40m QIL Cryo_Lab CTN SUS_Lab TCS_Lab OMC_Lab CRIME_Lab FEA ENG_Labs OptContFac Mariner WBEEShop
  Mariner elog, Page 1 of 2  Not logged in ELOG logo
ID Date Author Type Categorydown Subject
  23   Thu Aug 26 17:40:41 2021 StephenGeneralSuspensionSelecting MOS-style frame

[Koji, Stephen]

Kind of a silly post, and not very scientific, but we are sticking to it. During our check in today we discussed Mariner suspension frame design concept, and we chose to proceed with MOS-style (4 posts, rectangular footprint).

 - We looked at a scaled-up SOS (WIP, lots of things broke, just notice the larger side plates and base - see Attachment 1) and we were not super excited by the aspect ratio of the larger side plates - didn't look super stiff - or the mass of the base.

 - We noted that the intermediate mass will need OSEMs, and accommodating those will be easier if there is a larger footprint (as afforded by MOS).

MOS-style it is, moving forward!

Also, Checked In to PDM (see Attachment 2 - filename 40mETMsuspension_small-shields.SLDASM and filepath \llpdmpro\Voyager\mariner 40m cryo upgrade ) the current state of the Mariner suspension concept assembly (using MOS). Other than updating the test mass to the 6" configuration, I didn't do any tidying up, so I'm not perfectly satisfied with the state of the model. This at least puts the assembly in a place where anyone can access and work on it. Progress!

Attachment 1: no_sos_cad_screenshot.png
no_sos_cad_screenshot.png
Attachment 2: vault_check_in_of_mariner_suspension_cad.png
vault_check_in_of_mariner_suspension_cad.png
  45   Wed Nov 3 02:52:49 2021 KojiGeneralSuspensionMariner Sus Design

All parameters are temporary:

Test mass size: D150mm x L140mm
Intermediate mass size W152.4mm x D152.4mm x H101.6mm
TM Magnets: 70mm from the center

Height from the bottom of the base plate
- Test mass: 5.0" (127mm) ==> 0.5" margin for the thermal insulation etc (for optical height of 5.5")
- Suspension Top: 488.95mm
- Top suspension block bottom: 17.75" (450.85mm)
- Intermediate Mass: 287.0mm (Upper pendulum length 163.85mm / Lower pendulum length 160mm)

OSEMs
- IM OSEMs: Top x2 (V/P)<-This is a mistake (Nov 3 fixed), Face x3 (L/Y/P), Side x 1 (S)
- TM OSEMs: Face x4
- OSEM insertion can be adjusted with 4-40 screws

To Do:
- EQ Stops / Cradle
(Nov 3 50% done)
- Space Consideration: Is it too tight?
- Top Clamp: We are supposed to have just two wires
(Nov 3 50% done)
- Lower / Middle / Upper Clamps & Consider installation procedure
- Fine alignment adjustment
- Pendulum resonant frequencies & tuning of the parameters
- Utility holes: other sensors / RTDs / Cabling / etc

- Top clamp options: rigid mount vs blade springs
- Top plate utility holes
- IM EQ stops

Discussion with Rana

- Hoe do we decide the clear aperture size for the TM faces?
- OSEM cable stays
- Thread holes for baffles

- Light Machinery can do Si machining
- Thermal conductivity/expansion

- The bottom base should be SUS... maybe others Al except for the clamps

- Suspension eigenmodes separation and temperature dependence

 

# Deleted the images because they are obsolete.

  46   Thu Nov 4 00:42:05 2021 KojiGeneralSuspensionMariner Sus Design

Some more progress:

- Shaved the height of the top clamp blocks. We can extend the suspension height a bit more, but this has not been done.

- The IM OSEM arrangement was fixed.

- Some EQ stops were implemented. Not complete yet.

Attachment 1: Screen_Shot_2021-11-04_at_12.38.46_AM.png
Screen_Shot_2021-11-04_at_12.38.46_AM.png
Attachment 2: Screen_Shot_2021-11-04_at_12.39.53_AM.png
Screen_Shot_2021-11-04_at_12.39.53_AM.png
  51   Thu May 5 19:56:25 2022 KojiGeneralSuspensionMariner Suspension Cryo shield Install / Removal steps

Does this work? Is this insane?

Attachment 1: 40m_Mariner_Suspension-0062.png
40m_Mariner_Suspension-0062.png
Attachment 2: 40m_Mariner_Suspension.mp4
  52   Tue May 10 18:29:11 2022 ranaGeneralSuspensionMariner Suspension Cryo shield Install / Removal steps

Transformers Optimus GIF - Transformers Optimus Prime - Discover & Share  GIFs

cool

 

  53   Thu Jun 16 14:04:30 2022 JuanGeneralSuspensionTable for Mariner Suspension Cryo

Today we looked at possible locations for where we will be setting up Mariner Suspension and Cryo chamber. The first option was the far left table in the CAML lab but it seems that there is going to be an issue with height clearance, so we have come up with another solution which takes a table from Koji's lab which is 3'x4' ft and moving it into CAML lab in the back right of the lab. To move the table we may need to call facilities to help us because we will most likely need to take the table apart to get it out of the lab. The aisle space in Koji's lab is about 43 inches, but the doorway, which is the tightest space, is 35 inches.

After we have set up the table in CAML we are planning on moving the Chamber in DOPO-lab to CAML. We plan to use skyhook with has a load limit of 500lbs/227kg this should be more than enough to move the chamber. We still need to get the wheeled base for skyhook we are in the works in doing so. 

Also, We want to remove the previous setup from the chamber and leave it at DOPO-lab. Stephen is going to figure out how to keep it clean (sort of). Besides these transportation logistics, I am also working on the electronics as an immediate task and the electrical arrangement in the chamber.

to do list
        - Check the table height
        - Check the chamber height (base/cap)
        - Check how much the chamber cap needs to be lifted (so that we can remove it)
        - Is the weight capacity sufficient?

 

  54   Thu Jun 16 19:43:36 2022 KojiGeneralSuspensionTable for Mariner Suspension Cryo

- B246/QIL Skyhook

  • Find the base of Skyhook. It should be in the storage room (B246). Stephen contacted Chub for lab access. Done
  • Assemble Skyhook with the base and check the stability/safety/capacity/height/etc

- DOPO

  • Ask Paco to move the delicate instruments from the table. Done
  • Bring Skyhook to DOPO. The chamber seems already vented.
  • Find the way to place the cap on the floor safely and cleanly. => Stephen
     
  • Open the cap and then remove the crackle interferometer. Wrap it with something and place it somewhere in the room. How? => Stephen
     
  • Move the base to a dolly or something. Then put a cap on the base. => It'd be better to ask Caltech Transp for the chamber transportation.
  • Do we have to temporarily remove the laser safety curtain?

- OMC Lab

  • We probably need to separate the optical table and the base. Ask Caltech Transp to check how the work should be done.
  • Do we have to temporarily move anything on the way?
  • The table can be rolled out to the corridor and then rolled in to the CAML.

- CAML

  • Remove the grey rack and push the desk to the East.
  • Place the optical table.
  • Place the rack close to the table.
  55   Thu Jun 23 21:11:03 2022 KojiGeneralSuspensionTable for Mariner Suspension Cryo

Table moving effort in the OMC lab: See https://nodus.ligo.caltech.edu:8081/OMC_Lab/412

 

  2   Thu May 21 12:10:03 2020 StephenGeneralResourcesOngoing Mariner Resources

Ongoing points of updates/content (list to be maintained and added)
Mariner Chat Channel
Mariner Git Repository
Mariner 40m Timeline [2020-2021] Google Spreadsheet
 

  60   Thu Jul 7 15:20:04 2022 ranaGeneralOptical Contactingsome useful links

For our optical contacting, Jennifer and I are starting out with glass (microscope slides), with the setup in the EE shop next to the drill press (photos from Jennifer to follow).

Some interesting links:

  • https://www.laserfocusworld.com/optics/article/16546805/optical-fabrication-optical-contacting-grows-more-robust is a write up on contacting, and the link to Dan Shaddock's paper is also useful (need to sign up to get the acutal TSP writeup)
  • Thesis on Silicon Bonding (https://escholarship.org/uc/item/5bm8g42k)
  • https://youtu.be/qvBoGoh_-AE
  62   Mon Jul 11 16:24:31 2022 Jennifer HritzGeneralOptical ContactingBaselining the temperature output of the Oster hot plate

This was performed last Friday (7/8).

I secured a thermocouple perpendicular against the hotplate and recorded the maximum temperature the hotplate reached at Low, Medium, and High. It took about 5 minutes to reach a stable temperature, where stable means that the temperature stayed within +/- 0.5°C for a minute. The hotplate maintains a certain temperature by turning itself on and off, so the temperature would drop slightly (at most, a few °C) while the hotplate was off. The maximums were:
Low: 51°C
Medium: 185°C
High: 263°C
At the max temperature, I moved the perpendicular thermocouple around to roughly find the variation in tempearture at different locations on the hotplate. Facing the nob, the top right quadrant is about 10-20°C cooler than the other quadrants, which are within 5°C of eachother. Excluding the cooler quandrant, the center and the outer edge are within 5°C of eachother. The temperature increases as one approaches half the radius, with it being about 20-40°C greater than the center and outer edge. The highest recorded temparture was 289°C at half the radius in the bottom left quandrant. This was only meant to be a rough test to see how even the heating is.

Attachment 1: PXL_20220708_230038748.jpg
PXL_20220708_230038748.jpg
Attachment 2: PXL_20220708_230234841.MP.jpg
PXL_20220708_230234841.MP.jpg
  63   Mon Jul 11 17:27:39 2022 Jennifer HritzGeneralOptical ContactingFirst successful bond

Note that the slides have "GLOBE" printed on one side. I always bond the opposite using the opposite side without the text.

On Monday (7/11), I began experimenting with bonding, starting with "air-bonding," which is trying to make dry, gently cleaned slides stick. I achieved my first succesful optical contact with what I call "acidental water-assisted direct bonding" or "water-bonding," where I accidentally clasped two wet slides together while washing my dirty finger prints off them. After the accidental discovery, I repeated it by running water over the slides while there were clasped together and achieved the same result. After a few hours, I attempted partially sliding apart the second water-bonded sample. I could slowly push them apart by pressing my thumbs against the long edge, but it took quite a bit of force. I decided to let 4 samples sit overnight: 1 air-bonded, 1 air-bonded with the brass hunk on top of it, and 2 water-bonded. Neither time nor pressure improved the air-bonded samples as they still slid apart very easily. The first water-bonded sample slid apart easier, but one part remained stubornly attached until I began shaking it violently. The second water-bonded sample was much harder to slide apart than the last time I tested it. With all the force of my fingers, I could barely make it budge.

Attachment 1: PXL_20220712_223449788.MP.jpg
PXL_20220712_223449788.MP.jpg
  66   Thu Jul 14 14:55:01 2022 Jennifer HritzGeneralOptical ContactingTesting isopropanol and methanol

Note that I am just testing out different techniques, so I have not set up the thermocouples to precisely measure the temperatue.
On Tuesday, I developed a new method of putting water, isopropanol, or methanol on one slide then squishing the other slide on top of it to fill the gap with the afformentioned liquid. The slides are slippery at first, but as they dried, which took about 15 minutes, the bond forms. The bonds were strong enough that I could just barely push the slides appart by applying pressure to the side using my thumbs. I prepared 4 samples this way, 2 with iso and 2 with meth. I took one of each and heated them on Medium for 30 minutes under the brass hunk with the aluminum square on the bottom and copper foil on both sides of the samples. Earlier in the day, I tried heating them without the weight on top, but the heat just broke the bond. I took the remain two and set them aside as controls.
On Thursday, I returned to check the bonds. The heated samples had broken. I intented to check on Wednesday, but I was sick from food poisoning, so I do not know whether the bonds broke immediately after heating or due to sitting for an extra day. For the control samples, one also had a broken bond, but the other had become even stronger.
I noticed that, when the slides are successfully bonded, the shape and appearance of the Newton's rings change, which can be seen in the pictures. I speculate that the circles on the unbroken control are the bonded regions. Ideally, we want to see no Newton's rings.

Attachment 1: PXL_20220714_220953206.MP_2.jpg
PXL_20220714_220953206.MP_2.jpg
Attachment 2: PXL_20220714_220940258.MP_2.jpg
PXL_20220714_220940258.MP_2.jpg
Attachment 3: PXL_20220714_222105409.jpg
PXL_20220714_222105409.jpg
Attachment 4: PXL_20220713_003923957.jpg
PXL_20220713_003923957.jpg
  71   Wed Jul 27 14:50:20 2022 Jennifer HritzGeneralOptical ContactingBonding without liquids and narrowing down heating issue

I have found that, after cleaning the glass with methanol (or even sometimes with just a dry lense-cleaning cloth), I can get glass slides to bond by rappidly rubbing them together until something sticks. This was inspired by watching "Wizard of Vaz" perform bonds on YoutTube. While cleaning, I now use enough strength to make the glass squeak, as advised by him.

Upon heating, I encountered the same issue as when I bonded them by putting a liquid (water, methanol, etc.) in the gap, which leads me to now believe that the broken bond is not due to the expansion of a liquid. Further, even at the low temperature of 60°C, placing the liquid-less sample on the hotplate breaks the bond in seconds, which I caught on video. In the attached video*, you can see that, before the heat, the bond is strong enough that I cannot push it appart with my fingers, but after the heat, it slides easily. Note that, outside of taking the video, I always lay the entire slide on the center of the metal so the sample is evenly heated.

*This is my first time attaching a video. If it didn't attach properly, I'll add it on to a later log. I also want to record myself performing the rubbing bonding technique.

Attachment 1: PXL_20220727_214658230.jpg
PXL_20220727_214658230.jpg
Attachment 2: PXL_20220727_214241668.mp4
  73   Thu Aug 4 13:44:56 2022 Jennifer HritzGeneralOptical ContactingSuccess with slowly heating

Yesterday, I did two rounds of slowly heating 4 samples to the maximum hot plate temperature. This was to formally test if my success with a single sample earlier in the week was a fluke. Note that the hot plate takes about 10-15 minutes to reach a stable temperature when it is turned up one notch.

First round:
I bonded 4 samples by putting methanol in the gap between the glass slides and letting it dry to create a gap.
Starting at room temperature, I heated the slides on each setting for roughly 15 minutes, then let them cool down naturally over the course of an hour. 3 broke broke at medium heat, and 1 survived the whole process. I belive these broke because the bonds were weaker and I heated them slightly too quickly. In previous tests, I would manually switch the hot plate on and off, but I wanted to see if the hot plate could heat up slow enough on its own.

Second round:
I bonded 4 samples by scrubbing the slides with methanol, using a compressed air duster to blow off the fibers, rubbing them together with the pressure of my fingers, and repeating this whole procedure until they stuck (it took 2-4 repeats).
Starting at room temperature, I heated the slides on each setting for exactly 20 minutes, then let them cool down naturally over the course of an hour. All of them survived to the maximum temperature (the pictures show them at the start and end of the heating, note the temperature). I credit this to the stronger bonding proceedure and the extra 5 minutes for them to adjust to the temperature. I did not turn the hot plate on or off at any point, I just let it heat up at its own rate.

I cannot tell if the bonds are stronger. The size and shape of the Newtons rings did not change.

Attachment 1: PXL_20220803_232203193.jpg
PXL_20220803_232203193.jpg
Attachment 2: PXL_20220804_002433906.jpg
PXL_20220804_002433906.jpg
  77   Tue Aug 16 19:54:29 2022 Jennifer HritzGeneralOptical ContactingRazor blade test

We succeeded in setting up an apparatus for quantifiying the razor blade test. After mounting the glass slides such that the razor edge rested against the gap, we slowly turned the knob to push the blade into the gap. We started with the knob at 0.111, and at 0.757, the bond between the glass slides failed. As we approached 0.757, the interference pattern in the glass shifted, foreshadowing the break.

(Edit by Koji. This 0.757 is 0.0757 I suppose...? And the unit is in inch)

Attachment 1: PXL_20220817_023737796.MP.jpg
PXL_20220817_023737796.MP.jpg
Attachment 2: PXL_20220817_023741865.MP.jpg
PXL_20220817_023741865.MP.jpg
  3   Fri Jun 5 11:13:50 2020 RaymondGeneralHeat LoadSteady state heat load example

Attached is a cartoon partial view into the heat load experienced by the Mariner assembly.

The omnigraffle file with more explicit arrow labelling in the 'layers' tab is available here. The dashed red lines along to top represent vacuum chamber radiation incident on all sides of the OS/IS, not just from the top. Off picture to the right is the BS, left is the beam tube/ETM chamber -- hence the lower absored laser power (solid line) absorbtion (PR power + no HR coating absorption). 

Parameters: 

  • Emissivities are listed outside the cartoon.
  • Shields consist of polished aluminum outer surfaces and high emissivity inner surfaces. 
  • 1 W input power, 50 W power recycling, 30 kW cavity power
  • All shields held at 77K 
  • IS snout radius is equal to TM radius
  • 20 ppm/cm bulk silicon absoprtion, 5 ppm coating absorption

Assumptions

  • Steady state condition, where the shields are able to be cooled/held to 77K
  • Holes punched into the inner shield for stops, magnets, etc are assumed to shine RT light onto 123K TM
    • This is very conservative, MOS will stablize at some temp and the OS should block ~all vacuum chamber radiation not funneled through inner shield snout

Missing or wrong

  • [M] Contribution of MOS conduction and emission on the outer shield heat budget
  • [M] Inner shield 
  • [W] OS inner surface currently modelled as one surface seeing incident RT light, need to accomodate the view factor of each of the 5 high e sides to the open maw of the OS
  • [M] Conduction through shield masses, how efficient is it to link them with straps
  • [M] no AR coating absorption 
  • [M/W] Cold finger cooling power from room temp shield to 77K cryocooler ('wrong' label because 61W is only the heat load once shields are cooled):
    • Worst case to reach: 1.5m connection between tank flange and shield (from flange at bottom of the tank)
      • Phosphorous deoxidized copper:  5 cm diameter
      • ETP copper:  3.5 cm diameter
    • Best case: 0.5m connection, from flange at level of OS
      • Phos deox Cu: 3 cm diameter
      • ETP Cu: 2 cm diameter
    • ​​​q_{\text{conductive}} = \frac{A}{L} \left[\int_{4\, \text{K}}^{T_2} \lambda(T) dT - \int_{4\, \text{K}}^{T_1} \lambda(T)dT \right]
Attachment 1: Heat_Load_Sketch.pdf
Heat_Load_Sketch.pdf
  30   Fri Sep 24 13:12:00 2021 RadhikaGeneralHeat LoadMariner cooldown model status + next steps

*Note: the current modeling script can be found at: CryoEngineering/MarinerCooldownEstimation.ipynb

Nina pointed me to the current mariner cooldown estimation script (path above) and we have since met a few times to discuss upgrades/changes. Nina's hand calculations were mostly consistent with the existing model, so minimal changes were necessary. The material properties and geometric parameters of the TM and snout were updated to the values recently verified by Nina. To summarize, the model considers the following heat sources onto the testmass (Pin):

- laser absorption by ITM bulk (function of incident laser power, PR gain, and bulk absorption)

- laser absorption by ITM HR coating (function of incident laser power and HR coating absorption)

- radiative heating from room-temp tube snout (function of snout radius and length, and TM radius)

The heat transfer out of the testmass (Pout) is simply the sum of the radiative heat emitted by the HR and AR faces and the barrel. Note that the script currently assumes an inner shield T of 77K, and the inner/outer shield geometric parameters need to be obtained/verified.

Nina and Paco have been working towards obtaining tabulated emissivity data as a function of temperature and wavelength. In the meantime, I created the framework to import this tabulated data, use cubic spline interpolation, and return temperature-dependent emissivities. It should be straightforward to incorporate the emissivity data once it is available. Currently, the script uses room-temperature values for the emissivities of various materials. 

Future steps:

- Incorporate tabulated emissivity data

- Verify and update inner/outer shield dimensions

 

 

 

 

  31   Mon Sep 27 17:01:53 2021 ranaGeneralHeat LoadMariner cooldown model status + next steps

How about a diagram so that we can understand what this model includes?

  32   Wed Sep 29 16:15:19 2021 RadhikaGeneralHeat LoadMariner cooldown model status + next steps

Attachment 1 is a geometric diagram that reflects the current state of the ITM cooldown model, introduced in [30]. The inner shield is assumed to be held at 77K for simplicity, and 2 heat sources are considered: laser heating, and radiative heating from the room-temperature snout opening. The view factor Fij between the snout opening and test mass (modeled as 2 coaxial parallel discs separated by length L - equation found in Cengel Heat Transfer) is calculated to be 0.022. The parameters used in the model are noted in the figure.

Attachment 2 is a simplified diagram that includes the heating/cooling links to the test mass. At 123K, the radiative cooling power from the inner shield (at 77K) is 161 mW. The radiative heating from the snout opening is 35 mW, and the laser heating (constant) is 101.5 mW. Due to the tiny view factor betwen the snout opening and the test mass, most of the heat emitted by the opening does not get absorbed. 

The magnitudes of heating and cooling power can be seen in Attachment 3. Lastly, Attachment 4 plots the final cooldown curve given this model. 

My next step is to add the outer shield and fix its temperature, and then determine the optimal size/location of the inner shield to maximize cooling of the test mass. This is question was posed by Koji in order to inform inner shield/outer shield geometric specs. Then, I will add a cold finger and cryo cooler (conductive cooling). Diagrams will be updated/posted accordingly.

Attachment 1: Heat_Load_Sketch_geometry.pdf
Heat_Load_Sketch_geometry.pdf
Attachment 2: Heat_Load_Sketch_diagram.pdf
Heat_Load_Sketch_diagram.pdf
Attachment 3: heating_cooling_P_vs_T.pdf
heating_cooling_P_vs_T.pdf
Attachment 4: CooldownTM_radiative.pdf
CooldownTM_radiative.pdf
  37   Tue Oct 5 17:46:14 2021 RadhikaGeneralHeat LoadMariner cooldown model status + next steps

Building on [32], I added a copper cold finger to conductively cool the inner shield, instead of holding the inner shield fixed at 77K. The cold finger draws cooling power from a cyro cooler or "cold bath" held at 60K, for simplicity. I added an outer shield and set its temperature to 100K. The outer shield supplies some radiative heating to the inner shield, but blocks out 295K heating, which is what we want. The expanded diagram can be seen in Attachment 1. 

I wanted to find the optimal choice of inner shield area (AIS) to maximize the radiative cooling to the test mass. I chose 5 values for AIS (from ATM to AOS) and plotted the test mass cooldown for each in Attachment 2. The radiative coupling between the inner shield and test mass is maximized when the ratio of the areas, ATM/AIS, is minimized. Therefore, the larger AIS, the colder the test mass can be cooled. Even though choosing AIS close to AOS increases the coupling between the 2 shields, the resulting heating from the outer shield is negligible compared to the enhancement in cooling.

I chose AIS = 0.22 m2 to model the inner shield and test mass cooldown in Attachment 3. The test mass reaches 123 K at ~ 125 hours, or a little over 5 days. I have pushed the updated script which can be found under mariner40/CryoEngineering/MarinerCooldownEstimation.ipynb.

Attachment 1: Heat_Load_Sketch_all.pdf
Heat_Load_Sketch_all.pdf
Attachment 2: VaryingISA.pdf
VaryingISA.pdf
Attachment 3: CooldownTM.pdf
CooldownTM.pdf
  42   Fri Oct 15 13:45:55 2021 RadhikaGeneralHeat LoadMariner cooldown model status + next steps

I used the same model in [37] to consider how test mass length affects the cooldown. Attachment 1 plots the curves for TM length=100mm and 150mm. The coupling between the test mass and inner shield is proportional to the area of the test mass, and therefore increases with increasing length. Choosing l=100mm (compared to 150mm) thus reduces the radiative cooling of the test mass. The cooldown time to 123K is ~125 hrs or over 5 days for TM length=150mm (unchanged from [37]), but choosing TM length=100m increases this time to ~170 hrs or ~7 days. (Note that these times/curves are derived from choosing an arbitrary inner shield area of 0.22 m2, but the relative times should stay roughly consistent with different IS area choices.)

Attachment 1: VaryingTMl.pdf
VaryingTMl.pdf
  43   Fri Oct 15 14:31:15 2021 RadhikaGeneralHeat LoadMariner cooldown model status + next steps

I reran the cooldown model, setting the emissivity of the inner surface of the inner shield to 0.7 (coating), and the emissivity of the outer surface to 0.03 (polished Al). Previously, the value for both surfaces was set to 0.3 (rough aluminum). 

Attachment 1: TM cooldown, varying area of the inner shield. Now, the marginal improvement in cooldown once the IS area reaches 0.22 m2 is negligible. Cooldown time to 123K is ~100 hrs, just over 4 days. I've kept IS area set to 0.22 m2 moving forward.

Attachment 2: TM/IS cooldown, considering 2 lengths for the test mass. Choosing l=100m instead of 150mm increases cooldown time from ~100 hrs to ~145 hrs, or 6 days.

Attachment 1: VaryingISA.pdf
VaryingISA.pdf
Attachment 2: VaryingTMl.pdf
VaryingTMl.pdf
  1   Thu May 21 11:51:44 2020 KojiGeneralGeneralMariner Elog Test

The first entry of the Mariner elog post

  20   Fri Aug 6 04:34:43 2021 KojiGeneralGeneralTheoretical Cooling Time Limit

I was thinking about how fast we can cool the test mass. No matter how we improve the emissivity of the test mass and the cryostat, there is a theoretical limitation. I wanted to calculate it as a reference to know how good the cooling is in an experiment.

We have a Si test mass of 300K in a blackbody cryostat with a 0K shield. How fast can we cool the test mass?

m\,C_p(t)\,T'(t) = -\epsilon\,\sigma A\,[T(t)^4 - 0^4]

T(0) = T_0

Then assume the specific heat is linear as

C_p(t) = c_{p0} T(t)

The actual Cp follows a nonlinear function (cf Debye model), but this is not a too bad assumption down to ~100K.

Then the differential equation can be analytically solved:

T(t) = T_0 \left( 1 + t/t_0 \right )^{-1/2},

where the characteristic time of t0 is

t_0 = \frac{m c_{p0}}{2\,\epsilon\,\sigma A\,T_0^2 }.

Here T_0 is the initial temperature, cp0 is the slope of the specific heat (Cp(T_0) = c_p0 T_0). epsilon is the emissivity of the test mass, sigma is Stefan Boltzmann constant, A is the radiating surface area, and m is the mass of the test mass.

Up to the characteristic time, the cooling is slow. Then the temperature falls sqrt(t) after that.

As the surface-volume ratio m/A becomes bigger for a larger mass, in general, the cooling of the bigger mass requires more time.

For the QIL 4" mass, Mariner 150mm mass, and the Voyager 450mm mass, t0 is 3.8hr, 5.6hr, and 33.7hr respectively.

  • If the emissivity is not 1, just the cooling time is expanded by that factor. (i.e. The emissivity of 0.5 takes x2 more time to cool)
  • And if the shields are not cooled fast or have a finite temperature in the end, of course, the cooling will require more time.
  • 1.25 t0 and 8 t0 tell us how long it takes to reach 200K and 100K.

This is the fundamental limit for radiation cooling. Thus, we have to use conductive cooling if we want to accelerate the cooling further more than this curve.

Attachment 1: cooling_curves.pdf
cooling_curves.pdf
  22   Tue Aug 24 08:15:37 2021 Jiri SmetanaGeneralGeneralActuation Feedback Model

I'm posting a summary of the work I've done on the Lagrangian analysis of the Mariner suspension design and a state space model of the actuator control loop. The whole feedback mechanism can be understood with reference to the block diagram in attachment 1.

The dynamics of the suspension are contained within the Plant block. To obtain these, I derived the system Lagrangian, solved the Euler-Lagrange equations for each generalised coordinate and solved the set of simultaneous equations to get the transfer functions from each input parameter to each generalised coordinate. From these, I can obtain the transfer functions from each input to each observable output. In this case, I inserted horizontal ground motion at the pivot point (top of suspension) and a generic horizontal force applied to at the intermediate mass. These two drives become the two inputs to the Plant block. The two observables are xi - the position of the intermediate mass, which is sensed and fed to the actuator servo, and xt - the test mass position that we are most interested in. I obtained the transfer functions from each input to each output using a symbolic solver in Python and then constructed a MIMO state space representation of these transfer functions in MATLAB. For this initial investigation, I've modelled the suspension in the Lagrangian as a lossless point-mass double pendulum with two degrees of freedom - the angle to the horizontal of the first mass and the angle to the horizontal of the second mass. The transfer functions are very similar to the more advanced treatment with elastic restoring forces and moments of inertia and the system can always be expanded in a later analysis.

For the sensor block I assumed a very simple model given by

x_s = G_s(x_i - x_g) + n_s

where G_s is the conversion factor from the physical distance in metres to the electronic signal (in, for example, volts or ADC counts) and n_s is the added sensor noise. A more general sensor model can easily be added at a later date to account for, say, a diminishing sensor response over different frequency ranges.

The actuator block converts the measured displacement of the intermediate mass into an actuation force, with some added actuator noise. The servo transfer function can be tuned to whatever filter we find works best but for now I've made two quite basic suggestions: a simple servo that actuates on the velocity of the intermediate mass, given by

\frac{F(s)}{x_s(s)} = G_as

and an 'improved' servo, which includes a roll-off after the resonances, given by

\frac{F(s)}{x_s(s)} = \frac{G_as}{(s-p)^2}

where p is the pole frequency at which we want the roll-off to occur. Attachment 2 shows the two servo transfer functions for comparison.

The state space models can then be connected to close the loop and create a single state space model for the transfer functions of the ground and each noise source to the horizontal test mass displacement. Attachment 3 contains the transfer functions from xg to xt and shows the effect of closing the loop with the two servo choices compared to the transfer function through just the Plant alone. We can see that the closed loop system does damp away the resonances as we want for both servo choices. The basic servo, howerver, loses us a factor of 1/f^2 in suppression at high frequencies, as it approximates the effect of viscous damping. The improved servo gives us the damping but also recovers the original suppression at high frequencies due to the roll-off. I can now provide the ground and noise spectra and propagate them through to work out the fluctuations of the test mass position.

Attachment 1: actuator_feedback_diagram.png
actuator_feedback_diagram.png
Attachment 2: bode_servo.png
bode_servo.png
Attachment 3: bode_plant.png
bode_plant.png
  26   Wed Sep 15 09:15:21 2021 Jiri SmetanaGeneralGeneralActuation Feedback Model and Noise

I've implemented a more extensive feedback model that uses proper conversions between metres, volts, counts etc. and includes all the (inverse) (de)whitening filters, driver, servo and noise injections in the correct places. I then closed the loop to obtain the transfer function from horizontal ground motion and each noise source to test mass displacement. I tuned the servo gain to reduce the Q of both resonances to ~20.

Our idea was then to compensate servo gain with the output resistance of the coil driver to raise the RMS of the DAC output signal in order to raise SNR and thus suppress DAC noise coupling. I found that raising the output resistor by a factor of 10 above the nominal suggestion 2.4 kOhm gave me a DAC output RMS of 0.3 V, so in line with our safety factor of 10 requirements. This also coincidentally made all the noise sources intersect at approximately the same frequency when these noises begin to dominate over the seismic noise. All these initial tests are subject to change, particularly depending on the design of the servo transfer function. I'm attaching the relevant plots as well as the MATLAB script I used and the two files required for the script to run.

Attachment 1: displacement_asd.png
displacement_asd.png
Attachment 2: servo.png
servo.png
Attachment 3: system_loop.m
% Get piezo stack transfer function
PZT_f = fscanf(fopen('ground_freq.txt'), '%f');
PZT_tf = fscanf(fopen('ground_xx.txt'), '%f');

% Set frequency vector and ground motion
freq = logspace(-1, 2, 1e4);
grnd = ground(freq);
PZT = interp1(PZT_f, PZT_tf, freq);

% Set complex frequency variable
... 185 more lines ...
Attachment 4: ground_freq.txt
0.1
0.5
1
1.419178617
1.489659958
1.554545445
1.719720097
1.806748355
2.030363506
2.133112203
... 110 more lines ...
Attachment 5: ground_xx.txt
1
1.3
1.8
2.794167453
2.905480556
3.077890921
3.854210495
4.502922159
5.213856692
4.990356828
... 110 more lines ...
  27   Thu Sep 16 10:02:47 2021 Jiri SmetanaGeneralGeneralActuation Feedback Model and Noise

Here's the DAC voltage spectrum with its associated RMS.

Also, for clarity, this model is for a lossless point-mass double pendulum system with equal masses and equal lengths of 20 cm.

Quote:

I've implemented a more extensive feedback model that uses proper conversions between metres, volts, counts etc. and includes all the (inverse) (de)whitening filters, driver, servo and noise injections in the correct places. I then closed the loop to obtain the transfer function from horizontal ground motion and each noise source to test mass displacement. I tuned the servo gain to reduce the Q of both resonances to ~20.

Our idea was then to compensate servo gain with the output resistance of the coil driver to raise the RMS of the DAC output signal in order to raise SNR and thus suppress DAC noise coupling. I found that raising the output resistor by a factor of 10 above the nominal suggestion 2.4 kOhm gave me a DAC output RMS of 0.3 V, so in line with our safety factor of 10 requirements. This also coincidentally made all the noise sources intersect at approximately the same frequency when these noises begin to dominate over the seismic noise. All these initial tests are subject to change, particularly depending on the design of the servo transfer function. I'm attaching the relevant plots as well as the MATLAB script I used and the two files required for the script to run.

 

Attachment 1: DAC_voltage.png
DAC_voltage.png
  29   Fri Sep 24 11:02:41 2021 KojiGeneralGeneralActuation Feedback Model and Noise

We had a meeting with the code open in ZOOM. Here are some points we discussed:

  • The code requires another file ground.m. It is attached here.
     
  • The phase of the bode plots were not wrapped. This can be fixed by applying the "PhaseWrapping" options as
    opts=bodeoptions('cstprefs');
    opts.PhaseWrapping = 'on';
    bode(A,opts)

     
  • We evaluated the open-loop transfer function of the system. For this purpose, we added the monitor point ('F') at the actuator and cut the loop there like:
    sys = connect(P, S, W, ADC, Winv, A2, DWinv, Dinv, DAC, DW, D, R, C, {'xg' 'nADC', 'nDAC', 'nd', 'nth'}, 'xt', {'F','VDAC'});
    OLTF=getLoopTransfer(sys(1),'F');
    figure(2)
    clf
    bode(OLTF,opts);
     
  • We played with the loopgain (Ga2). When Ga2 is a positive number, the loop was stable. We had to shift the low pass cut-off frequency from 10Hz to 12Hz to make the damping of the 2nd peak stable.
Attachment 1: ground.m
function [grnd] = ground(freq)
    grnd = 1e-7*(freq<1)+1e-7*(1-(freq<1))./(freq.^2+1e-50);
end
  38   Mon Oct 11 15:22:18 2021 YehonathanGeneralGeneralMicrocomb alternatives

Following our discussion at the Friday JC meeting, I gathered several resources and made a small simulation to show how frequency combs might be generated on platforms other than microcombs or mode-locked lasers.

Indeed, frequency combs generated directly from a mode-locked laser are expensive as they require ultra-broadband operation (emitting few fs pulses) to allow for f-2f interferometry.

Microcombs are a fancy way of generating combs. They are low-power-consuming, chip-scale, have a high repetition rate, and are highly compatible with Silicon technology. While these are huge advantages for industry, they might be disadvantageous for our purpose. Low-power means that the output comb will be weak (on the order of uW of average power). Microscopic/chip-scale means that they suffer from thermal fluctuations. High rep-rate means we will have to worry about tuning our lasers/comb to get beat notes with frequencies smaller than 1GHz.

Alternatively, and this is what companies like Menlo are selling as full-solution frequency combs, we could use much less fancy mode-locked lasers emitting 50fs - 1ps pulses and broaden their spectrum in a highly nonlinear waveguide, either on a chip or a fiber, either in a cavity or linear topologies. This has all the advantages:

1. High-power (typically 100mW)

2. Low rep-rate (typically 100MHz)

3. Relatively cheap

4. "Narrowband" mode-locked lasers are diverse and can come as a fiber laser which offers high stability.

As a proof of concept, I used this generalized Schrodinger equation solver python package to simulate 1d light propagation in a nonlinear waveguide. I simulated pulses coming out of this "pocket" laser (specs in attachment 1) using 50mW average power out of the available 180mW propagating in a 20cm long piece of this highly nonlinear fiber (specs in attachment 2).

The results are shown in attachments 3-4:

Attachment 3 shows the spectrum of the pulse as a function of propagation distance.

Attachment 4 shows the spectrum and the temporal shape of the pulse at the input and output of the fiber.

It can be seen that the spectrum is octave-spanning and reaches 2um at moderate powers.

One important thing to consider in choosing the parameters of the laser and fiber is the coherence of the generated supercontinuum. According to this paper and others, >100fs pulses and/or too much power (100mW average is roughly the limit for 50fs pulses) result in incoherent spectra which is useless in laser locking or 1f-2f interferometry. These limitations apply only when pumping in the anomalous dispersion regime as traditionally have been done. Pumping in an all-normal (but low) dispersion (like in this fiber) can generate coherent spectra even for 1ps pulses according to this paper and others. So even cheaper lasers can be used. ps pulses will require few meter-long fibers though.

 

 

Attachment 1: ELMO_specs.png
ELMO_specs.png
Attachment 2: HNLF_specs.png
HNLF_specs.png
Attachment 3: SimulationResults1.png
SimulationResults1.png
Attachment 4: SimulationResults3.png
SimulationResults3.png
  39   Tue Oct 12 12:44:44 2021 Jiri SmetanaGeneralGeneralNew Damping Loop Model

I've ironed out the issues with my MATLAB model so that it now shows correct phase behaviour. The problem seems to arise from infinite Q poles where there is an ambiguity in choosing a shift of +/- 180 deg in phase. I've changed my state space model to include finite but very high Q poles to aid with the phase behaviour. The model has been uploaded to the GitLab project under mariner40 -> mariner_sus -> models -> lagrangian.

  40   Tue Oct 12 12:49:42 2021 Jiri SmetanaGeneralGeneralDamping Loop (Point-Mass Pendulums)

Now that I have correct phase and amplitude behaviour for my MIMO state space model of the suspension and the system is being correctly evaluated as stable, I'm uploading the useful plots from my analysis. File names should be fairly self-explanatory. The noise plots are for a total height of 550 mm, or wire lengths of 100 mm per stage. I've also attached a model showing the ground motion for different lengths of the suspension.

Attachment 1: servo.png
servo.png
Attachment 2: open_loop.png
open_loop.png
Attachment 3: closed_loop.png
closed_loop.png
Attachment 4: noise.png
noise.png
Attachment 5: length_change.png
length_change.png
  41   Thu Oct 14 04:17:36 2021 Jiri SmetanaGeneralGeneralDamping Loop (Point-Mass Pendulums)

Here are the DAC and residual displacement spectra for different suspension heights ranging from 450 mm to 600 mm. I aimed to get the Q of the lower resonance close to 5 and the DAC output RMS close to 0.5 V but as this was just tweaking values by hand I didn't get to exactly these values so I'm adding the actual values for reference. The parameters are as follows:

Height [mm] Displacement RMS [nm] DAC Output RMS [V] Q Lower Resonance Q Higher Resonance Driver Resistor {Ohm]
600 560 0.51 5.3 1.5 175
550 580 0.54 5.1 1.4 175
500 610 0.49 5.0 1.4 150
450 630 0.54 5.0 1.4 150
Quote:

Now that I have correct phase and amplitude behaviour for my MIMO state space model of the suspension and the system is being correctly evaluated as stable, I'm uploading the useful plots from my analysis. File names should be fairly self-explanatory. The noise plots are for a total height of 550 mm, or wire lengths of 100 mm per stage. I've also attached a model showing the ground motion for different lengths of the suspension.

 

Attachment 1: disp_600.png
disp_600.png
Attachment 2: DAC_600.png
DAC_600.png
Attachment 3: disp_550.png
disp_550.png
Attachment 4: DAC_550.png
DAC_550.png
Attachment 5: disp_500.png
disp_500.png
Attachment 6: DAC_500.png
DAC_500.png
Attachment 7: disp_450.png
disp_450.png
Attachment 8: DAC_450.png
DAC_450.png
  44   Tue Oct 26 08:09:08 2021 Jiri SmetanaGeneralGeneralLagrangian Suspension Model - Extended Body

I've been testing out the extended body lagrangian models and I'm trying to understand the ground motion and force coupling to the test mass displacement. I've compared the two point-mass model to the extended model and, as expected, I get very similar results for the ground coupling. Attachment 1 shows the comparison and asside from more agressive damping of the point-mass model making a small difference at high frequency, the two models look the same. If I look at the force coupling, I get a significantly different result (see attachment 2). I think this makes sense because in the point-mass model I am driving purely horizontal displacement as there is no moment of inertia. However, for the extended body I drive the horizontal position of the centre of mass, which then results in an induced rotation as the change propagates through the dynamics of the system. To obtain a consistent result with the point-mass model, I would need to apply a force through the CoM as well as a counteracting torque to maintain a purely horizontal displacement of the mass. What I am wondering now is, what's the correct/more convenient way to consider the system? Do I want my lagrangian model to (a) couple in pure forces through the CoM and torques around the CoM and then find the correct actuation matrix for driving each degree of freedom in isolation or (b) incorporate the actuation matrix into the lagrangian model so that the inputs to the plant model are a pure drive of the test mass position or tilt?

Attachment 1: comparison_xg.png
comparison_xg.png
Attachment 2: comarison_F.png
comarison_F.png
  49   Wed Nov 17 09:27:04 2021 Jiri SmetanaGeneralGeneralLagrangian Model - Translation & Pitch

I've been having a look at the transfer functions for the translation and pitch of both masses. I'm attaching the plot of all input-to-output transfer functions of interest so far. Here I've identified the pitch resonances of the two masses (one each) as well as the two pendulum modes. I need to now investigate if they occur in the correct places. I have confirmed the DC response by directly solving the statics problem on paper.

Attachment 1: plant_all_tfs.png
plant_all_tfs.png
  50   Wed Dec 15 06:43:43 2021 Jiri SmetanaGeneralGeneralLagrangian Model - Translation & Pitch

I've checked the validity of my state space model in a couple of ways so that we have confidence in the results that it gives. I've checked the DC gain of the transfer functions where it is non-zero. I did this by solving the static balance of forces problem in the extended body model by hand to get the DC CoM position as well as the pitch angle of both masses. In the previous ELOG entry I didn't quite do this for all transfer functions so here I completed the check. My values agree with the model's values to within 10% at the worst end and to within 0.1% at the best end. I performed a second check to see if the frequencies occur in the correct places by considering the case of very low coupling between the different resonant modes. It's difficult to check this in the case where the modes are strongly coupled (for example length-pitch is strong or the two pitch modes are close together) but if I sufficiently separate them, I get very good agreement between my analytic approximation and the state space model.

The model can easily be converted from one that gives motion in X and RY into one that gives motion in Y and RX. Running the model for both directions gives the following list of resonances (note pendulum modes in X and Y direction are identical):

Resonance Type Frequency [Hz]
Pendulum 1 0.85
Pendulum 2 2.10
Pitch 1 0.46
Pitch 2 2.37
Roll 1 17.13
Roll 2 46.09

Given that I think the model seems to give sensible values, I've pushed the updated model to the GitLab repository. It is now possible to quickly change the parameters of the suspension and very quickly see the corresponding shift in the resonances. To change the parameters, open the plain text file called 'params' and change the values to the new ones. Afterwards, run the file 'ss_extended.py', which will solve the state space model, save the resulting ABCD matrices to a folder and print out the values of the resonances to terminal.

Quote:

I've been having a look at the transfer functions for the translation and pitch of both masses. I'm attaching the plot of all input-to-output transfer functions of interest so far. Here I've identified the pitch resonances of the two masses (one each) as well as the two pendulum modes. I need to now investigate if they occur in the correct places. I have confirmed the DC response by directly solving the statics problem on paper.

 

  56   Mon Jun 27 08:22:22 2022 JuanGeneralGeneralGeneral Update/ Need to do task

I've managed to cut and crimp wires for the power board for coil driver. I will begin adding components to the coil driver board.

- Add Components to Coil Driver board 

 - Replace some Sat Amp Componetns

- Still working on moving optical table to CAML

- Unsure if cryochamber has been cleaned and moved

Attachment 1: coildrive.jpg
coildrive.jpg
  57   Sat Jul 2 09:22:39 2022 Juan GeneralGeneralProgress update

I've completed one coil driver board. 
Hopefully next week I can finish the other 2 boards and make the modifications to the sat amp baords. 
 

Attachment 1: IMG-5220.jpg
IMG-5220.jpg
  58   Tue Jul 5 21:06:47 2022 JuanGeneralGeneralWork Update

Update of my current work I have finished one coil driver board and started on the last two that I need here is the progress and Ideally, I'll finish by tomorrow. 

Attachment 1: IMG-5362.jpg
IMG-5362.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG-5361.jpg
IMG-5361.jpg
  59   Thu Jul 7 10:23:04 2022 JuanGeneralGeneralUpdate

Almost done with coil driver boards 

Attachment 1: IMG-5378.jpg
IMG-5378.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG-5379.jpg
IMG-5379.jpg
  61   Fri Jul 8 17:09:10 2022 JuanGeneralGeneralCoil Driver and Sat Amp

All three coil driver boards are complete and have been tested. Modification for all 4 sat amp have been completed. Ideally, I would like to finish all the chassis on Monday I have one just about done. 
 

Attachment 1: IMG-5434.jpg
IMG-5434.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG-5421.jpg
IMG-5421.jpg
Attachment 3: IMG-5420.jpg
IMG-5420.jpg
  64   Mon Jul 11 17:39:17 2022 JuanGeneralGeneralCoil driver chassis

Finished all 3 Coil Drover chassis and power lines still need to install the rear cables will do that after I finish Sat Amp chassis tomorrow. 

Attachment 1: IMG-5493.jpg
IMG-5493.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG-5494.jpg
IMG-5494.jpg
  65   Wed Jul 13 13:16:33 2022 JuanGeneralGeneralFinished coil driver and sat amp

I have finished all coil driver and sat amp chassis they all seem to be functioning properly.
 

Attachment 1: IMG-5553.jpg
IMG-5553.jpg
  69   Fri Jul 22 13:47:47 2022 JuanGeneralGeneralUpdate

Just a general update of what I have been up to deriving Lagrange for double pendulum system and also been looking at code that koji gave to me I've add comment to some of the code also working on my report.

  70   Tue Jul 26 14:17:44 2022 JuanGeneralGeneralOSEMS actuators

we have 23 OSEMS they look all full built and I will try and test them this week and or next week.

Attachment 1: IMG-6050.jpg
IMG-6050.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG-6045.jpg
IMG-6045.jpg
Attachment 3: IMG-6044.jpg
IMG-6044.jpg
Attachment 4: IMG-6051.jpg
IMG-6051.jpg
Attachment 5: IMG-6049.jpg
IMG-6049.jpg
Attachment 6: IMG-6046.jpg
IMG-6046.jpg
Attachment 7: IMG-6048.jpg
IMG-6048.jpg
Attachment 8: IMG-6047.jpg
IMG-6047.jpg
  72   Thu Aug 4 11:26:55 2022 JuanGeneralGeneralSat Amp

Sat amp seems to be working just fine. There does seem to be a saturation issue with one of the outputs we may need to change a resistor on the board.

 

 

Attachment 1: IMG-6153.jpg
IMG-6153.jpg
  74   Mon Aug 8 13:00:56 2022 JuanGeneralGeneralSat Amp testing of OSEMS

In the following test, a single Sat Amp chassis that holds Sat Amp Board S1106078 and S1106077

Verification of Sat Amp

First, as the test of the LED driver circuits in the chassis, 8 of various color LEDs were inserted to the appropriate output pins of the chassis. This resulted in all the LED lit and the LED mon TP was confirmed to have voltage outputs of 5V. (See my previous ELOG)

OSEM tests

Connected OSEMs to the sat amp to test the OSEM LED/PD pairs. With the first test, the PD out gave us 15V. We wondered if this was just the problem of the OSEM or circuit, or just there are too much light for the transimpedance gain of 121K Ohm.

By blocking the OSEM light by a random heat shrink tube found on the table, we saw the number got reduced. This indicates that the OSEM/Satamp outputs are working and there are just too much light.

We decided to reduce the gain: The transimpedance gain R18 was reduced to 16k, which gave us a voltage range from 5V~7V  with some outlier OSEMS at 1V (See the attached table)

There are 24 total OSEMs:

  • one apparently not functional
  • 20 fell in the range of 5~7V
  • 3 fell in the range of  ~1V

(These numbers given after the change of R18 to 16k Ohm)

Note: We originally aimed for 8~9V. However, from a previous study of OSEM at cryogenic temperature, we learned that there was about an about 30% increase in the response.
Therefore, we decided to leave a sufficient margin from 10V considering this expected increase in the response.

Attachment 1: OSEMs.xlsx
  75   Mon Aug 15 16:37:51 2022 Juan GeneralGeneralUpdate on Sat Amp and OSEMs

Sat Amp 

- Changes to sat amp 15.8 k ohm resistors instead of 16k The change has been made on Sat Amp - S1103733 & S1103732 ONLY Channel 4 and 2 have been changed on both boards.

OSEM

- I developed a test bed for our OSEM to measure force 

I will attach images of the setup and some of the results from 3 different OSEMs.

Future Work

- For the current test bed, we are using a clear plastic bin although not ideal it manages to get the job done and works for now there could be a better solution for this,
- Next step for OSEM we want to use 40 m single pendulum to test OSEM and measure the transfer function.

Attachment 1: IMG-6458.jpg
IMG-6458.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG-6355.jpg
IMG-6355.jpg
Attachment 3: IMG-6459.jpg
IMG-6459.jpg
Attachment 4: IMG-6460.jpg
IMG-6460.jpg
Attachment 5: OSEMdata.png
OSEMdata.png
  13   Fri May 7 09:57:18 2021 StephenGeneralEquipmentOverall Dimensions for Mariner Suspension Test Chamber Concept

Koji, Stephen

Putting together Koji's design work with Stephen's CAD, we consider the size of a test chamber for the Mariner suspension.

Koji's design uses a 6" x 6" Si optic, with an overall height of about 21.5".

Stephen's offsets suggest a true shield footprint of 14" x 14" with an overall height of 24".

With generous clearances on all sides, a test chamber with a rectangular footprint internally of about 38" x 32" with an internal height of 34" would be suitable. This scale seems similar to the Thomas Vacuum Chamber in Downs, and suggests feasibility. It will be interesting to kick off conversations with a fabricator to get a sense for this.

This exercise generated a few questions worth considering; feel welcome to add to this list!

  • do we need to have the suspended snout(s)?
  • are we studying an ITM or ETM (or both)?
  • relays or other optical components on the baseplate?
  • angles of optical levers?
  • off center mounting?
  • two doors for front/back access?

 

Attachment 1: mariner_suspension_test_chamber_concept.jpg
mariner_suspension_test_chamber_concept.jpg
  18   Wed Jul 7 16:32:27 2021 StephenGeneralEquipmentOverall Dimensions for Mariner Suspension Test Chamber Concept

WIP - Stephen to check on new suspension dimensions and fit into 40m chamber

ELOG V3.1.3-