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  OMC elog, Page 8 of 9  Not logged in ELOG logo
ID Date Author Typeup Category Subject
  291   Thu Feb 22 20:21:02 2018 KojiOpticsCharacterizationaLIGO EOM test

POSTED to 40m ELOG

  292   Mon Apr 2 17:27:04 2018 KojiOpticsCharacterizationaLIGO EOM test

2nd optical test http://nodus.ligo.caltech.edu:8080/40m/13725

  294   Sat May 5 22:51:04 2018 KojiOpticsGeneral3IFO EOM Optical test

The 3IFO EOM test performed at the 40m. Result: 40m ELOG 13819

  295   Tue May 15 19:53:45 2018 KojiOpticsGeneralEOM Q comparison

Qs' were estimated with a lorentzian function (eye fit)

aaa

Current LHO EOM (final version, modulation depth measurement 2018/4/5)
f0=9.1MHz, Q=18
f0=45.38MHz, Q=46
f0=118.05MHz, Q=30

Prev LHO EOM (RF transmission measurement 2018/4/13)
f0=9.14MHz, Q=53
f0=24.25MHz, Q=55
f0=45.565MHz, Q=62;

3IFO EOM (RF transmission measurement 2018/4/23)
f0=8.627MHz, Q=53
f0=24.075MHz, Q=60
f0=43.5MHz, Q=65

  297   Wed May 30 17:44:23 2018 KojiOpticsCharacterization3IFO EOM surface check

3IFO EOM dark microscope images courtesy by GariLynn and Rich

Attachment1/2: Hole #1
Attachment3/4: Hole #2
Attachment5: Hole #2

Attachment 1: IMG_5756.JPG
IMG_5756.JPG
Attachment 2: IMG_5757.JPG
IMG_5757.JPG
Attachment 3: IMG_5758.JPG
IMG_5758.JPG
Attachment 4: IMG_5759.JPG
IMG_5759.JPG
Attachment 5: Looking_at_Hole2.png
Looking_at_Hole2.png
  308   Sun Sep 23 19:42:21 2018 KojiOpticsGeneralMontecarlo simulation of the phase difference between P and S pols for a modeled HR mirror

[Koji Gautam]


With Gautam's help, I ran a coating design code for an HR mirror with the standard quarter-wave design. The design used here has 17 pairs of lambda/4 layers of SiO2 and Ta2O5 (=34 layers) with the fused silica as the substrate to realize the transmission of tens of ppm. At the AOI (angle of incidence) of 4 deg (=nominal angle for the aLIGO OMC), there is no significant change in the reflectivity (transmissivity). With 95% of the case, the phase difference at the AOI of 4 deg is smaller than 0.02 deg for given 1% fluctuation (normal distribution) of the layer design and the refractive indeces of the materials. Considering the number of the OMC mirrors (i.e. 4), the total phase shift between P and S pols is less than 0.08 deg. This makes P and S resonances matched well within 1/10 of the cavity resonant width (360/F=0.9deg, F: Finesse=400).

Of course, we don't know how much layer-thickness fluctuation we actually have. Therefore, we should check the actual cavity resonance center of the OMC cavity for the polarizations.

Attachment 1 shows the complex reflectivity of the mirror for P and S pols between AOIs of 0 deg and 45 deg. Below 30 deg there is no significant difference. (We need to look at the transmission and the phase difference)

Attachment 2 shows the power transmissivity of the mirror for P and S pols between AOIs of 0 deg and 45 deg. For the purpose to check the robustness of the reflectivity, random fluctuations (normal distribution, sigma = 1%) were applied to the thicknesses of each layer, and the refractive indices of Silica and Tantala. The blue and red bands show the regions that the 90% of the samples fell in for P and S pols, respectively. There are median curves on the plot, but they are not well visible as they match with the ideal case. This figure indicates that the model coating well represents the mirror with the transmissivity better than 70ppm.

Attachment 3 shows the phase difference of the mirror complex reflectivity for P and S pols between AOIs of 0deg and 45deg. In the ideal case, the phase difference at the AOI of 4deg is 1x10-5 deg. The Monte-Carlo test shows that the range of the phase for 90% of the case fell into the range between 5x10-4 deg and 0.02 deg. The median was turned to be 5x10-3 deg.

Attachment 4 shows the histogram of the phase difference at the AOI of 4deg. The phase difference tends to concentrate at the side of the smaller angle.

Attachment 1: reflectivities.png
reflectivities.png
Attachment 2: transmission.png
transmission.png
Attachment 3: phase_diff.png
phase_diff.png
Attachment 4: phase_difference_histogram.png
phase_difference_histogram.png
  309   Thu Sep 27 20:19:15 2018 AaronOpticsGeneralMontecarlo simulation of the phase difference between P and S pols for a modeled HR mirror

I started some analytic calculations of how OMC mirror motion would add to the noise in the BHD. I want to make some prettier plots, and am adding the interferometer so I can also compute the noise due to backscatter into the IFO. However, since I've pushed the notebook I wanted to post an update. Here's the location in the repo.

I used Koji's soft limit of 0.02 degrees additional phase accumulation per reflection for p polarization.

  310   Thu Nov 1 19:57:32 2018 AaronOpticsGeneralMontecarlo simulation of the phase difference between P and S pols for a modeled HR mirror

I'm still not satisfied/done with the solution to this, but this has gone too long without an update and anyway probably someone else will have a direction to take it that prevents me spinning my wheels on solved or basic questions.

The story will have to wait to be on the elog, but I've put it in the jupyter notebook. Basically:

  • I considered the polarization-separated OMC in several configurations. I have plots of DARM referred noise (measured free-running and controlled noise for the current OMC, thermal theoretical noise curve, scattered light) for the case of such an OMC with one lambda/2 waveplate oriented at 45 degrees. This is the base case.
  • I also considered such an OMC with a lambda/2 both before and after the OMC, where their respective polarization axes can be arbitrary (I look at parameter space near the previous case's values).
    • I optimize the BHD angle to balance the homodyne (minimize the E_LO^2 term in the homodyne readout).
    • I then optimize the rotations of the lambda/2 polarization axes to minimize the noise
    • For the optimum that is closest to the base case, I also plotted DARM referred length noise.

 

It's clear to me that there is a way to optimize the OMC, but the normalization of my DARM referred noise is clearly wrong, because I'm finding that the input-referred noise is at least 4e-11 m/rt(Hz). This seems too large to believe. 

Indeed, I was finding the noise in the wrong way, in a pretty basic mistake. I’m glad I found it I guess. I’ll post some plots and update the git tomorrow. 

  311   Thu Jan 10 20:42:54 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationFSR / HOM Test of OMC SN002

OMC SN002 = Former LHO OMC which CM1 was destroyed by the lock loss pulse in 2016. This OMC needs to be optically tested before storage.

The test items:

  • [done] FSR measurement with offset PDH locking (FM->AM conversion)
  • [done] FSR/finesse measurement with the EOM RFAM injection
  • [done] TMS measurement with input miaslignment and the trans RFPD misalignment: with no PZT offset
  • [done] TMS measurement with input miaslignment and the trans RFPD misalignment: with PZT offsets
     
  • PZT response
  • Mirror cleaning
  • Power budget
  • Diode alignment: shim height
  • PD/QPD alignment
  312   Thu Jan 10 20:45:00 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationPZT test cable

As OMC SN002 already has the PZTs connected to the Mighty-Mouse connector, a test cable with a female mighty-mouse connector was made.

A small imperfection: When the cable was inserted to the connector shell, I forgot to mirror the pin out. Therefore the color and pin number do not match.

Attachment 1: OMC_PZT_wiring.pdf
OMC_PZT_wiring.pdf
  313   Sat Jan 12 22:49:11 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationPM-SM patch cable mode cleaning effect

Mode cleaning capability of an optical fiber was measured. The conclusion is that the leakage of the non-fiber mode to the fiber output is insignificant and also practically negligible.

The tested fiber was Thorlabs 5-m Polarization Maintaining Single-Mode fiber (P3-1064PM-FC-5, PM Patch Cable, PANDA, 1064 nm, FC/APC, 5m).

The output mode cleaner was used as a mode analyzer. The fiber input was aligned and the misaligned so that the amount of higher order mode for the fiber is changed. The fiber output has been mode matched to an output mode cleaner. Therefore excess mode mismatch when the fiber input was misaligned, was accounted as the leakage higher order mode.

For each alignment state, the OMC transmission (in V), the OMC reflection (in V), and the OMC reflection with the OMC unlocked were measured. The voltages were measured with a digital multimeter (non-portable unit). With the fiber input beam aligned to the fiber, the fiber input and output powers were measured with a power meter.

With the input beam aligned
- Fiber input: 52.5 +/- 0.2 [mW]
- Fiber output: 35.5 +/- 0.2 [mW] (~68% coupling)
- Reflection PD offset: -0.00677 +/- 0.00001 [V]

- Refl PD reading with the OMC unlocked: 6.32 +/- 0.01 [V]
- Refl PD reading with the OMC locked: 0.133 +/- 0.002 [V]
- OMC Trans PD with the OMC locked: -1.72 +/- 0.01 [V] 

With the input beam misaligned
- Refl PD reading with the OMC unlocked: 3.63 +/- 0.01 [V]
- Refl PD reading with the OMC locked: 0.0752 +/- 0.001 [V]
- OMC Trans PD with the OMC locked: -1.00 +/- 0.01 [V] 

The naive mode matching was 0.9779 +/- 0.0003 and 0.9775 +/- 0.0003 without and with misalignment. We initially had roughly 17mW of non-fiber mode incident. And it was increased by roughly 15mW. For the misaligned case, the amount of the OMC-matched carrier was also reduced due to the misalignment. So the actual fiber mode cleaning effect needs more careful quantitative analysis.


The power budget at each part of the setup was modeled as shown in Attachment 1. The blue numbers are the measured values.
The factor a is the ratio of the leakage non-fiber mode into the fiber transmission.
The factor (1-b) is the mode matching of the fiber mode into the OMC mode.

\begin{align} P_{\rm omcrefl} & = a P_{\rm nofib} + b P_{\rm fib} \nonumber \\ P_{\rm fibout} & = P_{\rm omcrefl} + (1-b) P_{\rm fib} \nonumber \\ P_{\rm tot} & = P_{\rm nofib} + P_{\rm fib} \nonumber \end{align}

and

\begin{align} P'_{\rm omcrefl} &= a P'_{\rm nofib} + b P'_{\rm fib} \nonumber \\ P'_{\rm fibout} &= P'_{\rm omcrefl} + (1-b) P'_{\rm fib} \nonumber \\ P_{\rm tot} &= P'_{\rm nofib} + P'_{\rm fib} \nonumber \end{align}

With the calibration between the refl PD and the power meter measurement,
  \begin{align} P_{\rm tot} &= 52.5 \pm 0.2 {[mW]} \nonumber \\ P_{\rm fibout} &= 35.5 \pm 0.2 {\rm [mW]} \nonumber \end{align}
\begin{align} P_{\rm omcrefl} &= 0.78 \pm 0.01\,\,{\rm [mW]} \nonumber \\ P'_{\rm omcrefl} &= 0.460 \pm 0.006\,\,{\rm [mW]} \nonumber \\ P'_{\rm fibout} &= 20.4 \pm 0.13 \,\,{\rm [mW]} \nonumber \end{align}

The solution of the equations is
\begin{align} a &= (4 \pm 4) \times 10^{-4} \nonumber \\ b &= 0.0219 \pm 0.0005 \nonumber \end{align}

So, the leakage of the non-fiber mode to the fiber output is insignificant. Moreover, the number is practically negligible because the mismatching between the fiber and OMC modes is of the order of percent and dominated by the aberration of the collimator (i.e. the OMC reflection looks like concentric higher-order LG modes) with the order of 1~2%.
 

Attachment 1: fiber_mode_cleaning.pdf
fiber_mode_cleaning.pdf
  315   Sat Feb 2 16:17:13 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationSummary: OMC(001) HOM structure recalculation

Each peak of the transfer function measurement was fitted again with a complex function:

\begin{align} h(f;a_{\rm r}, a_{\rm i}, f_0, dT, \Gamma, a_0, b_0, a_1, b_1) & \nonumber\\ = (a_{\rm r} + i a_{\rm i}) e^{-i 2 \pi f dT} \frac{1}{1 + i (f - f_0)/\Gamma} &+ (a_0 + i b_0) + (a_1 + i b_1)f \nonumber \end{align}


OMC (001)
History:
Measurement date 2013/5/31, Installed to L1 2013/6/10~

Attachment 1: OMC_HOM_130531.pdf
OMC_HOM_130531.pdf
Attachment 2: HOM_PZTV.pdf
HOM_PZTV.pdf
Attachment 3: HOM_plot_PZT0_0.pdf
HOM_plot_PZT0_0.pdf
Attachment 4: Cav_scan_response_HOM.pdf
Cav_scan_response_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_HOM.pdf
  316   Sat Feb 2 20:03:19 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationSummary: OMC(002) HOM structure recalculation (before mirror replacement)

OMC (002)
History:
Measurement date 2013/10/11, Installed to L1 2013/XX

Attachment 1: OMC_HOM_131011.pdf
OMC_HOM_131011.pdf
Attachment 2: HOM_PZTV.pdf
HOM_PZTV.pdf
Attachment 3: HOM_plot_PZT0_0.pdf
HOM_plot_PZT0_0.pdf
Attachment 4: Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf
Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf
  317   Sat Feb 2 20:28:21 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationSummary: OMC(003) HOM structure recalculation

OMC (003)
History:
Measurement date 2014/7/5, Stored for I1, Installed to H1 2016/8 upon damage on 002

Attachment 1: OMC_HOM_140705.pdf
OMC_HOM_140705.pdf
Attachment 2: HOM_PZTV_PZT1_0V.pdf
HOM_PZTV_PZT1_0V.pdf
Attachment 3: HOM_plot_PZT0_0.pdf
HOM_plot_PZT0_0.pdf
Attachment 4: Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf
Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT_HOM.pdf
  318   Sat Feb 2 20:35:02 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterization Summary: OMC(002) HOM structure recalculation (after mirror replacement)

OMC (002) after repair
History:
Mirror replacement after the damage at H1. Measurement date 2019/1/10

Attachment 1: OMC_HOM_190110.pdf
OMC_HOM_190110.pdf
Attachment 2: HOM_PZTV.pdf
HOM_PZTV.pdf
Attachment 3: HOM_plot_PZT0_0.pdf
HOM_plot_PZT0_0.pdf
Attachment 4: Cav_scan_response_PZT.pdf
Cav_scan_response_PZT.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT.pdf Cav_scan_response_PZT.pdf
  322   Fri Apr 5 01:07:18 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationOMC(002): transmitted beam images

There was a concern that the transmission from CM1 has additional fringes. The shape of the transmitted beams from CM1, CM2, and FM2 (main) werecaptured with WinCamD.
Indeed CM1 and CM2 have the fringes, but it does not exist in the main transmission. So it seems that the fringes are associated with the curved mirrors. But how???

Attachment 1: CM1trasns.png
CM1trasns.png
Attachment 2: CM2trasns.png
CM2trasns.png
Attachment 3: FM2trans2.png
FM2trans2.png
  323   Fri Apr 5 01:08:17 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationOMC(002): DCPD / QPD alignment

The beam height in the cavity became totally different from the previous one and the shims needed to be much thicker than before. This is probably because of the alignment of the newly-glue curved mirror.

As the beam height is 2~2.5mm higher, two shims need to be stacked. The preliminary check of the heights using the alignment disks (dummy PDs) suggested the following combinations.

QPD1(SHORT)  D1201467-03 (SN 007) + D1201467-03 (SN 008) (2.0 mm + 2.0 mm = 4 mm)
QPD2(LONG)   D1201467-01 (SN 001) + D1201467-01 (SN 002) (1.5 mm + 1.5 mm = 3 mm)
DCPD1(TRANS) D1201467-02 (SN 006) + D1201467-03 (SN 005) (1.75mm + 2.0 mm = 3.75 mm)
DCPD2(REFL)  D1201467-02 (SN 002) + D1201467-03 (SN 006) (1.75mm + 2.0 mm = 3.75 mm)

This resulted that the fixing button head socket screws for the PD housings to be replaced from 5/16" to 7/16". Stephen kept CLASS A spare screws from Jeff's time.

For the DCPD alignment, a cap-removed Excelitas 3mm InGaAs PD is used. -> This needs to be returned to the PD stock next time.

- DCPD1 was aligned using the zoomed CCD image (Attachment 1). Once the beam is aligned, the angle was tweaked to have the reflection nicely dumped by the glass beam dump (Attachment 2).

- DCPD2 was aligned too. (Attachment 2/3)

- The two housings were fastened by a torque wrench at 2 inch lb.

Next step:

Continue with the QPDs. The QPD amp was already set.

Notes:
The cable of the CCD monitor has a problem -> need to check what's wrong
The servo box probably have large offset at the output stage or somewhere (but not input stages).

Attachment 1: IMG_7521.JPG
IMG_7521.JPG
Attachment 2: IMG_7529.JPG
IMG_7529.JPG
Attachment 3: IMG_7539.JPG
IMG_7539.JPG
Attachment 4: IMG_7541.JPG
IMG_7541.JPG
  324   Fri Apr 5 20:50:54 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationOMC(002): QPD alignment

QPD#              QPD1       QPD2
Housing#          #004       #008
Diode#            #44        #46
Shim              (see OMC ELOG 323)

-------------------------------------
Power Incident    252.3 uW  266.0 uW
Sum Out           174.2 mV  176.0 mV   +0.3
Vertical Out      + 4.7 mV  +19.0 mV   +0.2
Horizontal Out    -16.1 mV  - 8.0 mV   +0.0
SEG1              -52.4 mV  -53.  mV   -0.1
SEG2              -37.6 mV  -47.  mV   -0.1
SEG3              -41.8 mV  -34.  mV   -0.1
SEG4              -43.7 mV  -36.  mV   -0.1

-------------------------------------
Spot position X   +39   um  +15. um  (positive = more power on SEG1 and SEG4)
Spot position Y   - 8.1 um  -56. um  (positive = more power on SEG3 and SEG4)
-------------------------------------

Responsivity[A/W] 0.69      0.66
Q.E.              0.80      0.77
-------------------------------------

Arrangement of the segments
View from the beam
/ 2 | 1 X
|---+---|
\ 3 | 4 /


---------------

I(w,x,y) = Exp[-2 (x^2 + y^2)/w^2]/(Pi w^2/2)

(SEG_A+SEG_B-SEG_C-SEG_D)/(SEG_A+SEG_B+SEG_C+SEG_D) = Erf[sqrt(2) d/w]

d: distance of the spot from the center
w: beam width

Attachment 1: P_20190405_215906.jpg
P_20190405_215906.jpg
Attachment 2: P_20190405_215927.jpg
P_20190405_215927.jpg
  336   Mon Apr 15 21:11:49 2019 PhilipOpticsCharacterizationOMC(004): PZT testing for spare OMC

[Koji, Philip]

Today we tested the functionality of the four remaining PZTs (11,12,13 and 22) .  Each PZT was placed within a collimated 500um beam.
Roughly half of the beam was blocked by the PZT. The PZT and a PD then acted as shadow sensor. Each PZT was tested with 0 and
150 V. The resulting power change then could be converted into a displacement of the PZT using the beam diameter.

The open light value for each of these tests was 3.25 V.

PZT 11:
0 V supply voltage     --> 1.717 V on PD
150 V supply voltage --> 1.709 V on PD
delta = 0.008 V

PZT 12:
0 V supply voltage     --> 1.716 V on PD
150 V supply voltage --> 1.709 V on PD
delta = 0.007 V

PZT 13:
0 V supply voltage     --> 1.702 V on PD
150 V supply voltage --> 1.694 V on PD
delta = 0.008 V

PZT 22:
0 V supply voltage     --> 1.770 V on PD
150 V supply voltage --> 1.762 V on PD
delta = 0.008 V

0.008 V --> 0.24% change in power on PD --> about  3.8 um displacement assuming no light which is blocked
by the PZT is hitting the PD.

 

We further started to drive all four PZTs over night with 100 V (half of their range) at 100 Hz.
We additionally display the impedance to ensure none of them degrades.

All four PZTs seem to be connected to Teflon coated wires. It needs to be checked if these
fulfill the vacuum compatibility requirements.

  337   Tue Apr 16 11:36:36 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationOMC(004): PZT testing for spare OMC

Attachment 1: Shadow sensor setup for the PZT displacement test

Attachment 2: PZT endurance test. 4 PZTs were shaken at once.

Attachment 3~5: Function generator setup 100Hz, 3.5Vpp 1.75Voffset (meant be displayed for 50Ohm load)

Attachment 6: The above setting yields 7Vpp unipolar signal @Hi-Z load

Attachment 7: The output was monitored with a 1/10 probe with the PZTs connected. This shows 10Vmax 0Vin -> Good. This photo was taken at 17:35.

Attachment 8: The test is going well @9:15 next day. (t=15.7hours = 5.6Mcycles)

Attachment 9: The test went well. The modulation was stopped @15:35. (t=21hours = 7.6Mcycles)

Attachment 1: IMG_7620.jpg
IMG_7620.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_7623.jpg
IMG_7623.jpg
Attachment 3: IMG_7629.jpg
IMG_7629.jpg
Attachment 4: IMG_7630.jpg
IMG_7630.jpg
Attachment 5: IMG_7631.jpg
IMG_7631.jpg
Attachment 6: IMG_7632.jpg
IMG_7632.jpg
Attachment 7: IMG_7633.jpg
IMG_7633.jpg
Attachment 8: P_20190416_091537.jpg
P_20190416_091537.jpg
Attachment 9: IMG_7634.JPG
IMG_7634.JPG
  338   Tue Apr 16 16:35:09 2019 KojiOpticsConfigurationOMC(004): Glass breadboard selection

D1200105 SN006 was selected as the breadboard for OMC(004).
The reason is the best parallelism among the 
unused ones.

The attached is the excerpt from T1500060 with the #006 highlighted.

Attachment 1: BB_selection.pdf
BB_selection.pdf
  340   Tue Apr 16 16:52:36 2019 KojiOpticsConfigurationOMC(004): B Mirror selection

We are going to use B6 for the DCPD BS (BS2), and B1 for the QPD BS (BS3). Their role can not be swapped.

B6 has the best loss among the available ones, while the perpendicularity is not so critical due to the short arm.

B1 has the OK perpendicularity, while the loss is also moderately good.

The attachment is the excerpt from T1500060 with some highlighting.

Attachment 1: B_Mirror_selection.pdf
B_Mirror_selection.pdf
  341   Tue Apr 16 17:24:56 2019 KojiOpticsConfigurationOMC(004): E Mirror selection

We are going to use E6, E9, E11, and E14 for BS1, SM1, SM2, and SM3. They (and E18) are all very similar.

The attachment is the excerpt from T1500060 with some highlighting

Attachment 1: E_Mirror_selection.pdf
E_Mirror_selection.pdf
  342   Tue Apr 16 21:16:11 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationOMC(004): PZT testing for spare OMC

After having dug into the past email, it turned out that these wires were the ones already replaced from the original teflonwires. The length of them were confirmed to be ~19" (480mm). 

Quote:

All four PZTs seem to be connected to Teflon coated wires. It needs to be checked if these
fulfill the vacuum compatibility requirements.

 

  345   Wed Apr 17 10:30:37 2019 PhilipOpticsGeneralOMC optical set-up day 1

[Joe, Koji, Liyuan, Philip, Stephen]
Work done on 16.04.2019

Finishing assembly of transport box
Assembly worked fine except for the clamping structure to clamp the lid of the transport box to the bottom part.
It seemed that some of the plastic of these clamps became brittle during the baking. The plastic was removed and the
clamps where wiped clean. It appears that the clamps can't be locked as they should. Still the transport box should be fine
as the long screws will mainly clamp the two parts together.

Preparing the transport box to mount the breadboard
The lid of the the transport box was placed upside down and clamped to the table. All peak clamping structures where pulled back as far as possible.

Preparation and cleaning of the breadboard
We unpacked the breadboard and found lots of dust particles on it (most likely from the soft paper cover which was used). We used the ionized nitrogen gun
at 25 psi to get rid of the majority of particles and cross-checked with a bright green flash light before and after blowing. The second stage of cleaning was done
below the clean room tent and included the wiping of all surfaces. The breadboard was then placed into the prepared lid of the transport box and clamped with peak
screws.

Unpacking of the template
The previously cleaned template was unpacked while the last layer of coverage was removed below the cleanroom tent.

Template adjustment on the breadboard
All peak screws of the clamping structure of the template where removed. The template was placed onto the breadboard only seperated by peak spacers.
All peak screws have been inserted for horizontal clapming. A calipper was used to measure the distance of each edge of the template to the edge of the
breadboard. For documentation the labeled side of the bradboard (facing away from the persons on the pictures) of the upside down breadboard is defined to 
be the south side, continuing clockwise with west, north and east. First rough alignment was done by shifting the template on the breadboard and then the 
peak screws where used for fine tuning. The caliper values measured where:
North   C 8.32mm     E 8.52 mm     W 8.41 mm
East     C 8.08 mm
South   C 8.32 mm
West    C 8.02 mm
(E indicating east side position, W indicating west side position and C indicating center position)

  346   Thu Apr 18 20:47:54 2019 JoeOptics OMC initial alignment and locking

[Joe, Phillip, Koji, Stephen]

*draft post, please add anymore info if I missed something*

  • made initial alignment of the cavity. To do this we used the periscope mirrors to aim the incoming beam at the centre of the first mirror and second (1st curved mirror) mirror. Using the micrometers (initial positions was 0.20mm), we moved the first curved mirror so that it hit the third mirror. We then used a combination of the periscope and first curved mirror movements to start seeing 2 or 3 round trips. micrometer was set to roughly 0.11mm. We then only used  periscope mirrors to align the beam into the cavity.
  • We set up a wincam at the transmission of the cavity. This was a useful was of seeing what mode was being transmitted through the cavity. We walked the beam with the periscope mirrors until we saw flashes of the TM00 mode.
  • Once the cavity was transmitting TM00 modes, we started to lock it. Once it was locked we looked at the the spot positions of beam on the mirrors. Phillip looked with an IR viewer and could see that the spots were too high on both the curved mirrors
  • We set up a CCD to capture an image of this. Two post holders have been left in place for easy movement of the CCD.

General notes about working with this set up. The lens on the CCD can come off quite easily, as you just change how much its screwed on to change the focus. Care should be taken that you don't know the template with this as well, as the camera is quite close to the template (and near the edge of the bench!). Also be mindful of the PZT wires, as they can pull the mirrors out of position.

Attachment 1 shows the position of the spots on the mirrors A14 and PZT11. The spots are about 3mm ish from the centre of the curved mirror in the vertical and horizontal direction. 

Attachment 2 sketch of mirror positions.

Attachment 3 shows the postion of the spot on PZT13. The spot is less near the edge than on PZT11, but its still 2mm ish from the centre of the curved mirror in both directions.

To move the beam horizontally we can use the alignment matrix in appendix C of T1500060. However since we don't have control over the pitch of the mirrors, moving the spots down could require us to inspect the glass breadboard/prisms for dust. We suspect that PZT could be the culprit, as we could not see newtonian rings between its base and the glass breadboard. One way to test this idea is just to clean the bottom of the PZT with acetone, and see if that improves the spot position. If we don't have to do any work to realign it, then this was not the issue.

Koji pointed out that the spot in attachment 1 is very near the edge of the optic, so shifting the beam horizontally could also fix the vertical issue. 

Attachment 1: IMG_7676.JPG
IMG_7676.JPG
Attachment 2: IMG_7666.JPG
IMG_7666.JPG
Attachment 3: IMG_7670.JPG
IMG_7670.JPG
Attachment 4: IMG_7883.JPG
IMG_7883.JPG
Attachment 5: IMG_7882.JPG
IMG_7882.JPG
  347   Fri Apr 19 09:21:07 2019 PhilipOptics Cleaning of OMC optics

ach[Joe, Phillip, Koji, Stephen]

Work from 17.04.2019

First contact cleaning of OMC optics
We cleaned the OMC optic with first contact. After a first cleaning run all mirrors except for two looked
fine. One had some first contact residuals on the left at center height and another had some particle sitting
near the center area. As the ionized nitrogen gun didn't help we applied another round of first contact which resolved
the two issues. Unfortutanely the second run of cleaning again left some residuals of first contact at the edges.
We were able to peal these off with tweezers.

Placement of Optics at the breadboard
We cleaned the contact surfaces for the bonds using optic wipes and pure isopropanol. The placement wen't well for 3 of the 5 optics (low number of newtonian rings).
One was recleaned and placed on the breadboard again which seemed fine. For the 5th no newtonian rings could be seen (either verry ood or bad) we planed on trying it in the current set-up. Mirrors used can be seen in attachment 3.

 

Attachment 1: IMG_7877.JPG
IMG_7877.JPG
Attachment 2: IMG_7883.JPG
IMG_7883.JPG
Attachment 3: IMG_7884.JPG
IMG_7884.JPG
  349   Fri Apr 19 11:34:19 2019 KojiOptics OMC initial alignment and locking

The spot on CM1 was found displaced by 3.4mm (horiz.) and 3.0mm (vert.) in the upper right direction looking from the face side.
The spot on CM2 was found displaced by 1.2mm (horiz.) and 1.8mm (vert.) in the upper left direction looking from the face side.

The drawing on the left side of the attachment shows the estimated misalignment when we think they all come from the curved mirrors.
As for the yaw misalignment, CM1 and CM2 were 3.9mrad and 5.6mrad rotated (misaligned) in CW, respectively.
As for the pitch misalignment, CM1 and CM2 has 1.7mrad (narrowing) and 3.5mrad (widening), respectively. We have no adjustment for this.
Let's say if this comes from the dusts on the bottom of the prisms, CM1 has ~17um one, and CM2 has ~35um one beneath them. The question is if we can believe this or not? This should be checked with the Newton fringes we can see at the bottom of the prisms.

Attachment 1: misalignment1.pdf
misalignment1.pdf
  350   Sat Apr 20 00:50:12 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationOMC(004): Spot positions

Similarly to OMC ELOG 349 the spot positions after the replacement of CM2 were measured (Attachment 1)
Also, the spot positions after the realignment were measured. (Attachment 2)

Attachment 1: misalignment2.pdf
misalignment2.pdf
Attachment 2: misalignment3.pdf
misalignment3.pdf
  353   Tue Apr 23 10:21:12 2019 JoeOpticsConfigurationMoving the spots to the centre of the curved mirrors

[Koji,Philip, Liyuan, Joe]

CM1:

We moved the curved mirrors to these positions:

inner = 0.807mm

outer = 0.983 mm

CM2:

inner = 0.92 mm

outer = 0.85 mm

To do this so that realignment was easier, we moved the screws in steps of 5um. We alternated which mirror we adjusted so that we could monitor with a wincam how well aligned the beam into the cavity was. We only moved the cavity mirrors a small amount so we could still see higher order mode flashes transmitted through the cavity (e.g.TM03 modes). We would then improve the input alignment, and then move the cavity mirrors some more. Once the mirrors were adjusted according to http://nodus.ligo.caltech.edu:8080/OMC_Lab/190422_195450/misalignment4.pdf the spot positions looked near the middle of the curved mirrors (using a beam card). We began beam walking but we ran  out of range of the bottom periscope screws in the yaw dof. We tried using the third screw to move the mirrror in both yaw and pitch, hopefully this will let move the mirror such that we can use the just the yaw screw. This screw also ran out of range, so we decided that the cavity needed a small adjustment.

The curved mirrors were moved slightly (>5um) and then we tried to get alignment. By using the fibre coupler translation stage, we move the beam side ways slightly, and then tried to get the periscope mirrors back to a position where the screws could move the mirrors. Once we had an ok alignment, we checked the beam. It looked like it was pretty close to the centre of the curved mirrors, which is where we wanted it to be.

We then tried locking the cavity, although the error signal was quite small. The adjusted the input offset and gain of the servo (there is apparently some problem to do with the input and output offsets). Once the cavity was locked we could make the final adjustments to aligning. We still ran out of range on the periscope. We decided to move the breadboard with the fibre coupler and mode matching lenses on it. Because we knew that the cavity was aligned such that the beam hits the centres of the curved mirrors, we could regain flashes quite quickly. We saw the error signal go down, but eventually this decrease was just to do with the beam clipping on the periscope mirrors. We moved the spot back to where we ok aligned, and slid the periscope so we were not clipping the mirror. This worked very well, and then optimised the alignment.

We then tried to improve the mode matching. 

We took photos of the spot positions (quite near the center) and made the detuned locking measurement. The fitting of the data (attachment 1) wsa 1.1318m (what error should we put here?).

I think the order we did things in was:

  • turning anti clockwise on the fibre coupler and misalign the diode, we measured the modespacing.
  • returned the alignment for the photodiode, and realign fibre couple.
  • miss align the photodiode horizontally, and then used fibre coupler to maximise the peak higher order mode peak height. We then used the PD again to make the peak height bigger.
  •  
Attachment 1: FSR_detuned_locking.pdf
FSR_detuned_locking.pdf
Attachment 2: CM1_IMG_7702.JPG
CM1_IMG_7702.JPG
Attachment 3: CM2_IMG_7704.JPG
CM2_IMG_7704.JPG
  354   Wed Apr 24 13:58:51 2019 JoeOpticsCharacterizationOMC power budget and UV Epoxy Bonding of BS1

[koji,philip,joe,liyuan,stephen]

need to add spot positions.

Mirrors: PZT11,PZT22, A14, A5

Measurement postion Power P_normalise
P_in 15.66+-0.01mV 3.251+-0.001
V_ref,lock 64+-2mV 3.22+-0.001
V_ref,unlock 2.808+-0.001 V 3.253+-0.001
P_qpd 99.5+-0.5 uW 3.24+-0.002
P_cm1 79.0+-0.5 uW 3.22+-0.002
P_cm2 76.2+-0.03 uW 3.22+-0.01
P_trans 14.55+-0.05 mW 3.22+-0.01
Vref,dark -6.286 mV +-0.01mV  

Mode matching = 97.72%

15.66-> 15.30mW coupled.

~100uW for QPD

->15.2mW in cavity

Trans = 14.55mW -> 95.7% transmission

The flat mirrors were the ones with the most scattering, so we thought about how to improve it. We tried to move the first flat mirror by pushing it with our finger so that he beam would move along the optic. We tried this a couple of times, however the second time we moved it we lost our alignment and could not retrieve it. We looked at the mirror and we could see quite a lot of newtonian rings. We could see a small fibre on the glass bread board. We cleaned the optics base and the gbb, and we could get the alignment back. The beam was aligned to the cavity, the spots no longer hit the centre of the CM2. 

We measured the power budget again.

Measurement position Power P_normalise
V_ref,lock 47mV 3.24V
P_trans 14.45+-0.005mW 3.24 +-0.003 V
V_ref,unlock 2.68+-0.001 V 3.25+-.003
     

mode matching = 1-47/2680 = 0.9824, 98.2% mode matching

same p_normalise so

15.66-> 15.34mW coupled.

~15.24mW in cavity

transmission = 14.45, so 94.8% transmission.

Koji noticed that FM1 wasn't touching the template correctly, so he re-aligned the cavity.

Afternoon session - UV Bonding (E1300201-v1 procedure 6.4.4 "Gluing" using procedure in section 7.2 "UV Gluing")

Wiped down UV PPE, UV Illuminator, and UV Power Meter

Applied Optocast 3553-LV Epoxy to sample fused silica optics, to test quantity of glue needed and to become familiar with the process and tools. Philip and Joe each created a successful bond. Joe's had 3 visible spots in the bulk of the bond. Acetone was used to scrub some residue of epoxy from the surface near the OD, which was likely cured. Short duration exposure (seconds) to acetone at the perimeter of the bond did not yield any weakening of bond.

While test pieces were bonded, Koji was making some adjustments to the cavity alignment in preparation for gluing of the steering mirror BS1.

Koji noticed that the spring clamp was causing pitch in the BS1 mirror, so he recommended that we utilize the "restrain by allen key" technique to load the mirror during curing.

Once aligned, we tried taking the BS1 mirror out of the template and then putting it back. We did this twice and both times the cavity needed realigning (with the curved mirrors as well as the input steering periscope). Why is this? Since the mirror was touching the template it should not have become misaligned right? Maybe the template moves slightly? I think before glueing in the cavity mirrors we should find out why probably? Koji took a look and claimed that a few optics may have been unconstrained. 

Planning between Koji and Joe led to placement of 5 drops of epoxy on the BS1 surface, to match the bonding area. At this point we noticed that the template was not secured very well, by poking down on it we could see it move. This might explain why we are becoming misaligned very easily. Once the prism was back on the board, Koji used allen keys to move around the prism. This was done until we could align it again (i.t looked too pitched). The beam was aligned back into the cavity, and the UV light was used to cure the bond. The reflected DC when locked was

  • pre-cured = 47mV
  • cured = 55 mV

so it looks ok still.

 

 

 

  355   Thu Apr 25 15:05:19 2019 JoeOpticsCharacterizationLooking at PZT HOM spacing dependance and thinking about workflow

[koji, joe]

The template or glass breadboard was wobbling, and we noticed that the caivty alignment became worse/better when it was pressed down. We saw that it was the glass breadboard, so it was fixed into the transport fixture more securely. Now its alignement didn't change when it was pressed down. We took a pzt mirror out and replaced it, the alignment din't change much so that was good. We set up posts to hold the pzt wires.

We noticed that the bottom of the mirrors were dirty, so we cleaned them, and once we were happy with the newton rings, we aligned the cavity

Took a photo of CM2, the spot is maybe 1 beam diameter vertically and horizontally from the centre, and quite a bright spot could be seen. The same problem with CM1. We thought it would be good to see a measurement of higher order mode spacing dependence on PZT DC voltage rather than doing the full characterisation since the alignment seems to change quite a lot when ever we do anything, and this cavity arrangement probably isn't very good anyway (can see scattering on both curved mirrors with the IR camera). 

did measurements of FSR, = 2.64835MHz

did HOM spacing for 0,75,150V on CM1 in pitch and yaw.

we want to come up with a work flow for how to do these measurements, and make automate parts of the analysis?

 

  356   Wed May 1 15:40:46 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationOMC(004): Spot positions and the scattering

Tried a few things.

1. Replaced CM1 (PZT ASSY #10=M21+PZT#22+C12) with PZT ASSY #7 (=M1+PZT#13+C13)

We tried PZT ASSY #7 at the beginning and had the spots at almost at the top edge of the curved mirrors. As we found a particle on the bottom of the M1 prism (and removed it), I gave it a try again. Resulting spots are again very high. This results in rejecting PZT ASSY #7 and we set the combination of the PZT ASSYs as #8 (M7+P11+C11) and #10 (M21+P22+C12). This combination nominally gives the spot ~1mm above the center of the curved mirrors.

2. Swapped FM1 and FM2. Now FM1=A5 and FM2=A14.

No significant change of the scattering features on the FMs. The transmitted power was 14.85mW (Ref PD Vin = 3.42V), Reflection PD Vrefl,lock = 54.3mV and Vrefl,unlock = 2.89V (Vin=3.45V), Vrefl,offset = -6.39mV. The incident power was 17.43mW (Vin 3.69V).

==> Coupling 0.979 , OMC transmission 0.939 (This includes 0.6% loss to the QPD path) ...Not so great number

3. Built better camera setups to check the spot position and the scattering from the cavity mirrors.

Now the spot heights are fixed and safe to move the camera up for inches to obtain better views of the mirror faces. The camera was set 15" away from the mirrors with 1.5" height from the beam elevation. This is 0.1rad (~ 5 deg) and Cos(0.1)~0.995 so the distortion (compression) of the view is negligible. (Attachment) The spot photo were taken with the fixed CCD gain, the focus on the glass, and  lens aperture F=8.0. Later the focus and aperture were adjusted to have clear view of the scattring points.

The intensity of each scattering was constant at different views. I suppose this is because the scattering is coming from a spot smaller than the wavelength. The bright spots does not show any visible feature on the mirror surfaces when they were inspected with a green flash light.

CM2 has the excellent darkness and we want to keep this spot position. FM1, FM2, and CM1 showed bright scattering.

The spot at CM1 is not well centered on the mirror. And this is the way to avoid this scattering point. So let's think about to move the spot on CM1 by 1.3mm towards the center while the spot on the CM2 is fixed. Note that this is going to be done by the micrometers for CM1 and CM2.

By turning right micrometer of CM1 forward (50um = 5div = 1/10 turn) and the left micrometer of CM2 backward (60um = 6div) moves the spots on FM1, FM2, CM1, and CM2 by (0.43, 0.87, 1.3, 0)mm. This basically moves the spots toward the center of each mirror. Let's give it a try.

 

Attachment 1: misalignment.pdf
misalignment.pdf misalignment.pdf
  357   Fri May 3 11:06:28 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationOMC(004): Spot positions and the scattering

Experiment on 5/1
- CM1 right knob was moved 1div (10um) backward such that the spots were better centered on the mirrors 

FM1 (A5): h=-0.2mm -> 0.4mm made the spot much darker but still it has a few scattering spots.
FM2 (A14): h=-0.8mm -> 0.2mm reduced the number of spots from 2 to 1. And it is darker. The remaining spot at the center.
CM1 (C11): h=-1.3mm -> +1.0mm made the spot much darker.
CM2 (C12): h=-0.7mm -> +0.2mm remains dark.

Note: CM1 h=1mm and CM2 h~0mm are good locations. h+ is the good direction to move. Avoid h-.
FM1 and FM2 has the scat spots at the center. Want to go h+ more.

Uniformly go h+ is the good move. => This can be done by rotate CM1 positive => CM1 right knob CCW.

2019/5/1 CM1 right micrometer 1div backward
         
    Unit   V_RefPD [V]
P_TRANS 13.53 [mW]   3.09
V_REFL_LOCKED 53.4 [mV]   3.09
V_REFL_UNLOCK 2.52 [V]   3.065
P_IN 14.45 [mW]   3.07
V_REFL_OFFSET -6.35 [mV]    
         
Coupling 0.977      
OMC_Trans 0.953      

Improvement of the transmission from 93.9%->95.3%


- Further moved CM1 right knob 0.5div (0.5um) backward such that the spots were moved to h+ directions.
FM1 (A5): h=0.4mm -> 1.1mm (there is only one spot rather than multiple spots)
FM2 (A14): h=0.2mm -> 1.1mm (darker but multiple spots)
CM1 (C11): h=1.0mm -> 1.8mm (brighter but single spot)
CM2 (C12): h=0.2mm -> 1.5mm (dark multiple spots)

2019/5/1 CM1 right micrometer 0.5div backward
         
    Unit   V_RefPD [V]
P_TRANS 14.55 [mW]   3.28
V_REFL_LOCKED 49 [mV]   3.28
V_REFL_UNLOCK 2.755 [V]   3.299
P_IN 15.64 [mW]   3.3
V_REFL_OFFSET -6.316 [mV]    
         
Coupling 0.980      
OMC_Trans 0.955      

Not much improvement of the transmission but kept 95% level.

- Replaced FM1 (A5) with A1 mirror (No photo)

Good news: This did not change the cavity alignment at all.

Transmission 95.4%

- Tweaked the CM1 angle

Transmission 95.3%

=> A1 mirror does not improve the transmission much.


Next Plan: Use A5 (or something else) as FM2 and see if A14 caused the dominant loss.

Attachment 1: misalignment.pdf
misalignment.pdf misalignment.pdf misalignment.pdf
  359   Thu May 9 17:35:07 2019 KojiOpticsGeneralAlignment strategy

Notes on the OMC cavity alignment strategy

- x3=1.17 γ + 1.40 δ, x4=1.40 γ + 1.17 δ
- This means that the effect of the two curved mirrors (i.e. gouy phases) are very similar. To move x3 and x4 in common is easy, but to do differentially is not simple.
- 1div of a micrometer is 10um. This corresponds to the angular motion of 0.5mrad (10e-6/20e-3 = 5e-4). ~0.5mm spot motion.
- ~10um displacement of the mirror longitudinal position has infinitesimal effect on the FSR. Just use either micrometer (-x side).
- 1div of micrometer motion is just barely small enough to keep the cavity flashing. => Easier alignment recovery. Larger step causes longer time for the alignment recovery due to the loss of the flashes.

- After micrometer action, the first move should be done by the bottom mirror of the periscope. And this is the correct direction for beam walking.

- If x3 should be moved more than x4, use CM2, and vise versa.
- If you want to move x3 to +x and keep x4 at a certain place, 1) Move CM2 in (+). This moves x3 and x4 but x3>x4. 2) Compensate x4 by turning CM1 in (-). This returnes x4 to the original position (approximately), but leave x3 still moved. Remember the increment is <1div of a micrometer and everytime the cavity alignment is lost, recover it before loosing the flashes.

Attachment 1: T1500060_OMC_Optical_Testing_Procedure.pdf
T1500060_OMC_Optical_Testing_Procedure.pdf
  360   Thu May 9 18:10:24 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationOMC(004): Spot position scan / power budget

(Now the CCD image is captured as a movie and the screen capture is easier!)

Various spot positions on CM1 and CM2 were tried to test how the transmission is dependent on the spot positions. CM1 has a few bright spots while CM2 shows very dark scattering most of the case. Attachment 1 is the example images of one of the best alignment that realized the transmission of ~96%. FM1 and FM2 also showed bright spots. The replacement of the FM mirrors does not improve nor degrade the transmission significantly. The transmission is still sensitive to the spot positions on the alignment. This indicates that the loss is likely to be limited by CM1.

Attachment 2 shows the distribution of the (known) scattering spots on CM1. The bright spots are distributed every ~1mm on the spot height and the beam (with beam radius of .5mmm) can't find a place where there is no prominent spots.

We will be able to examine if the transmission can be improved or not by replacing this CM1 mirror.

Attachment 1: 190508.png
190508.png
Attachment 2: scattering_spots_CM1.png
scattering_spots_CM1.png
  363   Mon May 20 19:53:17 2019 KojiOpticsConfigurationDCPD high power test

We want to perform a damage test of OMC DCPDs with high power beam. The OMC DCPD is the 3mm InGaAs photodiodes with high quantum efficiency, delivered by Laser Components.
The sites want to know the allowed input power during the OMC scan for beam mode analysis. The nominal bias voltage of the PDs is +12V. Therefore, 30mA of photocurrent with the transimpedance of 400 Ohm is already enough to saturate the circuit. This means that the test is intended to check the damage of the photodiode mainly by the optical power.

The test procedure is as follows:

1. Illuminate the diode with certain optical power.
2. Measure the dark current and dark noise of the PD with no light on it.
3. Check the condition of the PD surface with a digital camera.
4. Repeat 1~3 with larger optical power.

The beam from an NPRO laser is delivered to the photodiode. The maximum power available is 300~400mW. The beam shape was regulated to have the beam radius of ~500um.

- When the PD is exposed to the high power beam, the circuit setup A) is used. This setup is intended to mimic the bias and transimpedance configuration used in the DCPD amp at the site.

- When the dark noise is measured, the circuit setup B) is used. This setup is low noise enough to measure the dark noise (and current) of the PD.

- The test procedure is going to be tested with an Excelitas 3mm InGaAs PD (C30665), and then tested with the high QE PD.

Attachment 1: BIAS.pdf
BIAS.pdf
Attachment 2: P_20190520_204822.jpg
P_20190520_204822.jpg
  364   Wed May 22 07:31:37 2019 KojiOpticsConfigurationCamera test (DCPD high power test)

C30665 (3mm) camera test. The camera was Canon PowerShot G7X MkII. Exposure 1/15s, F 5.6, ISO 125, MF (~the closest), no zoom.
This image was taken before the beam illumination. Will tune the green lighting to have some gradient on the surface so that we can see any deformation of the surface.

 

Attachment 1: 20190521201838_IMG_7939_2.jpg
20190521201838_IMG_7939_2.jpg
  365   Thu May 23 01:42:46 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationC30665 high power test

An Excelitas C30665 PD with the cap removed (SN07 in Case H slot #2) was exposed to the beam with the optical power of 1.4mW to 334mW.
After each illumination, the dark current and the dark noise level were tested. Also the photo image of the PD surface was taken each time.

- No significant change of the dark current after each illumination.

- No significant change of the dark noise after each illumination.

- No visible change of the surface observed.

 

Attachment 1: C30665_high_power_test.pdf
C30665_high_power_test.pdf
Attachment 2: pd_surface.jpg
pd_surface.jpg
  366   Thu May 23 23:27:38 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationIGHQEX3000 high power test

LaserComponents IGHQEX3000 (Cage B2: Serial# B1-23) was exposed to the beam with the optical power from 1.6mW to 332mW.
After each illumination, the dark current and the dark noise level were measured. Also the photo image of the PD surface was taken each time.

- No significant change of the dark current after each illumination.

- No significant change of the dark noise after each illumination.

- No visible change of the surface observed.

(During this dark noise measurement, the current amp gain was set to be 1e8 V/A, instead of 1e7 for the measurements yesterday.)

Attachment 1: HQEPD_high_power_test.pdf
HQEPD_high_power_test.pdf
Attachment 2: pd_images.png
pd_images.png
  367   Tue May 28 12:14:20 2019 StephenOpticsGeneralCM PZT Assembly Debonding of EP30-2 in Acetone

[LiyuanZ, StephenA]

Downs B119

Summary: Beginning on 20 May 2019, two CM PZT assemblies were soaked in Acetone in an effort to debond the EP30-2 bonds between tombstone-PZT and between PZT-optic. Debonding was straightforward after 8 days of soaking. 24 hours of additional acetone soaking will now be conducted in an attempt to remove remnant EP30-2 from bonding surfaces.

Procedure: The assemblies were allowed to soak in acetone for 8 days, with acetone level below the HR surface of the optic. No agitation of the solution, mechanical abrasion of the bond, or other disturbance was needed for the bond to soften.

GariLynn contributed the glassware and fume hood, and advised on the process (similar to debonding of CM and PZT from OMC SN002 after damaging event). The equipment list was (WIP, more detail / part numbers will be gathered today and tomorrow):

  • crystallizing dish (no spout, like a deep petri dish)
  • curved lid
  • wax sheet (to seal)
  • acetone
  • fume hood

Results: Today, 28 May 2019, I went to the lab to check on the optics after 8 days of soaking. Liyuan had monitored the acetone level during the first 4 days, topping up once on 24 May. All bonds were fully submerged for 8 days.

There were 2 assemblies soaked in one crystallizing dish. Debonded assemblies - ref OMC eLOG 328 for specified orientations and components:

PZT Assy #9 - ref. OMC eLOG 334 - M17+PZT#12+C10

PZT Assy #7 - ref. OMC eLOG 332 - M1+PZT#13+C13

PZT Assy #7 was investigated first.

  • C13 was removed with no force required.
  • PZT#13 was removed with no force required.
  • EP30-2 remained at the bond surfaces and tracing the diameters of each bond on each of the 3 bonding surfaces of the PZT and tombstone - these components were returned to the dish to soak.
  • No EP30-2 remained on the surface of the curved mirror - C13 was removed and stored.

A video of removal of C10 and PZT#12 from PZT Assy #9 was collected (See Attachment 8), showing the ease with which the debonded components could be separated.

  • C10 was removed with no force required.
  • A slight force - applied by gripping the barrel of the PZT and pushing with the index finger on the surface of the tombstone - was required to separate PZT#12 from M17,
    • likely due to excess glue at the barrel of the PZT
  • EP30-2 remained at the bond surfaces and tracing the diameters of each bond on each of the 3 bonding surfaces of the PZT and tombstone - these components were returned to the dish to soak.
  • No EP30-2 remained on the surface of the curved mirror - C13 was removed and stored.

Photos and video have been be added to supplement this report (edit 2019/07/08).

 

Attachment 1: omc367_IMG_3499_omc_removal_c13_from_CM7.JPG
omc367_IMG_3499_omc_removal_c13_from_CM7.JPG
Attachment 2: omc367_IMG_3500_omc_removal_pzt13_from_CM7.JPG
omc367_IMG_3500_omc_removal_pzt13_from_CM7.JPG
Attachment 3: omc367_IMG_3501_omc_removal_pzt13_from_CM7_thickness.JPG
omc367_IMG_3501_omc_removal_pzt13_from_CM7_thickness.JPG
Attachment 4: omc367_IMG_3505_omc_removal_M1_from_CM7.JPG
omc367_IMG_3505_omc_removal_M1_from_CM7.JPG
Attachment 5: omc367_IMG_3507_omc_removal_c10_from_CM9.JPG
omc367_IMG_3507_omc_removal_c10_from_CM9.JPG
Attachment 6: omc367_IMG_3512_omc_removal_pzt12_from_CM9.JPG
omc367_IMG_3512_omc_removal_pzt12_from_CM9.JPG
Attachment 7: omc367_IMG_3515_omc_removal_m17_from_CM9.JPG
omc367_IMG_3515_omc_removal_m17_from_CM9.JPG
Attachment 8: omc367_IMG_3506_omc_removal_of_c10_and_pzt12_from_CM9.MOV
  369   Mon Jul 1 12:38:49 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationA and M prisms perpendicularity measurement

[Stephen, Koji]

The perpendicularity of some of the A and M prisms were tested.

Results

- The measurement results are listed as Attachment 1 and 2 together with the comparisons to the measurement in 2013 and the spec provided from the vendor.
- Here, the positive number means that the front side of the prism has larger angle than 90deg for the air side. (i.e. positive number = facing up)
- The RoC of the curved mirrors is 2.5m. Therefore, roughly speaking, 83arcsec corresponds to ~1mm beam spot shift. The requirement is 30 arcsec.
- The A prisms tend to have positive and small angle deviations while the M prisms to have negative and large (~50arcsec) angle deviations.
- The consistency: The measurements in 2013 and 2019 have some descrepancy but not too big. This variation tells us the reliability of the measurements, say +/-30arcsec.

Setup

- The photos of the setup is shown as Attachments 3/4/5. Basically this follows the procedure described in Sec 2.2.2 of T1500060.
- The autocollimator (AC) is held with the V holders + posts.
- The periscope post for the turning Al mirror was brought from Downs by Stephen.
- The turning mirror is a 2" Al mirror. The alignment of the turning mirror was initially aligned using the retroreflection to the AC. Then the pitching of the holder was rotated by 22.5deg so that the AC beam goes down to the prism.
- The prism is held on a Al mirror using the post taken from a prism mount.
- If the maximum illumination (8V) is used, the greenish light becomes visible and the alignment becomes easier.
- There are two reflections 1) The beam which hits the prism first, and then the bottom mirror second, 2) The beam which hits the bottom mirror first and then the prism second. Each beam gains 2 theta compared to the perfect retroreflection case. Therefore the two beams have 4 theta of their relative angle difference. The AC is calibrated to detect 2 theta and tells you theta (1div = 1 arcmin = 60 arcsec). So just read the angle defferencein the AC and divide the number by 2 (not 4).

Attachment 1: A_prism.png
A_prism.png
Attachment 2: M_prism.png
M_prism.png
Attachment 3: P_20190627_222658.jpg
P_20190627_222658.jpg
Attachment 4: setup2.JPG
setup2.JPG
Attachment 5: M01_1_id.JPG
M01_1_id.JPG
Attachment 6: A14_meas.JPG
A14_meas.JPG
  370   Mon Jul 1 12:49:42 2019 KojiOpticsCharacterizationScattering measurement of A and C mirrors

Liyuan's scattering measurement for the A and C mirrors.

Attachment 1: omc_cm_tis_062419.pdf
omc_cm_tis_062419.pdf omc_cm_tis_062419.pdf
Attachment 2: omc_prism_tis_062419.pdf
omc_prism_tis_062419.pdf omc_prism_tis_062419.pdf omc_prism_tis_062419.pdf
  371   Thu Aug 22 12:35:53 2019 StephenOpticsCharacterizationWedging of the debonded PZTs 2019 August

Wedge and thickness measurements of PZTs 12 and 13 took place after debonding and cleaning - results are shown in the first image (handwritten post-it format).

These thickness measurements seem to have come back thinner than previous measurements. It is possible that I have removed some PZT material while mechanically removing glue. It is also possible that there is systematic error between the two sets of measurements. I did not run any calculations of wedge ange or orientation on these data.

Note that cleaning of debonded PZTs involved mechanically separating glue from the planar faces of PZTs. The second image shows the razer blade used to scrape the glue away.

There were thick rings of glue where there had been excess squeezed out of the bond region, and there was also a difficult-to-remove bond layer that was thinner. I observed the presence of the thin layer by its reflectivity. The thick glue came off in patches, while the thin glue came off with a bit of a powdery appearance. It was hard to be certain that all of the thin bond layer came off, but I made many passes on each of the faces of the 2 PZTs that had been in the bonded CM assemblies. I found it was easiest to remove the glue in the bonded

I was anticipating that the expected 75-90 micron bond layer would affect the micrometer thickness measurements if it was still present, but I did not notice any irregularities (and certainly not at the 10 micron level), indicating that the glue was removed successfully (at least to the ~1 micron level).

 

Quote:

Yesterday I measured the thickness of the PZTs in order to get an idea how much the PZTs are wedged.

For each PZT, the thickness at six points along the ring was measured with a micrometer gauge.
The orientation of the PZT was recognized by the wire direction and a black marking to indicate the polarity.

A least square fitting of these six points determines the most likely PZT plane.
Note that the measured numbers are assumed to be the thickness at the inner rim of the ring
as the micrometer can only measure the maximum thickness of a region and the inner rim has the largest effect on the wedge angle.
The inner diameter of the ring is 9mm.



The measurements show all PZTs have thickness variation of 3um maximum.

The estimated wedge angles are distributed from 8 to 26 arcsec. The directions of the wedges seem to be random
(i.e. not associated with the wires)



As wedging of 30 arcsec causes at most ~0.3mm spot shift of the cavity (easy to remember),
the wedging of the PZTs is not critical by itself. Also, this number can be reduced by choosing the PZT orientations
based on the estimated wedge directions --- as long as we can believe the measurements.



Next step is to locate the minima of each curved mirror. Do you have any idea how to measure them?

 

Attachment 1: IMG_4775.JPG
IMG_4775.JPG
Attachment 2: IMG_4770.JPG
IMG_4770.JPG
  372   Fri Aug 23 11:11:44 2019 shrutiOpticsCharacterizationFinding the curvature bottom

I attempted to fit the data taken by Koji of the beam spot precession at the CCD in order to find the location of the curvature bottom in terms of its distance (d) and angle (\phi) from the centre of the mirror. This was done using the method described in a previous similar measurement  and Section 2.1.3 of T1500060.

Initially, I attempted doing a circle_fit on python as seen in Attachment 1, and even though more points seem to coincide with the circle, Koji pointed out that the more appropriate way of doing it would be to fit the following function:

f(i, \theta, r, \phi) = \delta_{i,0} [r \cos(\theta+\phi) + x_c] + \delta_{i,1} [r \sin(\theta+\phi) +y_c]

since that would allow us to measure the angle \phi more accurately; \phi is the anti-clockwise measured angle that the curvature bottom makes with the positive x direction.

As seen on the face of the CCD, x is positive up and y is positive right, thus, plotting it as the reflection (ref. Attachment 2) would make sure that \phi is measured anti-clockwise from the positive x direction.

 

The distance from the curvature bottom is calculated as 

d = \frac{rR}{2L}

r: radius of precession on CCD screen (value obtained from fit parameters, uncertainty in this taken from the std dev provided by fit function)

R: radius of curvature of the mirror 

L: Distance between mirror and CCD

 

R = 2.575 \pm 0.005 m (taken from testing procedure doc referenced earlier) and L = 0.644 \pm 0.005 m (value taken from testing doc, uncertainty from Koji)

  d (mm) \phi (deg)
C7 0.554 \pm 0.004 -80.028 \pm 0.005
C10 0.257 \pm 0.002 -135.55 \pm 0.02
C13 0.161 \pm 0.001 -79.31 \pm 0.06

 

Attachment 1: CircleFit.pdf
CircleFit.pdf
Attachment 2: SineFit.pdf
SineFit.pdf
  373   Thu Aug 29 11:51:49 2019 shrutiOpticsCharacterizationWedging of the debonded PZTs - Calculation

Using the measurements of PZTs 12,13 taken by Stephen, I estimated the wedging angle and orientation following Section 2.3.1 of T1500060. The results can be found in Attachment1 and is summarised as follows.

For PZT 12, PZT 13 respectively:

Avg. height = 2.0063 mm, 2.0035 mm

Wedge direction (from the same direction as in the doc: positive right) = 120 deg, 120 deg

Wedge angles = 45.8 arcsec, 30.6 arcsec

 

This was done assuming that the measurements were taken uniformly at intervals of 60deg along the inner rim of the PZT. The diameter (2r) of the inner rim, according to T1500060, is 9mm. The measured heights were fitted with the function

h = h_0 + \tan(\Omega)\text{ }r(1-\cos(\theta - \alpha))

as depicted in Attachment2 to find wedging angle (\Omega) and orientation (\alpha).

Quote:

Wedge and thickness measurements of PZTs 12 and 13 took place after debonding and cleaning - results are shown in the first image (handwritten post-it format).

These thickness measurements seem to have come back thinner than previous measurements. It is possible that I have removed some PZT material while mechanically removing glue. It is also possible that there is systematic error between the two sets of measurements. I did not run any calculations of wedge ange or orientation on these data.

Note that cleaning of debonded PZTs involved mechanically separating glue from the planar faces of PZTs. The second image shows the razer blade used to scrape the glue away.

There were thick rings of glue where there had been excess squeezed out of the bond region, and there was also a difficult-to-remove bond layer that was thinner. I observed the presence of the thin layer by its reflectivity. The thick glue came off in patches, while the thin glue came off with a bit of a powdery appearance. It was hard to be certain that all of the thin bond layer came off, but I made many passes on each of the faces of the 2 PZTs that had been in the bonded CM assemblies. I found it was easiest to remove the glue in the bonded

I was anticipating that the expected 75-90 micron bond layer would affect the micrometer thickness measurements if it was still present, but I did not notice any irregularities (and certainly not at the 10 micron level), indicating that the glue was removed successfully (at least to the ~1 micron level).

 

Quote:

Yesterday I measured the thickness of the PZTs in order to get an idea how much the PZTs are wedged.

For each PZT, the thickness at six points along the ring was measured with a micrometer gauge.
The orientation of the PZT was recognized by the wire direction and a black marking to indicate the polarity.

A least square fitting of these six points determines the most likely PZT plane.
Note that the measured numbers are assumed to be the thickness at the inner rim of the ring
as the micrometer can only measure the maximum thickness of a region and the inner rim has the largest effect on the wedge angle.
The inner diameter of the ring is 9mm.



The measurements show all PZTs have thickness variation of 3um maximum.

The estimated wedge angles are distributed from 8 to 26 arcsec. The directions of the wedges seem to be random
(i.e. not associated with the wires)



As wedging of 30 arcsec causes at most ~0.3mm spot shift of the cavity (easy to remember),
the wedging of the PZTs is not critical by itself. Also, this number can be reduced by choosing the PZT orientations
based on the estimated wedge directions --- as long as we can believe the measurements.



Next step is to locate the minima of each curved mirror. Do you have any idea how to measure them?

 

 

Attachment 1: PZT_Wedging_Results.pdf
PZT_Wedging_Results.pdf
Attachment 2: PZT_Wedging_Calc.pdf
PZT_Wedging_Calc.pdf
  374   Thu Sep 5 15:40:42 2019 shrutiOpticsConfigurationPZT Sub-Assembly

Aim: To find the combinations of mounting prism+PZT+curved mirror to build two PZT sub-assemblies that best minimises the total vertical beam deviation.

(In short, attachment 1 shows the two chosen sets of components and the configuration according which they must be bonded to minimize the total vertical angular deviation.)

The specfic components and configuration were chosen as follows, closely following Section 2.3.3 of T1500060:

Available components:

Mounting prisms: 1,2,12,14,15 (Even though there is mention of M17 in the attachments, it can not be used because it was chipped earlier.)

PZTs: 12,13

Curved mirrors: 10,13

 

Method:

For a given choice of prism, PZT and mirror, the PZT can be placed either at 0deg or 180deg, and the mirror can rotated. This allows us to choose an optimal mirror rotation and PZT orientation which minimises the vertical deviation.

Total vertical angle = $\theta_{v, prism} +\theta_{v,wedge} +\theta_{v,mirror}$

\theta_{v, prism} was measured by Koji as described in elog 369.

\theta_{v, wedge} [\text{arcsec}] = \theta_{PZT} \sin{\frac{\pi \phi_{PZT}}{180}},             \theta_{PZT}, \phi_{PZT} are the wedge angle and orientation respectively and were measured earlier and shown in elog 373 . 

\theta_{v, mirror} [\text{arcsec}] = \frac{180 \times 3600 \times d}{\pi R_{RoC}} \times \sin{\frac{\pi (\phi-\phi_{ROT})}{180}},               The measurement of the location of the curvature bottom (d, \phi) of the mirrors is shown in elog 372 . The optimal \phi_{ROT} is to be found.

 

These steps were followed:

  1. For every combination of prism, PZT, and mirror, the total vertical deviation was minimized with respect to the angle of rotation of the curved mirror computationally (SciPy.optimize.minimize). The results of this computation can be found in Attachment 2: where Tables 1.1 and 2.1 show the minimum achievable deviations for mirrors C10 and C13 respectively, and Tables 1.2 and 2.2 show the corresponding angle of rotation of the mirrors \phi_{ROT} .
  2. From the combinations that show low total deviations (highlighted in red in Attachment 2), the tolerances for 5 arcsec and 10 arcsec deviations with mirror rotation were calculated, and is shown in Tables 1.3, 1.4, 2.3, 2.4 of Attachment 2.
  3. While calculating the tolerances, the dependence of the vertical deviations with rotation were also plotted (refer Attachment 3).
  4. Two sets from available components with low total deviation and high tolerance were chosen. 

 

Result:

These are the ones that were chosen:

  1. M14 + PZT13 at 0deg + C13 rotated by 169deg anticlockwise (tot vertical dev ~ -3 arcsec)
  2. M12 + PZT12 at 0deg + C10 rotated by 88deg clockwise (tot vertical dev ~0 arcsec)

The method of attaching them is depicted in Attachment 1.

 

Attachment 1: Diagrams_SubAssembly.pdf
Diagrams_SubAssembly.pdf Diagrams_SubAssembly.pdf
Attachment 2: C10_C13_Combinations.pdf
C10_C13_Combinations.pdf C10_C13_Combinations.pdf
Attachment 3: Plots_Config_Tolerance.pdf
Plots_Config_Tolerance.pdf
  378   Mon Sep 23 21:29:51 2019 KojiOpticsGeneralOMC(004): PZT sub-assembly gluing (#9/#10)

[Stephen, Shruti, Koji]

We worked on the gluing of the PZT sub-assy (#9 and #10) along with the designed arrangement by Shruti (OMC ELOG 374).

The detailed procedures are described in E1300201 Section 6.2 PZT subassembly and Section 7.3 EP30-2 gluing.

We found that the PZTs, which were debonded from the previous PZT sub assy with acetone, has some copper wires oxidized. However, we confirmed that this does not affect the conductivity of the wires, as expected.

The glue test piece cooked in the toaster oven showed excellent curing. GO SIGNAL

Stephen painted the PZT as shown in Attachment 1.

The fixtures were closed with the retaining plate and confirmed that the optics are not moving in the fixtures.


At this point, we checked the situation of the air-bake oven. And we realized that the oven controller was moved to another vacuum oven and in use with a different setting.

Stephen is going to retrieve the controller to the air bake oven and test the temp profile overnight. Once we confirm the setting is correct, the PZT sub assys will be heat cured in the oven.  Hopefully, this will happen tomorrow. Until then, the sub-assys are resting on the south flow bench in the cleanroom.

Attachment 1: IMG_8933.jpg
IMG_8933.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_8934.jpg
IMG_8934.jpg
  381   Mon Sep 30 23:16:53 2019 KojiOpticsGeneralOMC(004): PZT sub-assembly gluing (#9/#10)

Friday: [Stephen, Koji]

As the oven setting has qualified, we brought the PZT assys in the air bake oven.

Monday: [Stephen, Shruti, Koji]

We brought the PZT assys to the clean room. There was not bonding between the flexture and the PZT subassy (Good!). Also the bonding o at each side looks completely wetted and looks good. The package was brought to the OMC lab to be tested in the optical setup.

Attachment 1: IMG_8950.jpeg
IMG_8950.jpeg
Attachment 2: IMG_8953.jpeg
IMG_8953.jpeg
Attachment 3: IMG_8954.jpeg
IMG_8954.jpeg
Attachment 4: IMG_8955.jpeg
IMG_8955.jpeg
  386   Fri Dec 6 00:55:25 2019 KojiOpticsGeneralBeamdump gluing

[Stephen, Koji]

20 glass beamdumps were bonded at the 40m cleanroom.


Attachment 1: We had 20 fused silica disks with a V-groove and 40 black glass pieces
Attachment 2: The black glass pieces had (usual) foggy features. It is well known to be very stubborn. We had to use IPA/acetone and wiping with pressure. Most of the feature was removed, but we could still see some. We decided to use the better side for the inner V surfaces.
Attachment 3: EP30-2 expiration date was 1/22/2020 👍. 7.66g of EP30-2 was poured and 0.38g of glass sphere was added. Total glue weight was 8.04g
Attachment 4: Glue test piece was baked at 200F in a toaster oven for ~12min. It had no stickiness. It was totally crisp. 👍👍👍
Attachment 5: Painted glue on the V-groove and put the glass pieces in. Then gave a dub of blue at the top and bottom of the V from the outside. In the end, we mostly had the glue went through the V part due to capillary action.
Attachment 6: The 20 BDs were stored in stainless vats. We looked at them for a while to confirm there is no drift and opening of the V part. Because the air bake oven was not available at the time, we decided to leave the assys there for the room temp curing, and then later bake them for the completion of the curing.
 

Attachment 1: 20191205114336_IMG_9171_1.jpeg
20191205114336_IMG_9171_1.jpeg
Attachment 2: 20191205114538_IMG_9173_1.jpeg
20191205114538_IMG_9173_1.jpeg
Attachment 3: 20191205161458_IMG_9175_1.jpeg
20191205161458_IMG_9175_1.jpeg
Attachment 4: 20191205163305_IMG_9183_1.jpeg
20191205163305_IMG_9183_1.jpeg
Attachment 5: 20191205172409_IMG_9187_1.jpeg
20191205172409_IMG_9187_1.jpeg
Attachment 6: 20191205172432_IMG_9188_1.jpeg
20191205172432_IMG_9188_1.jpeg
ELOG V3.1.3-