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Entry  Tue Jul 28 13:33:06 2020, aaron, Update, Lab Work, Rio laser 
    Reply  Tue Jul 28 16:13:56 2020, aaron, Update, Lab Work, Air flow measurement 
Message ID: 2545     Entry time: Tue Jul 28 16:13:56 2020     In reply to: 2544
Author: aaron 
Type: Update 
Category: Lab Work 
Subject: Air flow measurement 

Conclusions

  • I propose we continue scheduling cryo lab use with one individual using the lab per day, and announcing who will be in lab the day before.
    • If needed, this analysis suggests we could schedule two people to use the lab during the same day, but not at the same time. (of course, we are not yet cleared for shared use of the lab)
  • Use the air scrubber near the workstations, or wherever in the lab has stagnant air and prolonged use
  • Increase air circulation in the lab
    • I can order fans this week.
    • Can we open an additional port for air flow out (and possibly in) to the lab? What's behind the old cryo access in the NW corner, could we put a vent for out flow?
    • Change the HEPA filter
  • Before returning the anemometer, perhaps should measure air flow in the interior of the lab.
  • Check out the new cryo lab group and repo(s) on the github!

Cryo lab air flow

Liz dropped off an air scrubber (Medify Airx MA-40) and an anemometer (Digi-sense 20250-15) today. I'm using the instructions on the DCC to measure the air flow and assess the occupancy limits of the cryo lab. I calculate an acceptable amount of time between lab uses, and for two people to occupy the cryo lab simultaneously. For these calculations, I use a conservative threshold of P<1% for the acceptable probability that a second person becomes infected, given one infected lab occupant who sheds virus at 10 nL/min. I measured the dimensions of the lab at about 30x20x10' (l, w, h), for a 6000 ft^3 volume. I expect that's a high estimate, as it doesn't account for things like the awkward geometry of the staircase, volume of lab equipment, or stagnant air inside cabinets.

I measured the air flow at 20 points in a grid covering the surface of the HEPA filter. I also confirmed that there is no measurable air flow into the lab other than at the HEPA filter (eg, at the hole in the ceiling in the NW corner of the lab, or where the RF timing sígnal is sent through wall to Crackle lab). The average air flow through the HEPA filter is 200 CFM (cubic ft / min).
The flow is highest near the edges of the filter--does this indicate it is nearing the end of its life (it's been at least a year since replacement)? The flow is mostly above 200 CFM, but varies from 100-300 CFM across position and time.
 

Result

The first row is the minimum number of minutes to wait between when a (presumably infected) person exits the lab, and when a (presumably uninfected) person can enter the lab to maintain a <1% probability of new infection through aerosolized spread. The second row is the maximum number of person-hours the second and further (presumably uninfected) users can collectively spend in the lab with one presumably infected user, while still keeping a <1% probability of observing any areosolized spread. I don't have Spirou online currently, but I'll eventually put the calculation notebook in a shared folder accessible to the new cryo lab environment repo. Update: it's here.
 
Configuration cloth mask, no scrubber cloth mask, with scrubber N95+, no scrubber N95+,with Scrubber 
Minimum time between occupants (min) 17 7 0 0
Maximum person-hours of shared occupancy (person-hour) 0.004 0.008 0.08 0.15

These results are consistent with what I see for similar types of rooms in the LIGO spreadsheet.

Under an air flow model assuming perfect distribution of air from HVAC and HEPA scrubber throughout the lab, and very conservative requirements for probability of spreading COVID assuming a single lab user is infected, 

  1. Within 6 minutes of an infected user exiting lab, an uninfected person can enter and expect a tolerably low concentration of aerosolized virus.
  2. Within 10 minutes of one infected and one uninfected person working in the lab 6'+ apart with N95 or better masks, the viral load to an uninfected at-risk person may be intolerably high

Furthermore, the air in the lab Is not perfectly distributed. The air intake is several feet from the outflow, both near the door. The primary heat sources are the electronics racks along the N and NW sides of the room. The gradient from 71.1 F at the thermostat to 78 F at the cryocavs rack is uncomfortable to work in and bad for the electronics and optics. It's also too stagnant for the viral load conditions assumed in Evans P2000189 to apply. 

We are not currently cleared for 2+ people to use the lab. This analysis suggests to me that before doing so, we should improve the air flow conditions in the lab. And, even under optimal conditions we may minimize the total time with multiple people in the lab simultaneously.

Rio laser

I disconnected the oscillator, PDH boxes, and laser drivers from the power strip, and powered the strip with the Tenma supply. I had the ground and negative pins switched at first, careful of this -- ground is black, negative is green on this cable.

I plugged in the electronics, but only turned on DC power to the laser driver. I just left them on long enough to confirm a bright green (on viewcard) beam spot for both lasers -- we're in business!

Turned off the lasers, disinfected the common surfaces and objects.

PS, the anti-fog wipes work wonders. My goggles went from fogging in seconds to no fog at all.

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