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ID Date Author Type Categoryup Subject
  2563   Tue Feb 2 22:39:12 2010 JenneUpdatePSLIFO isn't playing nice tonight

[Jenne, Kiwamu]

It's been an iffy last few hours here at the 40m.  Kiwamu, Koji and I were all sitting at our desks, and the computers / RFM network decided to crash.  We brought all of the computers back, but now the RefCav and PMC don't want to lock.  I'm a wee bit confused by this.  Both Kiwamu and I have given it a shot, and we can each get the ref cav to sit and flash, but we can't catch it.  Also, when I bring the PMC slider rail to rail, we see no change in the PMC refl camera.  Since c1psl had been finicky coming back the first time, I tried soft rebooting, and then keying the crate again, but the symptoms remained the same.  Also, I tried burt restoring to several different times in the last few days, to see if that helped.  It didn't.  I did notice that MC2 was unhappy, which was a result of the burtrestores setting the MCL filters as if the cavity were locked, so I manually ran mcdown.  Also, the MC autolocker script had died, so Kiwamu brought it back to life.

Since we've spent an hour on trying to relock the PSL cavities (the descriptive word I'm going to suggest for us is persistent, not losers), we're giving up in favor of waiting for expert advice in the morning.  I suppose there's something obvious that we're missing, but we haven't found it yet......

  2564   Wed Feb 3 01:17:19 2010 KojiUpdatePSLIFO isn't playing nice tonight

I checked the situation from my home and the problem was solved.

The main problem was undefined state of the autolocker and the strange undefined switch states, being associated with the bootfest and burtrestore.

- MC UP/DOWN status shows it was up and down. So I ran scripts/MC/mcup and scripts/MC/mcdown. These cleared the MC autolocker status.

- I had a problem handling the FSS. After mcup/mcdown above, I randomly pushed the "enable/disable" buttons and others, and with some reason, it recovered the handling. Actually it acquired the lock autonomously. Kiwamu may have also been working on it at the same time???

- Then, I checked the PSL loop. I disconnected the loop by pushing the "test" button. The DC slider changes the PZT voltage only 0~+24V. This is totally strange and I started pushing the buttons randomly. As soon as I pushed the  "BLANK"/"NORMAL" button, the PZT output got back under the control.

- Then I locked the PMC, MZ, and MC as usual.

Alberto: You must be careful as the modulations were restored.

Quote:

[Jenne, Kiwamu]

It's been an iffy last few hours here at the 40m.  Kiwamu, Koji and I were all sitting at our desks, and the computers / RFM network decided to crash.  We brought all of the computers back, but now the RefCav and PMC don't want to lock.  I'm a wee bit confused by this.  Both Kiwamu and I have given it a shot, and we can each get the ref cav to sit and flash, but we can't catch it.  Also, when I bring the PMC slider rail to rail, we see no change in the PMC refl camera.  Since c1psl had been finicky coming back the first time, I tried soft rebooting, and then keying the crate again, but the symptoms remained the same.  Also, I tried burt restoring to several different times in the last few days, to see if that helped.  It didn't.  I did notice that MC2 was unhappy, which was a result of the burtrestores setting the MCL filters as if the cavity were locked, so I manually ran mcdown.  Also, the MC autolocker script had died, so Kiwamu brought it back to life.

Since we've spent an hour on trying to relock the PSL cavities (the descriptive word I'm going to suggest for us is persistent, not losers), we're giving up in favor of waiting for expert advice in the morning.  I suppose there's something obvious that we're missing, but we haven't found it yet......

 

  2565   Wed Feb 3 07:57:01 2010 steveUpdatePSLPMC transmission is low

The low PMC transmission alarm was on this morning. The PMC alignment needs a touch up.

Attachment 1: pmct40d.jpg
pmct40d.jpg
  2650   Tue Mar 2 12:20:54 2010 kiwamuUpdatePSLstray beam

In order to block stray beams, I have put some beam dumps and razor blades on the PSL  table.

There were three undesired spots in total. I found two spots on the south side door of the PSL room, close to Mach-Zehnder.

Another spots was on the middle of the north door. Now they all are blocked successfully.

  2690   Sun Mar 21 20:08:20 2010 kiwamu, ranaUpdatePSLEOM wasit size

We are going to set the waist size to 0.1 mm for the beam going through the triple resonant EOM on a new PSL setup.

When we were drawing a new PSL diagram, we just needed to know the waist size at the EOM in order to think about mode matching.

waist.png

This figure shows the relation between the waist size and the spot size at the aperture of the EOM.

The x-axis is the waist size, the y-axis is the spot size. It is clear that there is a big clearance at 0.1 mm waist size. This is good.

Also it is good because the waist size is much above the damage threshold of the EO crystal (assuming 1W input).

The attached file is the python code for making this plot.

Attachment 2: waist.py.zip
  2691   Sun Mar 21 21:02:39 2010 KojiUpdatePSLEOM waist size
You don't need a lengthy code for this. It is obvious that the spot size at the distance L is minimum when L =
zR, where zR is the Rayleigh range. That's all.

Then compare the spot size and the aperture size whether it is enough or not.

It is not your case, but if the damage is the matter, just escape to the large zR side. If that is not possible
because of the aperture size, your EOM is not adequate for your purpose.
  2720   Sun Mar 28 20:05:33 2010 ranaSummaryPSLFSS Work from Sunday: AOM/VCO level set wrong

Just before working on the FSS today, I noticed that the VCO RF output level was set incorrectly.

This should ALWAYS be set so as to give the maximum power in the first order diffracted sideband. One should set this by maximizing the out of lock FSS RFPD DC level to max.

The value was at 2.8 on the VCOMODLEVEL slider. In the attached plot (taken with the FSS input disabled) you can see that this puts us in the regime where the output power to the FSS is first order sensitive to the amplitude noise on the electrical signal to the AOM. This is an untenable situation.

For adjusting the power level to the FSS, we must always use the lamba/2 plate between the AOM and the RC steering mirrors. This dumps power out to the side via a PBS just before the periscope.

Attachment 1: Untitled.png
Untitled.png
  2721   Sun Mar 28 20:51:31 2010 ranaSummaryPSLFSS Work from Sunday: Cavity Suspension is Ridiculously Undamped!

What is the Transfer Function of the suspension of the reference cavity? What were the design requirements? What is the Q and how well does the eddy current damping work? What did Wolfowitz know about the WMD and when? Who cooked the RTV in there and why didn't we use Viton??

To get to the bottom of these questions, today I shook the cavity and measured the response. To read out the pitch and yaw modes separately, I aligned the input beam to be misaligned to the cavity. If the beam is mis-aligned in yaw, for example, the transmitted light power becomes first order sensitive to the yaw motion of the cavity.

In the attached image (10 minute second-trend), you can see the second trends for the transmitted and relfected power. The first ringdown comes from the pitch or vertical mode. The second (shorter) one comes from the yaw misalignment and the yaw shake.

To achieve the up/down shake, I leaned onto the table and pumped it at its eigenfrequency. For the yaw shake, I put two fingers on the RC can's sweater and pushed with several pounds of force at the yaw eigenfrequency (2.6 Hz). For the vertical, I jumped up and down at half the vertical eigenfrequency (4 Hz).

I also made sure that the .SCAN field on these EPICS records were set to 9 so that there is no serious effect from a beating between the eigenfrequency and the EPICS sample rate.

Punchline:

f_vert   = 4 Hz

tau_vert = 90 seconds

Q_vert   = 1000            (yes, that number over there has 3 zeros)

 

f_hor    = 2.6 Hz

tau_hor  = 30 seconds

Q_hor    = 250

 

This is an absurd and probably makes us very sensitive to seismic noise - let's make sure to open up the can and put some real rubber in there to damp it. My guess is that these high Q modes

are just the modes of the last-stage steel spring / pendulum.

Attachment 1: Untitled.png
Untitled.png
  2722   Sun Mar 28 23:17:46 2010 ranaSummaryPSLFSS Work from Sunday: noise spec

This is the error point spectrum - it is filled with huge multiples of ~75 kHz as Yoichi noticed a couple years ago.

I tried to use the netgpib.py package to read out the Agilent 4395, but the SVN had been corrupted by someone saving over the netgpib.py package. To get it to work on rosalba I reverted to the previous version, but whoever is busy hacking on netgpib.py needs to checkin the original package and work on some test code instead.

I also noticed that the default output format for the AG4395.py file is in units of Watts. This is kind of dumb - we need someone to develop this package a little as Yoichi did for the SRS785.

Attachment 1: in2.png
in2.png
  2723   Sun Mar 28 23:47:47 2010 ranaSummaryPSLFSS Work from Sunday: Open Loop Gain

I measured the open loop gain of the FSS (as usual, I have multiplied the whole OLG by 10dB to account for the forward loop gain in the box). I used a source level of -20 dBm and made sure this was not saturating by changing the level.

Its clear that the BW is limited by the resonance at ~1.7 MHz. Does anyone know what that is?

Attachment 1: fssloop.png
fssloop.png
Attachment 2: sweep2.png
sweep2.png
  2724   Mon Mar 29 01:11:33 2010 ranaSummaryPSLFSS Work from Sunday: RF Out Spectrum

I measured the RF spectrum coming out the FSS RFPD to look for saturations - its close to the hairy edge. This is with the 8x power increase from my AOM drive increase. I will increase the FSS's modulation frequency which will lower the Q and gain of the PD to compensate somewhat. The lower Q will also gain us phase margin in the FSS loooop.

 

I put in a bi-directional 20 dB coupler (its only rated down to 30 MHz, but its only off by ~0.3 dB at 21 MHz) between the RFPD and the FSS box. I looked at the time series on the 300 MHz scope and measured the power spectrum.

The peak signal on the scope was 40 mV; that translates to 400 mV at the RFPD output. Depending on whether the series resistor in the box is 20 or 50 Ohms, it means the MAX4107 is close to saturating.

As you can see from the spectrum, its mostly likely to hit its slew rate limit (500 V/us) first. Actually its not going to hit the limit: but even getting within a factor of 10 is bad news in terms of distortion.

Besides the multiples of the modulation frequency, you can see that most of the RMS comes from the strange large peaks at 137.9 and 181.1 MHz. Anyone know what these are from?

TEK00000.PNGTEK00001.PNGTEK00002.PNG

On the middle plot above, I have enabled the 20 MHz BW limit so you can see how much the amplitude goes down when only the 21.5 MHz SB is included. You can also see from the leftmost plot that once in awhile there is some 400mV/10ns slewing. Its within a factor of 10 of the slew rate limit.

Attachment 1: rfout.png
rfout.png
  2726   Mon Mar 29 02:07:50 2010 KojiSummaryPSLFSS Work from Sunday: Open Loop Gain

Quote:

I measured the open loop gain of the FSS (as usual, I have multiplied the whole OLG by 10dB to account for the forward loop gain in the box). I used a source level of -20 dBm and made sure this was not saturating by changing the level.

Its clear that the BW is limited by the resonance at ~1.7 MHz. Does anyone know what that is?

 EO resonance in the RC path?

  2732   Mon Mar 29 21:43:27 2010 AlbertoConfigurationPSLReference Cavity PD Noise Spectrum

[Rana, Alberto]

This evening we measured the noise spectrum of the reference cavity PD used in the FSS loop. From that we estimated the transimpedance and found that the PD is shot-noise limited. We also found a big AM oscillation in correspondence of the FSS modulation sideband which we later attenuated at least in part.

This plot shows the spectrum noise from the RF output of the photodetector.
 
 (here you should be able to see an attached figure, if not it's probably becasue imagemagic has having problems with displaying png files)
2010-03-29_FSS_PD_shotnoise_and_darknoise.png
 
The tall peak at 21.5 MHz is the AM modulation introduced by the EOM. It seems to be caused by a misalignment of the EOM which might be somehow modulating the polarization.
The mount in which the EOM sits is not very solid. We should change it with something similar to that of the other two EOMs in the Mach Zehnder.
By tightening down the plastic screws of the mount Rana reduced the amplitude of the AM modulation by 20dB.
 
The bump in both the dark and shot noise are in corrispondence of the resonance of the PD's electronics. As it appears, the electronics is not well tuned: the bump should coincide with the AM peak.
 
In the case of the dark noise spectrum, the bump is due to the thermal noise of the electronics. It's a good sign: it means that the electronics is good enough to be sensitive to it.
 
Transimpedance Estimate
As a "sanity check" we made an approximate estimate of the transimpedance to make sure that the PD is dominated by shot noise rather than other noises, ie electronic's noise.
 
  1. Supposing that the laser beam hitting the PD was shot noise limited, we measured 1.1V at the DC output. That let us estimate the photocurrent at DC of 20mA, for a 50Ohm output impedance.
  2. The shot noise for 20mA is 80 pA/rtHz
  3. From the nosie spectrum, we measured 3e-7 v/rtHz at 21.5MHz
  4. The impedance at RF is then Z_rf = 3e-7 V/rtHz / 80e-12 pA ~ 4000 Ohm
  5. Since the RF path inside the PD has a gain of 10, the transimpedance is ~400Ohm, which is about as we (ie Rana) remembered it to be.
  6. The PD seems to be working fine.
Attachment 2: 2010-03-29_FSS_PD_shotnoise_and_darknoise.png
2010-03-29_FSS_PD_shotnoise_and_darknoise.png
  2733   Tue Mar 30 06:37:32 2010 ranaConfigurationPSLReference Cavity PD Noise Spectrum

Some more words about the RFAM: I noticed that there was an excess RFAM by unlocking the RC and just looking at the RF out with the 50 Ohm input of the scope. It was ~100 mVp-p! In the end our method to minimize the AM was not so sensible - we aligned the waveplate before the EOM so as to minimize the p-pol light transmitted by the PBS cube just ahead of the AOM. At first, this did not minimize the RFAM. But after I got angry at the bad plastic mounting of the EOM and re-aligned it, the AM seemed to be small with the polarization aligned to the cube. It was too small to measure on the scope and on the spectrum analyzer, the peak was hopping around by ~10-20 dB on a few second timescale. Further reduction would require some kind of active temperature stabilization of the EOM housing (maybe a good SURF project!).

For the EOM mount we (meaning Steve) should replace the lame 2-post system that's in there with one of the mounts of the type that is used in the Mach-Zucker EOMs. I think we have spare in the cabinet next to one of the arms.

After the RFAM monkeying, I aligned the beam to the RC using the standard, 2-mirror, beam-walking approach. You can see from the attached plot that the transmission went up by ~20% ! And the reflection went down by ~30%. I doubt that I have developed any new alignment technique beyond what Yoichi and I already did last time. Most likely there was some beam shape corruption in the EOM, or the RFAM was causing us to lock far off the fringe. Now the reflected beam from the reference cavity is a nice donut shape and we could even make it better by doing some mode matching! This finally solves the eternal mystery of the bad REFL beam (or at least sweeps it under the rug).

At the end, I also fixed the alignment of the RFPD. It should be set so the incident angle of the beam is ~20-40 deg, but it was instead set to be near normal incidence ?! Its also on flimsy plastic legs. Steve, can you please replace this with the new brass ones?

Attachment 1: rc.png
rc.png
  2742   Wed Mar 31 15:31:53 2010 steveUpdatePSLReference Cavity RF PD base upgraded

Quote:

Some more words about the RFAM: I noticed that there was an excess RFAM by unlocking the RC and just looking at the RF out with the 50 Ohm input of the scope. It was ~100 mVp-p! In the end our method to minimize the AM was not so sensible - we aligned the waveplate before the EOM so as to minimize the p-pol light transmitted by the PBS cube just ahead of the AOM. At first, this did not minimize the RFAM. But after I got angry at the bad plastic mounting of the EOM and re-aligned it, the AM seemed to be small with the polarization aligned to the cube. It was too small to measure on the scope and on the spectrum analyzer, the peak was hopping around by ~10-20 dB on a few second timescale. Further reduction would require some kind of active temperature stabilization of the EOM housing (maybe a good SURF project!).

For the EOM mount we (meaning Steve) should replace the lame 2-post system that's in there with one of the mounts of the type that is used in the Mach-Zucker EOMs. I think we have spare in the cabinet next to one of the arms.

After the RFAM monkeying, I aligned the beam to the RC using the standard, 2-mirror, beam-walking approach. You can see from the attached plot that the transmission went up by ~20% ! And the reflection went down by ~30%. I doubt that I have developed any new alignment technique beyond what Yoichi and I already did last time. Most likely there was some beam shape corruption in the EOM, or the RFAM was causing us to lock far off the fringe. Now the reflected beam from the reference cavity is a nice donut shape and we could even make it better by doing some mode matching! This finally solves the eternal mystery of the bad REFL beam (or at least sweeps it under the rug).

At the end, I also fixed the alignment of the RFPD. It should be set so the incident angle of the beam is ~20-40 deg, but it was instead set to be near normal incidence ?! Its also on flimsy plastic legs. Steve, can you please replace this with the new brass ones?

 Teflon feet removed and heavy brass-delrin pd base installed. Ref-cavity reflected light remains to be beautiful doughnut shape on camera.

Attachment 1: brspdbs.JPG
brspdbs.JPG
  2759   Sat Apr 3 11:35:47 2010 ranaConfigurationPSLReference Cavity PD Noise Spectrum

The units on this plot are completely bogus - we know that the thermal noise from the resonant part of the circuit is just V = sqrt(4*k*T*Z) ~ 3nV/rHz. Then the gain of the MAX4107 stage is 10. The output resistor is 50 Ohms, which forms a divide by 2 with the input impedance of the spectrum analyzer and so the bump in the dark noise should only be 15 nV/rHz and not microVolts.

Quote:

[Rana, Alberto]

This evening we measured the noise spectrum of the reference cavity PD used in the FSS loop. From that we estimated the transimpedance and found that the PD is shot-noise limited. We also found a big AM oscillation in correspondence of the FSS modulation sideband which we later attenuated at least in part.

This plot shows the spectrum noise from the RF output of the photodetector.

  2760   Sat Apr 3 16:07:40 2010 AlbertoConfigurationPSLReference Cavity PD Noise Spectrum

 I was aware of a problem on those units since I acquired the data. Then it wasn't totally clear to me which were the units of the data as downloaded from the Agilent 4395A, and, in part, still isn't.

It's clear that the data was in units of spectrum, an not spectral density: in between the two there is a division by the bandwidth (100KHz, in this case). Correcting for that, one gets the following plot for the FSS PD:

2010-03-29_FSS_PD_shotnoise_and_darknoise.png

Although the reason why I was hesitating to elog this other plot is that it looks like there's still a discrepancy of about 0.5dBm between what one reads on the display of the spectrum analyzer and the data values downloaded from it.

However I well know that, I should have just posted it, including my reserves about that possible offset (as I'm doing now).

Quote:

The units on this plot are completely bogus - we know that the thermal noise from the resonant part of the circuit is just V = sqrt(4*k*T*Z) ~ 3nV/rHz. Then the gain of the MAX4107 stage is 10. The output resistor is 50 Ohms, which forms a divide by 2 with the input impedance of the spectrum analyzer and so the bump in the dark noise should only be 15 nV/rHz and not microVolts.

Quote:

[Rana, Alberto]

This evening we measured the noise spectrum of the reference cavity PD used in the FSS loop. From that we estimated the transimpedance and found that the PD is shot-noise limited. We also found a big AM oscillation in correspondence of the FSS modulation sideband which we later attenuated at least in part.

This plot shows the spectrum noise from the RF output of the photodetector.

  2805   Mon Apr 19 05:54:50 2010 ranaConfigurationPSLRC Temperature Servo Turned OFF temporarily

In order to measure the transfer function of the RC cavity's foam, I've turned off the servo so that the room temperature noise can excite it.

The attached plot shows a step response test from 2 weeks ago. Servo is nominally still working fine.

Attachment 1: Untitled.png
Untitled.png
  2810   Mon Apr 19 16:31:42 2010 KevinUpdatePSLInnolight 2W Laser

Koji and Kevin

We unpacked the Innolight 2W laser, took an inventory, and scanned the operations manual.

[Edit by KA]

The scanned PDFs are placed on the following wiki page

http://lhocds.ligo-wa.caltech.edu:8000/40m/Upgrade_09/PSL

We will measure the P-I curve, the mode profile, frequency actuator responses, and so on.

  2812   Tue Apr 20 07:48:42 2010 steveUpdatePSLion pump HV turned on

We found ref-cavity HV was off yesterday afternoon. It was turned back on.

  2822   Tue Apr 20 20:15:37 2010 KevinUpdatePSLInnolight 2W Output Power vs Injection Current

Koji and Kevin measured the output power vs injection current for the Innolight 2W laser.

The threshold current is 0.75 A.

 

The following data was taken with the laser crystal temperature at 25.04ºC (dial setting: 0.12).

Injection Current (A) Dial Setting Output Power (mW)
0.000 0.0 1.2
0.744 3.66 1.1
0.753 3.72 4.6
0.851 4.22 102
0.954 4.74 219
1.051 5.22 355
1.151 5.71 512
1.249 6.18 692
1.350 6.64 901
1.451 7.08 1118
1.556 7.52 1352
1.654 7.92 1546
1.761 8.32 1720
1.853 8.67 1855
1.959 9.05 1989
2.098 9.50 2146

 

Attachment 1: PvsI_2W.jpg
PvsI_2W.jpg
  2828   Wed Apr 21 21:56:27 2010 KevinUpdatePSLInnolight 2W Vertical Beam Profile

Koji and Kevin measured the vertical beam profile of the Innolight 2W laser at one point.

This data was taken with the laser crystal temperature at 25.04°C and the injection current at 2.092A.

The distance from the razor blade to the flat black face on the front of the laser was 13.2cm.

The data was fit to the function y(x)=a*erf(sqrt(x)*(x-x0)/w)+b with the following results.

Reduced chi squared = 14.07

x0 = (1.964 +- 0.002) mm

w  = (0.216 +- 0.004) mm

a  = (3.39  +- 0.03) V

b  = (3.46  +- 0.03) V

Attachment 1: bp2.jpg
bp2.jpg
Attachment 2: bp2.dat
razor height (mm)   Voltage (V)
2.75    6.89
2.50    6.90
2.30    6.89
2.25    6.89
2.20    6.75
2.15    6.47
2.13    6.20
2.10    6.05
2.07    5.88
... 17 more lines ...
  2829   Wed Apr 21 22:11:48 2010 ranaUpdatePSLInnolight 2W Vertical Beam Profile

Back in Gainesville in 1997, I learned how to do this using the chopper wheel. We had to make the assumption that the wheel's blade was moving horizontally during the time of the chop.

One advantage is that the repetitive slices reduces the random errors by a lot - you can trigger the scope and average. Another advantage is that you can download the average scope trace using USB, floppy, or ethernet instead of pencil and paper.

But, I never analyzed it in enough detail to see if there was some kind of nasty systematic error.

  2830   Wed Apr 21 23:35:37 2010 KojiUpdatePSLInnolight 2W Vertical Beam Profile

Good fit. I assumed sqrt(x) is a typo of sqrt(2).

Quote:

Koji and Kevin measured the vertical beam profile of the Innolight 2W laser at one point.

This data was taken with the laser crystal temperature at 25.04°C and the injection current at 2.092A.

The distance from the razor blade to the flat black face on the front of the laser was 13.2cm.

The data was fit to the function y(x)=a*erf(sqrt(x)*(x-x0)/w)+b with the following results.

Reduced chi squared = 14.07

x0 = (1.964 +-  0.002) mm

w = (0.216 +- 0.004) mm

a = (3.39 +- 0.03) V

b = (3.46 +- 0.03) V

 

  2834   Thu Apr 22 21:42:24 2010 AlbertoUpdatePSLInnolight 2W Vertical Beam Profile

 

 What kind of fit did you use? How are the uncertainties in the parameters obtained?

  2837   Sat Apr 24 15:05:41 2010 KevinUpdatePSL2W Vertical Beam Profile

The vertical beam profile of the Innolight 2W laser was measured at eight points along the axis of the laser.

These measurements were made with the laser crystal temperature at 25.04°C and the injection current at 2.091A. z is the distance from the razor blade to the flat black face of the front of the laser.

The voltage from a photodiode was measured for the razor at a number of heights. Except for the first two points, one scan was made with the razor moving down and a second scan was made with the razor moving up. This data was fit to

y = a*erf(sqrt(2)*(x-x0)/w) + b with the following results:

z(cm) (±0.1cm) w(mm) chi^2/ndf
3.9 0.085 ± 0.006 77.09
6.4 0.130 ± 0.004 12.93
8.8 down 0.145 ± 0.008 66.57
8.8 up 0.147 ± 0.008 18.47
11.6 down 0.194 ± 0.010 64.16
11,6 up 0.214 ± 0.009 27.23
14.2 down 0.177 ± 0.008 49.95
14.2 up 0.183 ± 0.007 29.85
16.6 down 0.205 ± 0.006 18.35
16.2 up 0.203 ± 0.007 17.16
19.2 down 0.225 ± 0.007 18.92
19.2 up 0.238 ± 0.011 25.56
21.7 down 0.292 ± 0.006 11.30
21.7 up 0.307 ± 0.008 11.85

The values for w and its uncertainty were estimated with a weighted average between the two scans for the last six points and all eight points were fit to

w = w0*sqrt(1+(z-z0)2/zR2) with the following results:

chi^2/ndf = 17.88

w0 = (0.07 ± 0.13) mm

z0 = (-27 ± 121) mm

zR = (65 ± 93) mm

It looks like all of the data points were made in the linear region so it is hard to estimate these parameters with reasonable uncertainty.

Attachment 1: vbp.jpg
vbp.jpg
  2838   Sat Apr 24 15:50:47 2010 KojiUpdatePSLre: 2W Vertical Beam Profile

1. The vertical axis should start from zero. The horizontal axis should be extended so that it includes the waist. See Zach's plot http://nodus.ligo.caltech.edu:8080/40m/2818

2. Even if you are measuring only the linear region, you can guess w0 and z0, in principle. w0 is determined by the divergence angle (pi w0/lambda) and z0 is determined by the linear profile and w0. Indeed your data have some fluctuation from the linear line. That could cause the fitting prescision to be worse.

3. Probably the biggest reason of the bad fitting would be that you are fitting with three parameters (w0, z0, zR) instead of two (w0, z0). Use the relation ship zR= pi w0^2/lambda.

  2846   Mon Apr 26 16:51:37 2010 KevinUpdatePSLre: 2W Vertical Beam Profile

I tried Koji's suggestions for improving the fit to the vertical beam profile; however, I could not improve the uncertainties in the fit parameters.

I started retaking the data today with the same laser settings used last time and noticed that the photodiode was saturating. We were using an ND 4.0 neutral density filter on the photodiode. Koji and I noticed that the coating on the filter was reduced in the center and added an additional ND 0.6 filter to the photodiode. This seemed to fix the photodiode saturation.

I think that the photodiode was also saturating to a lesser extent when I took the last set of data. I will take another vertical beam profile tomorrow.

[Edit by KA: Metallic coating started being evaporated and the ND filters reduced their attenuation. We decided to use absorptive one as the first incident filter, and put a thinner one behind. This looked fine.]

  2847   Mon Apr 26 17:34:31 2010 KojiUpdatePSLre: 2W Vertical Beam Profile

Give me the plot of the fit, otherwise I am not convinced.

Quote:

I tried Koji's suggestions for improving the fit to the vertical beam profile; however, I could not improve the uncertainties in the fit parameters.

  2851   Tue Apr 27 15:29:16 2010 KevinUpdatePSLre: 2W Vertical Beam Profile

I thought that the micrometer I was using to move the razor through the laser beam was metric; however, it is actually english.

After discovering this mistake, I converted my previous measurements to centimeters and fit the data to

w = sqrt(w0^2+lambda^2*(z-z0)^2/(pi*w0)^2) with the following results:

reduced chi squared = 14.94

z0 = (-4.2 ± 1.9) cm

w0 = (0.013 ± 0.001) cm

Attachment 1: vbp.jpg
vbp.jpg
Attachment 2: vbp_residuals.jpg
vbp_residuals.jpg
  2857   Wed Apr 28 14:22:36 2010 KevinUpdatePSLre: 2W Vertical Beam Profile

I used the Mathematica CurveFit package that we use in Ph6/7 to make the fits for the beam profile data. I wrote two functions that use CurveFit shown in the attachment to make the fits to the error function and square root.

Attachment 1: BeamFit.nb.tar
  2859   Wed Apr 28 16:15:02 2010 KevinUpdatePSLAccelerometer Calibration

Koji, Steve, and Kevin looked into calibrating the Wilcoxon accelerometers. Once calibrated, the accelerometers will be used to monitor the motion of the PSL table.

We want to use the shaker to shake each accelerometer and monitor the motion with an OSEM. We will make a plate to attach an accelerometer to the shaker. A flag will also be mounted on this plate.The OSEM will be mounted on the table next to the shaker and positioned so that the flag can block the LED light as the plate moves up and down. We will then measure the motion of the accelerometer as it is shaken from the OSEM signal. The OSEM signal will be calibrated by keeping the plate and the flag still and moving the OSEM down along the flag a known distance with a micrometer.

  2873   Mon May 3 17:49:41 2010 ranaConfigurationPSLRC Temperature Servo Turned OFF temporarily

Quote:

In order to measure the transfer function of the RC cavity's foam, I've turned off the servo so that the room temperature noise can excite it.

The attached plot shows a step response test from 2 weeks ago. Servo is nominally still working fine.

 I've just now re-enabled the temperature control of the reference cavity can. Trend of the last 8 days is attached.

Attachment 1: rct.png
rct.png
  2875   Tue May 4 02:28:38 2010 ranaConfigurationPSLRC Temperature Servo Turned OFF temporarily

 

 My attempt to passively measure the transfer function of the foam failed fantastically.

As it turns out, the room temperature fluctuations inside the PSL box reach the 1 mK/rHz noise floor of the  AD590 (or maybe the ADC) at ~1-2 mHz. Everything at higher frequencies is noise.

So to see what the foam is doing we will have to do something smarter - we need a volunteer to disable the RC temperature servo from the EPICS screen and then cycle the PSL table lights every hour in the morning.

We'll then use our knowledge of the Laplace transform to get the TF from the step responses.

  2876   Tue May 4 06:32:58 2010 albertoConfigurationPSLRC Temperature Servo Turned OFF temporarily

Quote:

 

 My attempt to passively measure the transfer function of the foam failed fantastically.

As it turns out, the room temperature fluctuations inside the PSL box reach the 1 mK/rHz noise floor of the  AD590 (or maybe the ADC) at ~1-2 mHz. Everything at higher frequencies is noise.

So to see what the foam is doing we will have to do something smarter - we need a volunteer to disable the RC temperature servo from the EPICS screen and then cycle the PSL table lights every hour in the morning.

We'll then use our knowledge of the Laplace transform to get the TF from the step responses.

 more detailed instructions needed....

  2881   Wed May 5 02:37:55 2010 ranaConfigurationPSLRC Temperature Servo Turned OFF temporarily

Quote:

 more detailed instructions needed....

I showed Kiwamu and Alberto how to turn the lights on and off in the PSL. This is why Caltech is such a fine institution: most schools would have TAs delivering this kind of optics instruction.

We've turned off the RC temperature stabilization and the lights will supply the quasi-random heat input to the table and the cavity. Alberto and Kiwamu will be turning the lights on and off at random times.

The attached plot is the spectrum of temperature fluctuations of the room and the vacuum can with no stabilization from this weekend. I think the rolloff above 10 mHz is kind of fake - I had the .SMOO parameter set to 0.99 for both of these channels. I've just now set the .SMOO to 0 for both channels, so we should now see the true ADC or sensor noise level. It should be ~1 mK/rHz.

Attachment 1: Picture_7.png
Picture_7.png
  2883   Wed May 5 16:58:21 2010 KojiUpdatePSL2W hooked up to the interlock service

Ben, Steve, and Koji

Ben came to the 40m and hooked up a cable to the main interlock service.
We have tested the interlock and confirmed it's working.

[Now the laser is approved to be used by persons who signed in the SOP.]

The RC, PMC, and MZ were unlocked during the interlock maneuver.
Now they are relocked.

  2898   Fri May 7 21:55:59 2010 kiwamuUpdatePSLremove Mach-Zehnder

[Koji, Kiwamu]

The Mach-Zehnder on the PSL table was removed.

A path for 166 MHz modulation in the Mach-Zehnder (MZ) was completely removed, the setup for another path remains the same as before.

Also the photo detector and the CCD for the PMC transmittion were moved to behind the PZT mirror of PMC. 

 


Before removing them, we put an aperture in front of the PD for MC REFL so that we can recover the alignment toward MC by using the aperture.

After the removal we tried to re-align the EOM which imposes the sideband of 29MHz for MC.

We eventually got good alignment of 97% transmissivity at the EOM ( the power of the incident beam is 1.193W and trans was 1.160W )

And then we aligned the beam going to MC by guiding the reflected beam to the aperture we put. This was done by using the steering mirrors on the periscope on the corner of the PSL table.

Now MC got locked and is successfully resonating with TEM00.

Attachment 1: NO_MachZehnder_s.jpg
NO_MachZehnder_s.jpg
  2976   Mon May 24 16:34:22 2010 KevinUpdatePSLND Filters for 2W Beam Profile

I tried to measure the beam profile of the 2W laser today but ran into problems with the ND filters. With the measurements I made a few weeks ago, I used a reflective ND 4.0 filter on the PD. The PD started to saturate and Koji and I noticed that a lot of the metallic coating on the filter had been burnt off. Koji told me to use an absorptive ND 4.0 filter in front of a reflective ND 0.6 filter. I tried this today but noticed that a few holes were being burned into the absorptive filter and that the coating on the reflective filter behind it was also being burned off in spots. I don't think we wanted to use a polarizing beam splitter to reduce the power before the PD but I didn't want to ruin any more filters.

  3014   Sun May 30 13:26:07 2010 rana, kiwamuUpdatePSLnew HIGH-LOW value for PMC_TRANS

We changed the HIGH/LOW values of the PMC_TRANS.

The edited file was updated on the svn.


Since the PMC_TRANSPD was replaced behind the pzt mirror (see the entry), its nominal value were reduced to something like ~1V from the previous value of ~2V.

In the medm screen C1PSL_PMC.adl the PMC_TRAN always indicated red because the value were low compared with the previous one.

We went to /cvs/cds/caltech/target/c1psl, then edited psl.db

- Here are the new parameters we set up in the file.

grecord(ai,"C1:PSL-PMC_PMCTRANSPD")
{

  field(LOW,"0.98")
  field(LOLO,"0.93")
  field(HIGH,"1.15")
  field(HIHI,"1.3")

}

- - - -

These values are based on ~4days trend of the PMC_TRAN.

Then we manually updated those numbers by using ezcawrite in order not to reboot C1PSL.

So now it nicely indicates green in the medm screen.

  3016   Sun May 30 15:36:22 2010 AlbertoConfigurationPSLIMC periscope shutter

Two days ago I opened the PSL shutter by switching the switch on the shutter driver. That caused the shutter's switch on the medm screen to work in reversed mode: open meant closed and closed meant open.

I fixed that. Now the medm screen switch state is correct.

  3028   Tue Jun 1 20:40:03 2010 KojiUpdatePSLnew HIGH-LOW value for PMC_TRANS

The alarm had kept crying. I reduced the LOW to be 0.90 and the LOLO to be 0.85 both in psl.db and with ezcawrite.

Quote:

We changed the HIGH/LOW values of the PMC_TRANS.

The edited file was updated on the svn.


Since the PMC_TRANSPD was replaced behind the pzt mirror (see the entry), its nominal value were reduced to something like ~1V from the previous value of ~2V.

In the medm screen C1PSL_PMC.adl the PMC_TRAN always indicated red because the value were low compared with the previous one.

We went to /cvs/cds/caltech/target/c1psl, then edited psl.db

- Here are the new parameters we set up in the file.

grecord(ai,"C1:PSL-PMC_PMCTRANSPD")
{

  field(LOW,"0.98")
  field(LOLO,"0.93")
  field(HIGH,"1.15")
  field(HIHI,"1.3")

}

- - - -

These values are based on ~4days trend of the PMC_TRAN.

Then we manually updated those numbers by using ezcawrite in order not to reboot C1PSL.

So now it nicely indicates green in the medm screen.

 

  3030   Wed Jun 2 03:24:22 2010 KevinUpdatePSL2W Beam Profile

[Rana, Kiwamu, Kevin]

The Innolight 2W beam profile was measured with the beam scan. A W2-IF-1025-C-1064-45P window was used to reflect a small amount of the main beam. A 5101 VIS mirror was used to direct just the beam reflected from the front surface of the W2 down the table (the beam reflected from the back surface of the W2 hit the optic mount for the mirror). A razor blade beam dump was used to stop the main transmitted beam from the W2. The distance from the laser was measured from the front black face of the laser to the front face of the beam scan (this distance is not the beam path length but was the easiest and most accurate distance to measure). The vertical and horizontal beam widths were measured at 13.5% of the maximum intensity (each measurement was averaged over 100 samples). These widths were divided by 2 to get the vertical and horizontal radii.

The mirror was tilted so that the beam was close to parallel to the table. (The center of the beam fell by approximately 2.1 mm over the 474 mm that the measurement was made in).

The measurement was taken with an injection current of 2.004 A and a laser crystal temperature of 25.04°C.

This data was fit to w = sqrt(w0^2+lambda^2*(x-x0)^2/(pi*w0)^2) with lambda = 1064nm with the following results

For the horizontal beam profile:

reduced chi^2 = 4.0

x0 = (-138 ± 3) mm

w0 = (113.0 ± 0.7) µm

For the vertical beam profile:

reduced chi^2 = 14.9

x0 = (-125 ± 4) mm

w0 = (124.0 ± 1.0) µm

In the following plots, the blue curve is the fit to the vertical beam radius, the purple curve is the fit to the horizontal beam radius, * denotes a data point from the vertical data, and + denotes a data point from the horizontal data.

Attachment 1: profile.png
profile.png
Attachment 2: errors.png
errors.png
Attachment 3: Layout.jpg
Layout.jpg
  3032   Wed Jun 2 04:27:02 2010 KojiUpdatePSL2W Beam Profile

This is what I already told to Kevin and Rana:

A direct output beam is one of the most difficult measurements for the mode profiling.
I worried about the thermal lensing.

Since most of the laser power goes through the substrate (BK7) of the W2 window, it may induce thermal deformation on the mirror surface.
An UV fused silica window may save the effect as the thermal expansion coefficient is 0.55e-6/K while BK7 has 7.5e-6.

In addition to the thermal deformation issue, the pick-off setup disables us to measure the beam widths near the laser aperture.

I rather prefer to persist on the razor blade then use the pick off between the blade and the PD.

I also confess that the description above came only from my knowledge, and not from any scientific confirmation including any calculation.
If we can confirm the evidence (or no evidence) of the lensing, it is a great addition to my experience.

Quote:

[Rana, Kiwamu, Kevin]

The Innolight 2W beam profile was measured with the beam scan. A W2-IF-1025-C-1064-45P window was used to reflect a small amount of the main beam. A 5101 VIS mirror was used to direct just the beam reflected from the front surface of the W2 down the table (the beam reflected from the back surface of the W2 hit the optic mount for the mirror). A razor blade beam dump was used to stop the main transmitted beam from the W2. The distance from the laser was measured from the front black face of the laser to the front face of the beam scan (this distance is not the beam path length but was the easiest and most accurate distance to measure). The vertical and horizontal beam widths were measured at 13.5% of the maximum intensity (each measurement was averaged over 100 samples). These widths were divided by 2 to get the vertical and horizontal radii.

The mirror was tilted so that the beam was close to parallel to the table. (The center of the beam fell by approximately 2.1 mm over the 474 mm that the measurement was made in).

The measurement was taken with an injection current of 2.004 A and a laser crystal temperature of 25.04°C.

This data was fit to w = sqrt(w0^2+lambda^2*(x-x0)^2/(pi*w0)^2) with lambda = 1064nm with the following results

For the horizontal beam profile:

reduced chi^2 = 4.0

x0 = (-138 ± 3) mm

w0 = (113.0 ± 0.7) µm

For the vertical beam profile:

reduced chi^2 = 14.9

x0 = (-125 ± 4) mm

w0 = (124.0 ± 1.0) µm

In the following plots, the blue curve is the fit to the vertical beam radius, the purple curve is the fit to the horizontal beam radius, * denotes a data point from the vertical data, and + denotes a data point from the horizontal data.

 

  3040   Wed Jun 2 22:25:39 2010 KevinUpdatePSLLow Power 2W Beam Profile

Koji is worried about thermal lensing introducing errors to the measurement of the 2W beam profile so I measured the profile at a lower power.

I used the same setup and methods used to measure the profile at 2W (see entry). This measurement was taken with an injection current of 1.202 A and a laser crystal temperature of 25.05° C. This corresponds to approximately 600 mW (see power measurement).

The data was fit to  w = sqrt(w0^2+lambda^2*(x-x0)^2/(pi*w0)^2) with the following results

For the horizontal beam profile:

reduced chi^2 = 2.7

x0 = (-203 ± 3) mm

w0 = (151.3 ± 1.0) µm

For the vertical beam profile:

reduced chi^2 = 6.8

x0 = (-223 ± 6) mm

w0 = (167.5 ± 2.2) µm

In the following plots, the blue curve is the fit to the vertical beam radius, the purple curve is the fit to the horizontal beam radius, * denotes a data point from the vertical data, and + denotes a data point from the horizontal data.

The differences between the beam radii for the low power and high power measurements are

Δw0_horizontal = (38.3 ± 1.2) µm

Δw0_vertical = (43.5 ± 2.4) µm

Thus, the two measurements are not consistent. To determine if the thermal lensing is in the laser itself or due to reflection from the W2 and mirror, we should measure the beam profile again at 2W with a razor blade just before the W2 and a photodiode to measure the intensity of the reflection off of the front surface. If this measurement is consistent with the measurement made with the beam scan, this would suggest that the thermal lensing is in the laser itself and that there are no effects due to reflection from the W2 and mirror. If the measurement is not consistent, we should do the same measurement at low power to compare with the measurement described in this entry.


Attachment 1: profile_low.png
profile_low.png
  3041   Wed Jun 2 22:58:04 2010 KevinUpdatePSL2W Second Reflected Beam Profile

[Koji, Kevin]

The profile of the Innolight 2W was previously measured by measuring the reflected beam from the front surface of a W2 window (see entry). To investigate thermal effects, Rana suggested also measuring the profile of the beam reflected from the back surface of the W2.

I used the same setup and methods as were used in the first measurement. The mirror was moved so that only the beam reflected from the back surface of the W2 was reflected from the mirror. This beam was reflected from both the front of the mirror and the back of the mirror. An extra beam dump was positioned to block the reflection from the back of the mirror.

This measurement was made with 2.004 A injection current and 25.04°C laser crystal temperature.

The data was fit to w = sqrt(w0^2+lambda^2*(x-x0)^2/(pi*w0)^2) with the following results

For the horizontal beam profile:

reduced chi^2 = 5.1

x0 = (-186 ± 6) mm

w0 = (125.8 ± 1.4) µm

For the vertical beam profile:

reduced chi^2 = 14.4

x0 = (-202 ± 11) mm

w0 = (132.5 ± 2.7) µm

In the following plots, the blue curve is the fit to the vertical beam radius, the purple curve is the fit to the horizontal beam radius, * denotes a data point from the vertical data, and + denotes a data point from the horizontal data.

The differences between the beam radii for the beam reflected from the front surface and the beam reflected from the back surface are

Δw0_horizontal = (12.8 ± 1.6) µm

Δw0_vertical = (8.5 ± 2.9) µm

So the two measurements are not consistent. This suggests that the passage through the W2 altered the profile of the beam.

Attachment 1: profile_2nd.png
profile_2nd.png
  3042   Thu Jun 3 00:47:17 2010 KevinUpdatePSL2W Beam Profile of Second Reflected Beam

[Koji, Kevin]

The profile of the Innolight 2W was previously measured by measuring the reflected beam from the front surface of a W2 window (see entry). To investigate thermal effects, Rana suggested also measuring the profile of the beam reflected from the back surface of the W2.

I used the same setup and methods as were used in the first measurement. The mirror was moved so that only the beam reflected from the back surface of the W2 was reflected from the mirror. This beam was reflected from both the front of the mirror and the back of the mirror. An extra beam dump was positioned to block the reflection from the back of the mirror.

This measurement was made with 2.004 A injection current and 25.04°C laser crystal temperature.

The data was fit to w = sqrt(w0^2+lambda^2*(x-x0)^2/(pi*w0)^2) with the following results

For the horizontal beam profile:

reduced chi^2 = 5.1

x0 = (-186 ± 6) mm

w0 = (125.8 ± 1.4) µm


For the vertical beam profile:

reduced chi^2 = 14.4

x0 = (-202 ± 11) mm

w0 = (132.5 ± 2.7) µm


In the following plots, the blue curve is the fit to the vertical beam radius, the purple curve is the fit to the horizontal beam radius, * denotes a data point from the vertical data, and + denotes a data point from the horizontal data.

Attachment 1: profile_2nd.png
profile_2nd.png
  3109   Wed Jun 23 18:05:00 2010 KojiConfigurationPSLFSS SLOWDC should be ~-4.0

FSS SLOWDC slider is at around 0.

Please someone relock this at ~-4.0 to exploit some last juice of the fruit.

See this entry for the details of the operating point.

 

Attachment 1: C1PSL_FSS.png
C1PSL_FSS.png
  3110   Wed Jun 23 23:08:30 2010 ranaConfigurationPSLFSS SLOWDC should be ~-4.0

 

  3163   Wed Jul 7 00:15:29 2010 tara,RanaSummaryPSLpower spectral density from RefCav transmitted beam

I measured the RC transmitted light signals here at the 40m. I made all connections through the PSL patch panel.

Other than two steering mirrors in front of the periscope, and the steering mirror for the RFPD which were used to steer

the beam into the cavity and the RFPD respectively, no optics are adjusted.

We re-aligned the beam into the cavity (the DC level increased from 2 V to 3.83V) (Fig2) (We could not recover the power back to what it was 90 days ago)

and the reflected beam to the center of the RFPD.

 

I measured the spectral density of the signal of the transmitted beam behind RefCav in both time and frequency domain.

This will be compared with the result from PSL lab later, so I can see how stable the signal should be.

I did not convert Vrms/rtHz to Hz/rtHz because I only look at the relative intensity of the transmitted beam which will be compared to the setup at PSL lab. 

 

 

 We care about this power fluctuation because we plan to measure

 photo refractive noise on the cavity's mirros

(this is the noise caused by dn/dT in the coatings and the substrate,

the absorption from fluctuating power on the coating/mirror changes

the temperature which eventually changes the effective length of the cavity as seen by the laser.)

      

      The plan is to modulate the power of the beam going into the cavity,

the absorption from ac part will induce frequency noise which we want to see.

Since the transmitted power of the cavity is proportional to the power inside the cavity.

 Fluctuations  from other factors, for example, gain setting,  will limit our measurement. 

That's why we are concerned about the stability of the transmitted beam and made this measurement.


 

Attachment 1: RIN_rftrans.png
RIN_rftrans.png
Attachment 2: tara.png
tara.png
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