or not.

3:30PM - Chamber is still under vacuum. Cryocooler turned back on.

Quote:

Terminated the data taking at 8:35Am this morning. The termperature traces of the cryo chamber show a couple of discontinuities in the gradient. I don't know what the cause is,

Quote:
  • We're at 164K as of 8AM this morning.

 

 

  2513   Fri Nov 6 08:14:58 2020 AidanUpdate2um PhotodiodesPhotodiode testing recovery status

Quick update, more detailed update to follow.

  • Laser is working
  • Photodiode sweep with the Keithley shows a sensible dark Current v Voltage plot (when laser is off) - indicating that PD wiring is still intact
  • Laser was aligned onto photodiode (although it took a while aligning to find the signal)
  • Ran a sweep with the Keithley and the laser on - saw another sensible bright Current v Voltage plot (more current than in the dark case)
  • DAQ control still works
  • DAC output is directly providing (unfiltered) 200mV bias

Still to do:

  • Get the SR785 plugged back in
  • Get an SR560 inserted between DAC output and PD bias to low pass filter
  • Investigate why the laser current set point is so noisy
  • Sort out RTD situation inside the chamber
  • Miscellaneous stuff
  2514   Fri Nov 6 12:45:21 2020 AidanUpdate2um PhotodiodesPhotodiode testing recovery status

Embellished Chris's PD MEDM screen a bit to illustrate controls in a diagram. The representation of the RELAY SWITCH between the Keithley and the SR560 is a bit off - I think the transimpedance amplifier is switched out as well.

Also - Keithley bright PD sweep output is attached.

Quote:

Quick update, more detailed update to follow.

  • Laser is working
  • Photodiode sweep with the Keithley shows a sensible dark Current v Voltage plot (when laser is off) - indicating that PD wiring is still intact
  • Laser was aligned onto photodiode (although it took a while aligning to find the signal)
  • Ran a sweep with the Keithley and the laser on - saw another sensible bright Current v Voltage plot (more current than in the dark case)
  • DAQ control still works
  • DAC output is directly providing (unfiltered) 200mV bias

Still to do:

  • Get the SR785 plugged back in
  • Get an SR560 inserted between DAC output and PD bias to low pass filter
  • Investigate why the laser current set point is so noisy
  • Sort out RTD situation inside the chamber
  • Miscellaneous stuff

 

Attachment 1: MEDM.png
MEDM.png
Attachment 2: PD_sweep.png
PD_sweep.png
  2516   Mon Nov 9 15:49:58 2020 AidanUpdate2um PhotodiodesJPL PD resurrection (cont.)

Okay - all the steps in the procedure of eLOG 2476 have been verified as working - with the exception of the RTDs in the chamber.

 With regards to taking dark noise spectra at different biases and temperatures, looks like Raymond took spectra with biases of [50, 100, 200, 400, 600, 1000]mV. If no objections, I’ll stick to that number of measurements. 

I’m a bit pushed for time with other stuff. I wonder if the shield RTD is sufficient to run tests on the system? I’ll go back through the data and see how reproducible the relationship between shield temperature and PD temperature is. If it is reliable then in the interests of time, I’m going to forgo re-installing the extra RTDs in the chamber just now.

 

  2517   Tue Nov 10 12:46:34 2020 AidanUpdate2um PhotodiodesJPL PD resurrection (cont.)

Looks like the temperature difference between the PD and the shield is relatively small. Even the transients when the heater is applied are order 5K. 

This means that, for quick purposes, the shield RTD is a good proxy for the PD temperature. 

The attached data is the difference between PD and shield RTD from circa 5th-6th February 2020.

Quote:

Okay - all the steps in the procedure of eLOG 2476 have been verified as working - with the exception of the RTDs in the chamber.

 With regards to taking dark noise spectra at different biases and temperatures, looks like Raymond took spectra with biases of [50, 100, 200, 400, 600, 1000]mV. If no objections, I’ll stick to that number of measurements. 

I’m a bit pushed for time with other stuff. I wonder if the shield RTD is sufficient to run tests on the system? I’ll go back through the data and see how reproducible the relationship between shield temperature and PD temperature is. If it is reliable then in the interests of time, I’m going to forgo re-installing the extra RTDs in the chamber just now.

 

 

Attachment 1: temperature_diff_shield_v_PD.png
temperature_diff_shield_v_PD.png
  2519   Tue Nov 17 17:51:44 2020 AidanUpdate2um PhotodiodesAgilis piezo mirror installed in JPL PD testing apparatus

I installed the Agilis mirror before the lens and cryo-chamber. Used the USB interface to align the beam onto the PD. So we can control the alignment remotely now (or once I’ve properly connected the USB cable instead of today’s janky test connection).
 

Attachment 1: IMG_9401.jpg
IMG_9401.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_9400.jpg
IMG_9400.jpg
  2520   Thu Nov 19 16:25:30 2020 AidanUpdate2um PhotodiodesAgilis piezo mirror installed in JPL PD testing apparatus

Here's the python code I used to control this. 

I incorrectly used the Move to Limit command ('1MV-3': axis 1, MoVe, negative direction, speed 3', where the speeds are given in the manual, see Section 4.7 in particular). Once this command is issued, the stage will keep moving until it receives the stop command. The JOG command would be more appropriate.

I confirmed a smooth change in the PD output as the beam translated across it.

Quote:

I installed the Agilis mirror before the lens and cryo-chamber. Used the USB interface to align the beam onto the PD. So we can control the alignment remotely now (or once I’ve properly connected the USB cable instead of today’s janky test connection).
 

 

Attachment 1: Screen_Shot_2020-11-19_at_4.27.17_PM.png
Screen_Shot_2020-11-19_at_4.27.17_PM.png
  2533   Wed Mar 3 16:14:18 2021 AidanUpdate2um PhotodiodesBringing 2um PD testing back online

I ran the bright PD test on the photodiode currenlty in the vacuum chamber. The test was run at air and room temperature. I aligned the 2um laser onto the PD using the piezo mirror and the readout from the preamp. I then switched to the Keithley and ran the bright scan with the "runsweep.py" script. I actually ran the scan at multiple laser diode current settings by varying the control voltage into the diode driver. The change in response wrt control voltage looks linear but I need to run an analysis on it.

The data is stored in /home/controls/JPL_PD/data/20210303_bright_scans

 

 

Attachment 1: Screen_Shot_2021-03-03_at_4.11.47_PM.png
Screen_Shot_2021-03-03_at_4.11.47_PM.png
  2534   Thu Mar 4 13:37:51 2021 AidanUpdate2um PhotodiodesReference PD reading vs Power incident on viewport

I measured the power incident on the cryo chamber viewport and the reference PD reading to calibrate the incident power. Data is attached. Power meter head = S148C.

 

Attachment 1: POW_IN_vs_REF_PD.csv
´╗┐LD,REFPD,POWER
-0.4,0.207,0.314
-0.3,0.263,0.452
-0.2,0.32,0.589
-0.1,0.373,0.719
0,0.432,0.865
0.1,0.486,0.99
0.2,0.534,1.106
0.3,0.585,1.238
0.4,0.64,1.363
... 5 more lines ...
Attachment 2: IMG_1107.jpg
IMG_1107.jpg
  2535   Thu Mar 4 16:12:26 2021 AidanHowto2um PhotodiodesJPL PD set up tutorial video

I recorded a 15 minute overview that describes the JPL PD set up and how to operate it. I'm in the process of embellishing the operation procedure (previous version can be found here: eLOG 2476).

 

  2536   Wed Mar 10 17:20:26 2021 AidanUpdate2um PhotodiodesPumped chamber down briefly - connected vacuum gauge to the computer
  • I updated the SR560 settings for the AC Photodiode readout going into the ADC. They're now: AC coupled input, 2000x gain, low noise, 10kHz pole
  • Updated the "undoSR560" filterbank for the FM31 input channel to undo the SR560 settings (zpk([0.15], [0], 7.5E-5)
  • Unhooked oscilloscope from AC channel and switched SR560 to battery mode - no change in recorded spectra. I think I need to run the FEMTO preamp from a battery pack
  • Hooked up the pumping station to the chamber and went through the pumping cycle described below. No major issues.
  • Turned on the MKS vacuum gauge and hooked it into the serial port of QIL-WS1 to readback the vacuum pressure onto the DAQ. I want to transfer this across to QIl-NFS but there are no serial ports on that machine - will have to get a USB-Serial converter.
Attachment 1: IMG_1204.jpg
IMG_1204.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_1200.jpg
IMG_1200.jpg
Attachment 3: IMG_1191.jpg
IMG_1191.jpg
Attachment 4: IMG_1190.jpg
IMG_1190.jpg
Attachment 5: IMG_1199.jpg
IMG_1199.jpg
  2538   Fri Mar 12 16:29:36 2021 AidanUpdate2um PhotodiodesVacuum needs leak checking

I pumped the small vacuum volume down but the pressure started rising as soon as I turned off the vacuum pump. Closing the main valve to the pump and the valve to the chamber did little to change the leak rate. So the main leak seems to be from the volume around the pressure gauge - best guess, the section and O-ring that I connected to the chamber yesterday.

Vacuum pressure was recorded from vacuum gauge to text file in Python (using pyserial). Haven't got this into EPICS just yet. 

Attachment 1: Screen_Shot_2021-03-12_at_4.28.54_PM.png
Screen_Shot_2021-03-12_at_4.28.54_PM.png
  2539   Tue Mar 16 18:45:43 2021 AidanDailyProgress2um PhotodiodesCryo cool down and temperature rise - JPL PD LN2 (5 hours to rise)

I pumped the chamber down and added LN2 today. The pressure was slowly rising - it was about 20m Torr in the chamber when I added the LN2. Per Raymond's instructions, I added about a third of a container of LN2. This got the temperature down to about 89K (when I had 20W running in the heater). It stayed there for about 25-30 minutes.

I turned off the heater and left the LN2 to boil off. You could see the cloud coming out of the top (the plume height would increase proportionally to the heat in the heater).

Eventually the LN2 evaporated and the shield temperature started to increase back to room temperature. As of this post it is 282K (which took about 5 hours).

The PD thermistor is not currently registering. However, the temperature of the PD can be inferred from the shield temperature (see aLOG 2517).

The rate of increase in temperature was much faster than the previous test - see second time series. I wonder if the thermal mass of the shields in the Feb 2020 test was cooled down a lot more due to 5 hours at 80K in that test - thus reducing the overall ambient load on the inner shield ...

 

Attachment 1: Screen_Shot_2021-03-16_at_6.44.09_PM.png
Screen_Shot_2021-03-16_at_6.44.09_PM.png
Attachment 2: IMG_1397.jpg
IMG_1397.jpg
Attachment 3: Screen_Shot_2021-03-16_at_7.09.34_PM.png
Screen_Shot_2021-03-16_at_7.09.34_PM.png
  Draft   Thu Apr 1 20:28:26 2021 RadhikaDailyProgress2um PhotodiodesOpened cryo chamber and removed old PD

04/01/21

Aidan and I removed the old PD from the cryo chamber in order to start testing C3 (plan for tomorrow, 04/02).

Steps:

- Brought chamber up to room pressure, disconnected readout wires and vacuum pump.

- Picked up chamber and placed it upside down on makeshift support stand (see pics).

- Unscrewed outer and inner insulation plates.

 

  2550   Thu Apr 1 20:54:57 2021 RadhikaDailyProgress2um PhotodiodesOpened cryo chamber and removed old PD

04/01/21

Aidan and I removed the old PD from the cryo chamber in order to start testing C3 (plan for tomorrow, 04/02).

Steps:

- Brought chamber up to room pressure, disconnected readout wires and vacuum pump.

- Picked up chamber and placed it upside down on makeshift support stand (see pics).

- Unscrewed mounting plate and 2 inner insulation plates to reveal mounted PD.

- Had trouble unscrewing PD mount, since the screws were very close to the PD and we had to be careful not to slip and cause damage. Started with 2 side screws, then bottom (hardest), then top.

- Successfully removed PD and put away. Placed chamber components back in place without bolting in.

- Plan is to mount PD C3 in chamber tomorrow and begin testing.

 

Attachment 1: IMG_1834.jpg
IMG_1834.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_1837.jpg
IMG_1837.jpg
Attachment 3: IMG_1838.jpg
IMG_1838.jpg
Attachment 4: IMG_1842.jpg
IMG_1842.jpg
Attachment 5: IMG_1841.jpg
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Attachment 6: IMG_1844.jpg
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Attachment 7: IMG_1845.jpg
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  2553   Fri Apr 9 16:23:22 2021 ranaDailyProgress2um PhotodiodesOpened cryo chamber and removed old PD

To aid in taking photos of these diodes, I put a USB microscope on Anchal's desk - you can grab it from there. I use it with mac Photo Booth, but it should be easy to use with any camera application.

Also, I recommend buying a macro lens(es) for cell phones from Amazon or B&H.  Label them with the QIL lab sticker so they don't disappear.

  2554   Tue Apr 13 11:48:04 2021 RadhikaDailyProgress2um PhotodiodesOpened cryo chamber and removed old PD

I posted a video tutorial of the diode replacement.

https://dcc.ligo.org/G2100807

Quote:

04/01/21

Aidan and I removed the old PD from the cryo chamber in order to start testing C3 (plan for tomorrow, 04/02).

Steps:

- Brought chamber up to room pressure, disconnected readout wires and vacuum pump.

- Picked up chamber and placed it upside down on makeshift support stand (see pics).

- Unscrewed mounting plate and 2 inner insulation plates to reveal mounted PD.

- Had trouble unscrewing PD mount, since the screws were very close to the PD and we had to be careful not to slip and cause damage. Started with 2 side screws, then bottom (hardest), then top.

- Successfully removed PD and put away. Placed chamber components back in place without bolting in.

- Plan is to mount PD C3 in chamber tomorrow and begin testing.

 

 

  2556   Fri Apr 16 11:27:01 2021 AidanUpdate2um Photodiodes2um DC photodiode voltage weird drift with no incident power

[Aidan, Radhika, Nina]

We noticed that the DC channel readout (FM30) of the JPL A1 photodiode is drifting around. What we observe with no light on the photodiode, is the DC output drifiting around. It gets particularly bad when we apply voltage to other DAC channels.

For example, the attached plot shows the DC voltage from the photodiode as I change the set voltage to the laser diode driver. To be absolutely clear, the laser driver itself was completely powered off. I'm just varying the voltage going into the set point BNC connector on the back of it.

For reference, the set up is:

DAC (300mV bias) > relay > PD > relay  > FEMTO preamp (1000x gain) > ADC channel FM30

 

Attachment 1: DC_2um_voltage_weirdness.png
DC_2um_voltage_weirdness.png
ELOG V3.1.3-