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  234   Mon Aug 10 12:09:49 2015 KojiElectronicsAM Stabilized EOM DriverRF AM Measurement Unit E1500151

Still suffering from a power supply issue!

I have been tracking the issues I'm having with the RF AM detector board.

I found that the -5V test point did not show -5V but ~+5V! It seemed that this pin was not connected to -5V but was passive.

I removed the RF AM detector board and exposed the power board again. Pin 11 of P3 interboard connector indeed was not connected to TP12 (-5V). What the hell?

As seen in the attached photo, the PCB pattern for the Pin 11 is missing at the label "!?" and not driven. I soldered a piece of wire there and now Pin11 is at -5V.


This fix actually changed several things. Now the bias setting by the rotary switches works.

Setting BIAS1
 [dBm]   [V]

   0    0.585
   2    0.720
   4    0.897
   6    1.12
   8    1.42
  10    1.79
  12    2.25
  14    2.84
  16    3.60
  18    4.56
  20    5.75
  22    7.37

This allows me to elliminate the saturation of MON1 of the first RF AM detector. I can go ahead to the next step for the first channel.

Now the bias feedback of the second detector is also behaving better. Now TP2 is railing.

Still MON2 is saturated. So, the behavior of the peak detectors needs to be reviewed.

Attachment 1: IMG_20150809_215628585_HDR.jpg
IMG_20150809_215628585_HDR.jpg
  237   Fri Aug 28 01:08:14 2015 KojiElectronicsAM Stabilized EOM DriverRF AM Measurement Unit E1500151 ~ Calibration

Worked on the calibration of the RF AM Measurement Unit.

The calibration concept is as follows:

  • Generate AM modulated RF output
  • Measure sideband amplitude using a network anayzer (HP4395A). This gives us the SSB carrier-sideband ratio in dBc.
  • Measure the output of the RF AM measurement unit with the same RF signal
  • Determine the relationship between dBc(SSB) and the output Vrms.

The AM modulated signal is produced using DS345 function generator. This FG allows us to modulate
the output by giving an external modulation signal from the rear panel. In the calibration, a 1kHz signal with
the DC offset of 3V was given as the external modulation source. The output frequency and output power of
DS345 was set to be 30.2MHz (maximum of the unit) and 14.6dBm. This actually imposed the output
power of 10.346dBm. Here is the result with the modulation amplitude varied

                 RF Power measured             Monitor output
Modulation       with HP4395A (dBm)           Measure with SR785 (mVrms)
1kHz (mVpk)   Carrier    USB      LSB          MON1       MON2
   0.5        9.841    -72.621  -73.325          8.832      8.800
   1          9.99     -65.89   -65.975         17.59      17.52
   2          9.948    -60.056  -59.747         35.26      35.07
   3          9.90     -56.278  -56.33          53.04      52.9
   5          9.906    -51.798  -51.797         88.83      88.57
  10          9.892    -45.823  -45.831        177.6      177.1
  20          9.870    -39.814  -39.823        355.3      354.4
  30          9.8574   -36.294  -36.307        532.1      531.1
  50          9.8698   -31.86   -31.867        886.8      885.2
 100          9.8735   -25.843  -25.847       1772       1769
 150          9.8734   -22.316  -22.32        2656       2652
 200          9.8665   -19.819  -19.826       3542       3539
 300          9.8744   -16.295  -16.301       5313       5308

The SSB carrier sideband ratio is derived by SSB[dBc] = (USB[dBm]+LSB[dBm])/2 - Carrier[dBm]

This measurement suggests that 10^(dBc/20) and Vrms has a linear relationship. (Attachment 1)
The data points were fitted by the function y= a x.

=> 10^dBc(SSB)/20 = 108*Vrms (@10.346dBm input)


Now we want to confirm this calibration.

DS345 @30.2MHz was modulated with the DC offset + random noise. The resulting AM modulated RF was checked with the network analyzer and the RFAM detector
in order to compare the calibrated dBc/Hz curves.

A) SR785 was set to produce random noise
B) Brought 2nd DS345 just to produce the DC offset of -2.52V (Offset display -1.26V)
Those two are added (A-B) by an SR560 (DC coupling, G=+1, 50 Ohm out).
The output was fed to Ext AM in DS345(#1)

DS345(#1) was set to 30.2MHz 16dBm => The measured output power was 10.3dBm.

On the network analyzer the carrier power at 30.2MHz was 9.89dBm

Measurement 1) SR785     1.6kHz span 30mV random noise (observed flat AM noise)
Measurement 2) SR785   12.8kHz span 100mV random noise (observed flat AM noise)
Measurement 3) SR785 102.4kHz span 300mV random noise (observed cut off of the AM modulation due to the BW of DS345)

The comparison plot is attached as Attachment 2. Note that those three measurements are independent and are not supposed to match each other.
The network analyzer result and RFAM measurement unit output should agree if the calibration is correct. In fact they do agree well.

 

Attachment 1: RFAM_detector_calib.pdf
RFAM_detector_calib.pdf
Attachment 2: RFAM_detector_calib_spectra.pdf
RFAM_detector_calib_spectra.pdf
  238   Fri Aug 28 02:14:53 2015 KojiElectronicsAM Stabilized EOM DriverRF AM Measurement Unit E1500151 ~ 37MHz OCXO AM measurement

In order to check the noise level of the RFAM detector, the power and cross spectra for the same signal source
were simultaneously measured with the two RFAM detectors.


As a signal source, 37MHz OCXO using a wenzel oscillator was used. The output from the signal source
was equaly splitted by a power splitter and fed to the RFAM detector CHB(Mon1) and CHA(Mon2).

The error signal for CHB (Mon1) were monitored by an oscilloscope to find an appropriate bias value.
The bias for CHA are adjusted automatically by the slow bias servo.

The spectra were measured with two different power settings:

Low Power setting: The signal source with 6+5dB attenuation was used. This yielded 10.3dBm at the each unit input.
The calibration of the low power setting is dBc = 20*log10(Vrms/108). (See previous elog entry)

High Power setting: The signal source was used without any attenuation. This yielded 22.4dBm at the each unit input.
The calibration for the high power setting was measured upon the measurement.
SR785 was set to have 1kHz sinusoidal output with the amplitude of 10mVpk and the offset of 4.1V.
This modulation signal was fed to DS345 at 30.2MHz with 24.00dBm
The network analyzer measured the carrier and sideband power levels
30.2MHz 21.865dBm
USB    -37.047dBm
LSB    -37.080dBm  ==> -58.9285 dBc (= 0.0011313)

The RF signal was fed to the input and the signal amplitude at Mon1 and Mon2 were measured
MON1 => 505   mVrms => 446.392 Vrms/ratio
MON2 => 505.7 mVrms => 447.011 Vrms/ratio
dBc = 20*log10(Vrms/446.5).


Using the cross specrum (or coherence)of the two signals, we can infer the noise level of the detector.

Suppose there are two time-series x(t) and y(t) that contain the same signal s(t) and independent but same size of noise n(t) and m(t)

x(t) = n(t) + s(t)
y(t) = m(t) + s(t)

Since n, m, s are not correlated, PSDs of x and y are

Pxx = Pnn + Pss
Pyy = Pmm+Pss = Pnn+Pss

The coherence between x(t) and y(t) is defined by

Cxy = |Pxy|^2/Pxx/Pyy = |Pxy|^2/Pxx^2

In fact |Pxy| = Pss. Therefore

sqrt(Cxy) = Pss/Pxx

What we want to know is Pnn

Pnn = Pxx - Pss = Pxx[1 - sqrt(Cxy)]
=> Snn = sqrt(Pnn) = Sxx * sqrt[1 - sqrt(Cxy)]

This is slightly different from the case where you don't have the noise in one of the time series (e.g. feedforward cancellation or bruco)


Measurement results

 

Power spectra:
Mon1 and Mon2 for both input power levels exhibited the same PSD between 10Hz to 1kHz. This basically supports that the calibration for the 22dBm input (at least relative to the calibration for 10dBm input) was corrected. Abobe 1kHz and below 10Hz, some reduction of the noise by the increase of the input power was observed. From the coherence analysis, the floor level for the 10dBm input was -178, -175, -155dBc/Hz at 1kHz, 100Hz, and 10Hz, respectively. For the 22dBm input, they are improved down to -188, -182, and -167dBc/Hz at 1kHz, 100Hz, and 10Hz, respectively.

 

Attachment 1: OCXO_AM_noise.pdf
OCXO_AM_noise.pdf
  240   Tue Sep 8 10:55:31 2015 KojiElectronicsAM Stabilized EOM DriverRF AM Measurement Unit E1500151 ~ 37MHz OCXO AM measurement

Test sheet: https://dcc.ligo.org/LIGO-E1400445

Test Result (S1500114): https://dcc.ligo.org/S1500114

  346   Thu Apr 18 20:47:54 2019 JoeOptics OMC initial alignment and locking

[Joe, Phillip, Koji, Stephen]

*draft post, please add anymore info if I missed something*

  • made initial alignment of the cavity. To do this we used the periscope mirrors to aim the incoming beam at the centre of the first mirror and second (1st curved mirror) mirror. Using the micrometers (initial positions was 0.20mm), we moved the first curved mirror so that it hit the third mirror. We then used a combination of the periscope and first curved mirror movements to start seeing 2 or 3 round trips. micrometer was set to roughly 0.11mm. We then only used  periscope mirrors to align the beam into the cavity.
  • We set up a wincam at the transmission of the cavity. This was a useful was of seeing what mode was being transmitted through the cavity. We walked the beam with the periscope mirrors until we saw flashes of the TM00 mode.
  • Once the cavity was transmitting TM00 modes, we started to lock it. Once it was locked we looked at the the spot positions of beam on the mirrors. Phillip looked with an IR viewer and could see that the spots were too high on both the curved mirrors
  • We set up a CCD to capture an image of this. Two post holders have been left in place for easy movement of the CCD.

General notes about working with this set up. The lens on the CCD can come off quite easily, as you just change how much its screwed on to change the focus. Care should be taken that you don't know the template with this as well, as the camera is quite close to the template (and near the edge of the bench!). Also be mindful of the PZT wires, as they can pull the mirrors out of position.

Attachment 1 shows the position of the spots on the mirrors A14 and PZT11. The spots are about 3mm ish from the centre of the curved mirror in the vertical and horizontal direction. 

Attachment 2 sketch of mirror positions.

Attachment 3 shows the postion of the spot on PZT13. The spot is less near the edge than on PZT11, but its still 2mm ish from the centre of the curved mirror in both directions.

To move the beam horizontally we can use the alignment matrix in appendix C of T1500060. However since we don't have control over the pitch of the mirrors, moving the spots down could require us to inspect the glass breadboard/prisms for dust. We suspect that PZT could be the culprit, as we could not see newtonian rings between its base and the glass breadboard. One way to test this idea is just to clean the bottom of the PZT with acetone, and see if that improves the spot position. If we don't have to do any work to realign it, then this was not the issue.

Koji pointed out that the spot in attachment 1 is very near the edge of the optic, so shifting the beam horizontally could also fix the vertical issue. 

Attachment 1: IMG_7676.JPG
IMG_7676.JPG
Attachment 2: IMG_7666.JPG
IMG_7666.JPG
Attachment 3: IMG_7670.JPG
IMG_7670.JPG
Attachment 4: IMG_7883.JPG
IMG_7883.JPG
Attachment 5: IMG_7882.JPG
IMG_7882.JPG
  347   Fri Apr 19 09:21:07 2019 PhilipOptics Cleaning of OMC optics

ach[Joe, Phillip, Koji, Stephen]

Work from 17.04.2019

First contact cleaning of OMC optics
We cleaned the OMC optic with first contact. After a first cleaning run all mirrors except for two looked
fine. One had some first contact residuals on the left at center height and another had some particle sitting
near the center area. As the ionized nitrogen gun didn't help we applied another round of first contact which resolved
the two issues. Unfortutanely the second run of cleaning again left some residuals of first contact at the edges.
We were able to peal these off with tweezers.

Placement of Optics at the breadboard
We cleaned the contact surfaces for the bonds using optic wipes and pure isopropanol. The placement wen't well for 3 of the 5 optics (low number of newtonian rings).
One was recleaned and placed on the breadboard again which seemed fine. For the 5th no newtonian rings could be seen (either verry ood or bad) we planed on trying it in the current set-up. Mirrors used can be seen in attachment 3.

 

Attachment 1: IMG_7877.JPG
IMG_7877.JPG
Attachment 2: IMG_7883.JPG
IMG_7883.JPG
Attachment 3: IMG_7884.JPG
IMG_7884.JPG
  348   Fri Apr 19 09:35:28 2019 JoeGeneral Adjusting cavity axis, re-alignment of OMC and locking

[koji,philip, joe, liyuan, steven]

*still need to add photos to post*

PZT 11 was removed and inspected for so dust/dirt on the bottom of the prism. We saw a spot. We tried to remove this with acetone, but it stayed there. (Attachment 2, see the little white spec near the edge of the bottom surface of the prism)

current micrometer positions:

  • CM1: one closest to centre 11, close to edge 35 marking
  • CM2: both at 20 marking

Swapped PZT for PZT 22, cleaned the bottom and put it into position of CM1. We saw a low number of newton rings, so this is good.

We got a rough initial alignment by walking the beam with the periscope and PZT 22  mirrors. Once we saw a faint amount of transmission, we set up the wincam at the output. The reflected light from the cavity could also be seen to be flashing as the laser frequency was being modulated. 

Once it was roughly aligned, using the persicope we walked the beam until we got good 00 flashes. We checked the positions of the spots on the mirror with the beam card. This looked a lot better in the verticle direction (very near the centre) on both curved mirrors. We locked the cavity and contiued to align it better. This was done with the periscope until the DC error signal was about 0.6V. We switched to the fibre coupler after this. 

Once we were satisfied that he cavity was near where it would be really well aligned, we took some images of the spot positions. Using these we can work out which way to move the curved mirrors. Koji worked this out and drew some diagrams, we should attach them to this post. [Diagram: See Attachment 1 of ELOG OMC 350]

We made the corrections to the cavity mirrors

  • CM1: one closest to centre 11, close to edge 35+16 marking
  • CM2: I can't remember exactly, Koji created a diagram which would help explain this step [Diagram: See Attachment 2 of ELOG OMC 350]

The scatter from CM1 looked very small, it was hard to see with a viewer or CCD. We had to turn up the laser power by a factor of 3 to begin to see it, indicating that this is a good mirror.

Once this was done, the spot positions looked uch nearer the centre of each mirror. They look pitched 1mm too high, which might be because of the bottom surfaces of the prisms having a piece of dust on them? For now though it was good enough to try take the detuned locking FSR measurement and RFAM measurement. 

To see the higher order mode spacing, we misaligned them incoming beam in pitch and yaw so that the TM10 and TM01 modes were excited. The cavity transmission beam was aligned onto the photodiode such that we could make a transfer function measurement (i.e. shift the beam along the photodiode so that only half of the beam was on it, this maximises the amount of photocurrent).

attachment 1 shows the fitting of the detuned locking method for measuring FSR and cavity length/

I saved this data on my laptop. When I next edit this post (hopefully I will before monday, although I might be too tired from being a tourist in california...) I want to upload plots of the higher order mode spacing.

 

 

Attachment 1: FSR_Scan_Fitfsrdata.pdf
FSR_Scan_Fitfsrdata.pdf
Attachment 2: IMG_7679_cropped.jpg
IMG_7679_cropped.jpg
  349   Fri Apr 19 11:34:19 2019 KojiOptics OMC initial alignment and locking

The spot on CM1 was found displaced by 3.4mm (horiz.) and 3.0mm (vert.) in the upper right direction looking from the face side.
The spot on CM2 was found displaced by 1.2mm (horiz.) and 1.8mm (vert.) in the upper left direction looking from the face side.

The drawing on the left side of the attachment shows the estimated misalignment when we think they all come from the curved mirrors.
As for the yaw misalignment, CM1 and CM2 were 3.9mrad and 5.6mrad rotated (misaligned) in CW, respectively.
As for the pitch misalignment, CM1 and CM2 has 1.7mrad (narrowing) and 3.5mrad (widening), respectively. We have no adjustment for this.
Let's say if this comes from the dusts on the bottom of the prisms, CM1 has ~17um one, and CM2 has ~35um one beneath them. The question is if we can believe this or not? This should be checked with the Newton fringes we can see at the bottom of the prisms.

Attachment 1: misalignment1.pdf
misalignment1.pdf
  351   Mon Apr 22 09:54:21 2019 JoeGeneral Shortening cavity (A5,A14,PZT11,PZT22) to get closer to design FSR

[Koji,Joe,Philip,stephen]

in units 20um per div on the micrometer [n.b. we reailised that its 10um per div on the micrometer]

CM1 inner screw pos: 11.5

cm1 outer screw pos: 33.5

cm2 inner screw pos: 11

cm2 outer screw pos: 13

the cavity is currently 3mm too long, move each mirror closer by 0.75mm

CM1 inner screw pos: 11.5+37.5 = 49

cm1 outer screw pos: 33.5+37.5= 71

cm2 inner screw pos: 11+37.5 = 48.5

cm2 outer screw pos: 13+37.5 = 50.5

The screws on the micrometers were adjusted to these values.

cleaned cm1 (PZT 11). There was a mark near the edge which we were not able to remove with acetone. On the breadboard there were 3 spots which we could not remove with acetone. Once we wiped the mirror and breadboard we put the mirror back. 

FM2 (A5). The prism looked quite bad when inspected under the green torch, with lots of lines going breadthways. We thought about replacing this with A1, however this has had the most exposure to the environment according to koji. This has a bit of negative pitch, so would bring down the beam slightly. We decided to continue to use A5 as it had worked fairly well before. The breadboard was cleaned, we could see a few spots on it, they were cleaned using acetone.

FM1 (A14). Near the edge of the bottom surface of the prism we could see some shiny marks, which may have been first contact. We attempted to scrape them off we tweezers. The breadboard looked like it had a few marks on it. These were hard to remove with the acetone, it kept leaving residue marks. We used isopropanol to clean this now, which worked much better. The sharp edges of the breadboard can cause the lens tissue to tear a bit, so it took a few rounds of cleaning before it looked good to put a prism on. The mirror was put back onto the breadboard. 

The cavity was aligned, then we realised that 1 turn is 500um, so its still too long (1.75mm long). The FSR was 264.433Mhz, which is 

CM2 still showed quite a bit more scattering than CM1, so we want to move this beam.

CM1:

  • inner = 0.405mm
  • outer = 0.67mm

CM2

  • inner = 0.507mm
  • outer = 0.42mm

want to increase by 1.7/4 = 0.425, so

CM1:

  • inner = 0.405+ 0.425 mm = 0.83 mm
  • outer = 0.67+ 0.425mm = 1.095 mm

CM2

  • inner = 0.507 + 0.425mm = 0.932 mm
  • outer = 0.42 + 0.425mm = 0.845 mm

we tried to align the cavity, however the periscope screws ran out of range, so we changed the mircometers on CM2. We tried this for quite some time, but had problems with the beam reflected from the cavity clipping the steering mirror on the breadboard (to close to the outer edge of the mirror). This was fixed by changing the angle of the two curved mirrors. (We should include a diagram to explain this).

The cavity was locke, the FSR was measured using the detuned locking method, and we found that the FSR = 264.805 MHz, which corresponds to a cavity length of 1.1321m

we took some photos, the spot is quite far to the edge of the mirrors (3 to 4mm), but its near the centre vertically. photos are 

123-7699 = CM2

123-7697 = CM1

 

 

Attachment 1: CM1_IMG_7699.jpg
CM1_IMG_7699.jpg
Attachment 2: CM2_IMG_7697.jpg
CM2_IMG_7697.jpg
  352   Mon Apr 22 19:54:28 2019 KojiGeneral OMC(004): Spot positions at the end of Apr 22nd
Attachment 1: misalignment4.pdf
misalignment4.pdf
ELOG V3.1.3-