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ID Date Author Type Category Subjectup
  433   Mon Apr 21 13:12:21 2008 robUpdateComputer Scripts / Programstdsread bugs

Quote:
There seems to be a problem with reading the C1:IOO-MASTER_OVERFLOW field
when it is read in as part of an array. The only way for me to describe it
is to just attach the terminal output in this entry...this is mainly for
Matt and Rob
.


I first noticed that the output of the MC-WFS sensing matrix was different than
the outputs from a year ago, namely that the excitation channel was not being
processed and outputted to the file. This made the output matrix diagonalization
scripts fail.

I noticed that there are several different copies of tdsread.cc sitting around.
Looks like they have been hacked in the last year but I am not sure if this
excitation channel readback is an intentional change; email has been sent to the
authors to find out -- they will probably post some kind of response in the log
to resolve what's up.


My guess is that the problem with the IOO channel is not related, but I'm not sure:
op440m:WFS>set ioo_head = "${ifo}:IOO-"
op440m:WFS>set sus_head = "${ifo}:SUS-"
op440m:WFS>set oflows = `tdsread ${sus_head}MC1_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${sus_head}MC2_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${sus_head}MC3
_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${ioo_head}MASTER_OVERFLOW`
ERROR: C1:IOO-MASTER_OVERFLOW value not read
op440m:WFS>set oflows = `tdsread ${sus_head}MC1_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${sus_head}MC2_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${ioo_head}MAS
TER_OVERFLOW`
ERROR: C1:IOO-MASTER_OVERFLOW value not read
op440m:WFS>set oflows = `tdsread ${ioo_head}MASTER_OVERFLOW`
op440m:WFS>set oflows = `tdsread ${sus_head}MC1_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${ioo_head}MASTER_OVERFLOW`
ERROR: C1:IOO-MASTER_OVERFLOW value not read
op440m:WFS>set oflows = `tdsread ${sus_head}MC1_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${ioo_head}MASTER_OVERFLOW ${sus_head}MC2_MASTER_OVERFLOW`
ERROR: C1:IOO-MASTER_OVERFLOW value not read
op440m:WFS>echo $oflows
0
op440m:WFS>set oflows = `tdsread ${ioo_head}MASTER_OVERFLOW`
op440m:WFS>echo $oflows
0
op440m:WFS>set oflows = `tdsread ${sus_head}MC1_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${sus_head}MC2_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${sus_head}MC3_MASTER_OVERFLOW`
op440m:WFS>echo $oflows
0 0 0
op440m:WFS>echo `tdsread ${sus_head}MC1_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${ioo_head}MASTER_OVERFLOW ${sus_head}MC2_MASTER_OVERFLOW`
ERROR: C1:IOO-MASTER_OVERFLOW value not read
0
op440m:WFS>echo "tdsread ${sus_head}MC1_MASTER_OVERFLOW ${ioo_head}MASTER_OVERFLOW ${sus_head}MC2_MASTER_OVERFLOW"
tdsread C1:SUS-MC1_MASTER_OVERFLOW C1:IOO-MASTER_OVERFLOW C1:SUS-MC2_MASTER_OVERFLOW
op440m:WFS>



This is the same bug described in entry 180. I believe it has nothing to do with tdsread, which did not change in the time period before the bug appeared, but perhaps has something to do with other EPICS libraries somewhere (tdsread relies on these epics libraries to do its dirty work). Here is entry 180 for reference:


Quote:
tdsread has developed a strange new illness, whereby it cannot read EPICS values from two subsystems at once (e.g., getting an LSC and SUS value simultaneously). I thought this might have something to with the fact that both losepics and iscepics are running on the same box,
but the same thing happens with IOO EPICS records, so that's not the culprit.

This is new behaviour, and it's only happening on the solaris machines. I suspect some ENV/cshrc juju has caused it, as the tdsread executable is the same one from April, and I don't think our EPICS infrastructure has changed otherwise. In the near term we can either try running the scripts on linux, or modify the IFO scripts to not do these types of calls.


The solution that's been in effect for the past few months has just been to modify the scripts to not make these kinds of calls.
  180   Fri Dec 7 14:14:48 2007 robMetaphysicsComputer Scripts / Programstdsread problems on Solaris

tdsread has developed a strange new illness, whereby it cannot read EPICS values from two subsystems at once (e.g., getting an LSC and SUS value simultaneously). I thought this might have something to with the fact that both losepics and iscepics are running on the same box,
but the same thing happens with IOO EPICS records, so that's not the culprit.

This is new behaviour, and it's only happening on the solaris machines. I suspect some ENV/cshrc juju has caused it, as the tdsread executable is the same one from April, and I don't think our EPICS infrastructure has changed otherwise. In the near term we can either try running the scripts on linux, or modify the IFO scripts to not do these types of calls.
  1702   Thu Jun 25 17:27:42 2009 ranaUpdateComputerstdsresp on linux
I downloaded the tdsresp.pl from LLO and put it into the various TDS/bin paths. Also updated the LLO specific path stuff. It runs.
  1699   Wed Jun 24 14:43:19 2009 robUpdateComputerstdsresp on linux => pzresp

 

tdsresp is broken on our linux control room machines.  I made a little perl replacement which uses the DiagTools.pm perl module, called pzresp.  It's in the $SCRIPTS/general directory, and so in the path of all the machines.  I also edited the cshrc.40m file so that on linux machines tdsresp points to this perl replacement.

I've patched DiagTools.pm to circumnavigate the tdsdmd bug described here.  I also added a function to DiagTools.pm called diagRespNoLog, which is just like diagResp but without that pesky log file.

 


Here's the output from the tdsresp binary on CentOS:
allegra:~>tdsresp 941.54 10000 100 10 C1:LSC-ITMX_EXC C1:LSC-PD1_Q C1:LSC-PD1_I
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
nan nan nan nan nan nan nan
*** glibc detected *** tdsresp: free(): invalid next size (fast): 0x089483e8 ***
======= Backtrace: =========
/lib/libc.so.6[0xa800f1]
/lib/libc.so.6(cfree+0x90)[0xa83bc0]
/usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6(_ZdlPv+0x21)[0xf7f36571]
tdsresp[0x8057fbb]
tdsresp[0x805b394]
/lib/libc.so.6(__libc_start_main+0xdc)[0xa2ce8c]
tdsresp(__gxx_personality_v0+0x169)[0x804ddd1]
======= Memory map: ========
00242000-00249000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 15400987                           /lib/librt-2.5.so
00249000-0024a000 r--p 00006000 fd:00 15400987                           /lib/librt-2.5.so
0024a000-0024b000 rw-p 00007000 fd:00 15400987                           /lib/librt-2.5.so
009f9000-00a13000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 15400963                           /lib/ld-2.5.so
00a13000-00a14000 r--p 00019000 fd:00 15400963                           /lib/ld-2.5.so
00a14000-00a15000 rw-p 0001a000 fd:00 15400963                           /lib/ld-2.5.so
00a17000-00b55000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 15400974                           /lib/libc-2.5.so
00b55000-00b57000 r--p 0013e000 fd:00 15400974                           /lib/libc-2.5.so
00b57000-00b58000 rw-p 00140000 fd:00 15400974                           /lib/libc-2.5.so
00b58000-00b5b000 rw-p 00b58000 00:00 0 
00b5d000-00b70000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 15400984                           /lib/libpthread-2.5.so
00b70000-00b71000 r--p 00012000 fd:00 15400984                           /lib/libpthread-2.5.so
00b71000-00b72000 rw-p 00013000 fd:00 15400984                           /lib/libpthread-2.5.so
00b72000-00b74000 rw-p 00b72000 00:00 0 
00b76000-00b78000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 15400981                           /lib/libdl-2.5.so
00b78000-00b79000 r--p 00001000 fd:00 15400981                           /lib/libdl-2.5.so
00b79000-00b7a000 rw-p 00002000 fd:00 15400981                           /lib/libdl-2.5.so
00b7c000-00ba1000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 15400975                           /lib/libm-2.5.so
00ba1000-00ba2000 r--p 00024000 fd:00 15400975                           /lib/libm-2.5.so
00ba2000-00ba3000 rw-p 00025000 fd:00 15400975                           /lib/libm-2.5.so
00bca000-00bdd000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 15401011                           /lib/libnsl-2.5.so
00bdd000-00bde000 r--p 00012000 fd:00 15401011                           /lib/libnsl-2.5.so
00bde000-00bdf000 rw-p 00013000 fd:00 15401011                           /lib/libnsl-2.5.so
00bdf000-00be1000 rw-p 00bdf000 00:00 0 
00dca000-00dd5000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 15400986                           /lib/libgcc_s-4.1.2-20080825.so.1
00dd5000-00dd6000 rw-p 0000a000 fd:00 15400986                           /lib/libgcc_s-4.1.2-20080825.so.1
08048000-080b7000 r-xp 00000000 00:17 6455328                            /cvs/cds/caltech/apps/linux/tds/bin/tdsresp
080b7000-080ba000 rw-p 0006e000 00:17 6455328                            /cvs/cds/caltech/apps/linux/tds/bin/tdsresp
080ba000-080bb000 rw-p 080ba000 00:00 0 
0893d000-0896b000 rw-p 0893d000 00:00 0                                  [heap]
f5e73000-f5e74000 ---p f5e73000 00:00 0 
f5e74000-f6874000 rw-p f5e74000 00:00 0 
f692d000-f6931000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 15400995                           /lib/libnss_dns-2.5.so
f6931000-f6932000 r--p 00003000 fd:00 15400995                           /lib/libnss_dns-2.5.so
f6932000-f6933000 rw-p 00004000 fd:00 15400995                           /lib/libnss_dns-2.5.so
f6956000-f6a12000 rw-p f6a31000 00:00 0 
f6a74000-f6a7d000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 15400997                           /lib/libnss_files-2.5.so
f6a7d000-f6a7e000 r--p 00008000 fd:00 15400997                           /lib/libnss_files-2.5.so
f6a7e000-f6a7f000 rw-p 00009000 fd:00 15400997                           /lib/libnss_files-2.5.so
f6a7f000-f6a80000 ---p f6a7f000 00:00 0 
f6a80000-f7480000 rw-p f6a80000 00:00 0 
f7480000-f7481000 ---p f7480000 00:00 0 
f7481000-f7e83000 rw-p f7481000 00:00 0 
f7e83000-f7f63000 r-xp 00000000 fd:00 6236924                            /usr/lib/libstdc++.so.6.0.8
f7f63000-f7f67000 r--p 000df000 fd:00 6236924                            /usr/libAbort

 
  73   Tue Nov 6 23:45:38 2007 tobinConfigurationComputerstektronix scripts!
I cooked up a little script to fetch the data from the networked Tektronix scope. Example usage:

linux2:scripts>tektronix/tek-dump scope0 ch1 foo.csv

"scope0" is the hostname of the scope, "ch1" is the channel you want to dump, and "foo.csv" is the file you want to dump it to. The script is written in Python since Python's libhttp gave me less trouble than Perl's HTTP::Lite.
  1769   Tue Jul 21 17:01:18 2009 peteDAQDAQtemp channel PEM-PETER_FE

I added a temporary channel, to input 9 on the PEM ADCU.    Beware the 30, 31, and 32 inputs.  I tried 32 and it only gave noise.

 

 

  13214   Wed Aug 16 16:05:53 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemp sensor PCB

Tried taking the circuit from the breadboard to the PCB. I attached all the components to adapters that would allow them to be connected to the PCB. From the first picture, the first component is AD586, the second is AD590, and the third is LT1012, along with a resistor across it. I then soldered the connections between the components, as can be seen in the second picture. When I tested out this version of the circuit by hooking it up to the DC source, I got a reading of ~-15V. I will have to check all the connections to make sure there is contact where there should be one, and no contact where there shouldn't be. I had issues attaching the tiny AD590 and LT1012 to its adaptor, so the issue may lie there as well. I'll also check that each component is in working order as well.

Once I figure out where my error is, my plan is to build two more of these and place a metal object such that it contacts only the surface of the AD590s. This would allow me to compare the three values to the actual temperature of the metal, which would then tell me how accurate this setup is.

Note on the resistor: I measured all the resistors and chose three that had exactly 10.00k Ohm. The voltage detected is dependent on the resistor, so if we are to take three identical copies, I ensured that there would be no error due to the resistors being a little different.

Attachment 1: IMG_20170816_154514.jpg
IMG_20170816_154514.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_20170816_154541.jpg
IMG_20170816_154541.jpg
  13224   Thu Aug 17 10:41:58 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemp sensor PCB

Got it to work. One of the connections was faulty. I decided to check the temperature measured against a thermometer. The sensor showed 26.1 C, but the thermometer showed 25.8 C after I let them both cool down after heating them up. The temperature of the thermometer was dropping at the time of measurement, but the temperature of the sensor was not. This is still a rough version of the final sensor, so I'm not sure what exactly causes this discrepancy.

Quote:

Tried taking the circuit from the breadboard to the PCB. I attached all the components to adapters that would allow them to be connected to the PCB. From the first picture, the first component is AD586, the second is AD590, and the third is LT1012, along with a resistor across it. I then soldered the connections between the components, as can be seen in the second picture. When I tested out this version of the circuit by hooking it up to the DC source, I got a reading of ~-15V. I will have to check all the connections to make sure there is contact where there should be one, and no contact where there shouldn't be. I had issues attaching the tiny AD590 and LT1012 to its adaptor, so the issue may lie there as well. I'll also check that each component is in working order as well.

Once I figure out where my error is, my plan is to build two more of these and place a metal object such that it contacts only the surface of the AD590s. This would allow me to compare the three values to the actual temperature of the metal, which would then tell me how accurate this setup is.

Note on the resistor: I measured all the resistors and chose three that had exactly 10.00k Ohm. The voltage detected is dependent on the resistor, so if we are to take three identical copies, I ensured that there would be no error due to the resistors being a little different.

 

Attachment 1: IMG_20170817_095917.jpg
IMG_20170817_095917.jpg
  13232   Mon Aug 21 13:07:08 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemp sensor PCB

On Friday, I cleaned up the circuit so that there are only three connections needed (+15V, -15V, GND) and a BNC connector for reading the output. Today, I added in bypass capacitors. The small yellow ones are 0.1 microF ceramic, and the large ones are 100 microF electrolytic. They are used to stabilize the +15V and -15V inputs to the OP amp and minimize fluctuations, since it doesn't have a regulator for stability. I have also attached the circuit diagram for the OP amp only, where 1 are the electrolytic and 2 are the ceramic. The temperature is still about 2 degrees off, but if that difference is constant for all temperatures in our range we can just calibrate it later.

Here is a helpful link on bypass capacitors (thanks to Kevin for sending it to me).

As a note, the electrolytic capacitors do have a polarity, so it is important to place them correctly (the negative side is towards the lower voltage potential, and not always towards ground).

Quote:

Got it to work. One of the connections was faulty. I decided to check the temperature measured against a thermometer. The sensor showed 26.1 C, but the thermometer showed 25.8 C after I let them both cool down after heating them up. The temperature of the thermometer was dropping at the time of measurement, but the temperature of the sensor was not. This is still a rough version of the final sensor, so I'm not sure what exactly causes this discrepancy.

Quote:

Tried taking the circuit from the breadboard to the PCB. I attached all the components to adapters that would allow them to be connected to the PCB. From the first picture, the first component is AD586, the second is AD590, and the third is LT1012, along with a resistor across it. I then soldered the connections between the components, as can be seen in the second picture. When I tested out this version of the circuit by hooking it up to the DC source, I got a reading of ~-15V. I will have to check all the connections to make sure there is contact where there should be one, and no contact where there shouldn't be. I had issues attaching the tiny AD590 and LT1012 to its adaptor, so the issue may lie there as well. I'll also check that each component is in working order as well.

Once I figure out where my error is, my plan is to build two more of these and place a metal object such that it contacts only the surface of the AD590s. This would allow me to compare the three values to the actual temperature of the metal, which would then tell me how accurate this setup is.

Note on the resistor: I measured all the resistors and chose three that had exactly 10.00k Ohm. The voltage detected is dependent on the resistor, so if we are to take three identical copies, I ensured that there would be no error due to the resistors being a little different.

 

 

Attachment 1: IMG_20170821_124121.jpg
IMG_20170821_124121.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_20170821_124429~2.jpg
IMG_20170821_124429~2.jpg
Attachment 3: IMG_20170821_124108.jpg
IMG_20170821_124108.jpg
  7244   Tue Aug 21 15:26:04 2012 SteveUpdatePEMtemp sensor for vacuum

Temperature sensor for vacuum. How many : 2 or 3 ?  $350 each

Glass encapsulated thermistor #55007  with Ceramabond 835-m glued onto spade connector and hooked up to controller DP25-TH-A with analoge output.

This zero to 10Vdc can go to ADC

  13651   Thu Feb 22 16:16:43 2018 KiraUpdatePEMtemp sensor input

Rewired the temperature sensor inputs to Molex connectors so that we can now attach them to the +/- 15V Sorensens for input instead of using a power supply.

Attachment 1: IMG_20180222_160602.jpg
IMG_20180222_160602.jpg
  13656   Mon Feb 26 16:22:10 2018 KiraUpdatePEMtemp sensor input

[Kira, Gautam]

We began the setup for the lab temperature sensor today. First, we needed to add in a DIN fuse for both temperature sensors, which required us to shut down everything else first. To avoid having to do that next time, we made three instead of two spaces where we have + and - 15V. Attachment 1 shows the new fuses we installed, along with the fuses they connect to. Attachment 2 shows the wiring that we used to connect all the fuses. Attachment 3 shows the labeled long wires that are attached to the lab temperature sensor. The other end is labeled as well. I measured the voltage at the other end of the long cables, and while the -15V one looks good, the +15V one shows only about 13.5V. 

-----

edit (Tuesday) - I set up the other set of cables that will eventually lead to the sensor in the can, but neither of them are showing any voltage on the other end. I'll work on this issue tomorrow.


gautam: some additional remarks about the procedure followed:

  • Wires were tinned with solder to facilitate easier insertion into DIN fuse blocks.
  • ETMX watchdog was shutdown. I then unplugged the satellite box at the X end to avoid any sort of electrical impulse being sent to the optic.
  • Shut down all the sorensens in the EX rack.
  • Tapped new +15VDC and -15 VDC outputs at the EX rack in the locations Kira indicated.
  • Turned Sorensens back on. Checked that all voltages as reported by front panel monitor points were as they were expected to be.
  • Had some trouble getting the modbus IOC going after this work. Kept throwing an error that modbus couldn't be initialized by procserv. Ended up having to reboot c1auxex2, after which it worked fine.
Attachment 1: 1.jpg
1.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_20180226_154649.jpg
IMG_20180226_154649.jpg
Attachment 3: IMG_20180226_154720.jpg
IMG_20180226_154720.jpg
  13660   Wed Feb 28 12:31:28 2018 KiraUpdatePEMtemp sensor input

I switched out the DIN fuses for the long cables and it fixed the issue of them not showing any votage on the other end. At first, the +15V cable worked and the -15V didn't, but when I switched the fuse for the -15V it began working, but the +15V stopped working. I then switched out the fuse for +15V and both cables began showing voltage. But for both the long cables and the shorter ones, they show +13.4V instead of +15V. Not sure what's going on there.

  13209   Tue Aug 15 11:50:21 2017 KiraSummaryPEMtemp sensor packaging/mount

For the final packaging/mounting of the sensor to the seismometer, I have thought of two options.

1. Attach circuit to a PCB board and place it inside the can, while leaving the AD590 open to the air inside the can.

  • This makes sure that the sensor gets a direct measurement of the temperature of the air in the can, as it is exposed to the air. 
  • But, it takes a limited area of measurement, so it could be the case that the area we place it in happens to be a hot or cold pocket, and the measurement would be inaccurate.
  • This can be solved by placing multiple copies of the circuit in various places of the can and averaging the values.

2. Attach the AD590 to a copper plate with thermal paste and put it into a pomona box.

  • This solves the problem of having a limited sample area the first option had, as the copper plate should have a uniform temp distribution, thus we are sampling the temp of that whole area.
  • Need to make sure that the response time to the temperature variations of copper is less than the frequency that we are measuring.
  • This can be calculated using equations for heat transfer (listed below).

If anyone has input on which method is preferred or any additional options that we may have, I would appreciate it.

Heat transfer:

q = k A dT / s

  • k = thermal conductivity
  • A = area
  • dT = temperature gradient
  • s = thickness

For copper, k = 401 W/mK, x = 1.27 mm, A = 2.66x10^-3 m^2 (for the particular copper plate I measured), dT = 1K (assume). Thus the heat transfer will be 839 J/s.

I'm not completely sure what to do with this yet, but it could help us decide whether the copper plate option will be useful for us.

 

  13285   Fri Sep 1 15:46:12 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemp sensor update

I took off the AD590 and attached it to two long wires leading out from the board. This will allow us to attach the sensor to a metal block and not have to stick the whole board to it. I have also completed three identical copies of this and it's pretty much ready to be tested. According to Craig and Andrew's elog here, the sensor is very noisy and they added in a low pass filter to fix that, so that's something to consider for the final version of the circuit. I'll test what I have so far and see how that goes. We still need to figure out how to get readings from the sensors.

To attach the sensor to the metal block, I'll use some thermal paste and fasteners. I'll also put a thermometer on the block to record the actual temperature. I'll then wrap it in some insulation we have in the lab and have only some wires leading out of it to make measurements. I'll leave this setup overnight and record the outputs for about a full day. The fluctuations between the sensors will then indicate the noise of each individual sensor.

Attachment 1: IMG_20170901_144729.jpg
IMG_20170901_144729.jpg
  13295   Tue Sep 5 17:18:17 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemp sensor update

Today, I stuck on the sensors to a metal block using a flag, rubber bands, and some thermal paste (1st attachment). I then wrapped the whole thing in about 4 layers of insulation and a lot of tape (2nd attachment). The only things leading out of the box were the three connections to the sensors and a thermometer. I then connected the wires to their respective places on the board of the sensor. To get the readings out we would need to use an ADC. Gautam and I checked to make sure the ADC we have inside the lab goes from -10V to 10V so that it would be able to measure the 3V value the sensor typically measures. We then tried to connect all three sensors to a DC source simultaneously, but unfortunately one of them seems to have disconnected somewhere during the process, as it only showed 1.2V instead of 3V. I plan to fix this tomorrow morning so that we can hopefully set this up soon.

Quote:

I took off the AD590 and attached it to two long wires leading out from the board. This will allow us to attach the sensor to a metal block and not have to stick the whole board to it. I have also completed three identical copies of this and it's pretty much ready to be tested. According to Craig and Andrew's elog here, the sensor is very noisy and they added in a low pass filter to fix that, so that's something to consider for the final version of the circuit. I'll test what I have so far and see how that goes. We still need to figure out how to get readings from the sensors.

To attach the sensor to the metal block, I'll use some thermal paste and fasteners. I'll also put a thermometer on the block to record the actual temperature. I'll then wrap it in some insulation we have in the lab and have only some wires leading out of it to make measurements. I'll leave this setup overnight and record the outputs for about a full day. The fluctuations between the sensors will then indicate the noise of each individual sensor.

 

Attachment 1: IMG_20170905_144924.jpg
IMG_20170905_144924.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_20170905_165042.jpg
IMG_20170905_165042.jpg
  13296   Tue Sep 5 17:52:06 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemp sensor update

to get the sensors to read the same values they have to be in direct thermal contact with the metal block - there can't be any adapter board in-between

for the 2nd attempt, I also recommend encasing it in a metal block rather than just one side. You can drill some 7-10 mm diameter holes in an aluminum or copper block. Then put the sensors in there and plug it up with some thermal paste.

  13303   Fri Sep 8 10:22:30 2017 SteveUpdatePEMtemp sensor update

The weight of SS can with copper liner  is 12.2 kg

Is 1 Amp for the heating jacket going to be enough? We should have some headroom.

Quote:

to get the sensors to read the same values they have to be in direct thermal contact with the metal block - there can't be any adapter board in-between

for the 2nd attempt, I also recommend encasing it in a metal block rather than just one side. You can drill some 7-10 mm diameter holes in an aluminum or copper block. Then put the sensors in there and plug it up with some thermal paste.

 

  13311   Tue Sep 12 11:44:16 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemp sensor update

Got it to work. A cable was broken and the AD586 also broke at the same time so it took a while to find the problem. I had to create a makeshift cable out of three parts so once I replace it for an actual cable, it will be good to go for a test.

Quote:

Today, I stuck on the sensors to a metal block using a flag, rubber bands, and some thermal paste (1st attachment). I then wrapped the whole thing in about 4 layers of insulation and a lot of tape (2nd attachment). The only things leading out of the box were the three connections to the sensors and a thermometer. I then connected the wires to their respective places on the board of the sensor. To get the readings out we would need to use an ADC. Gautam and I checked to make sure the ADC we have inside the lab goes from -10V to 10V so that it would be able to measure the 3V value the sensor typically measures. We then tried to connect all three sensors to a DC source simultaneously, but unfortunately one of them seems to have disconnected somewhere during the process, as it only showed 1.2V instead of 3V. I plan to fix this tomorrow morning so that we can hopefully set this up soon.

Quote:

I took off the AD590 and attached it to two long wires leading out from the board. This will allow us to attach the sensor to a metal block and not have to stick the whole board to it. I have also completed three identical copies of this and it's pretty much ready to be tested. According to Craig and Andrew's elog here, the sensor is very noisy and they added in a low pass filter to fix that, so that's something to consider for the final version of the circuit. I'll test what I have so far and see how that goes. We still need to figure out how to get readings from the sensors.

To attach the sensor to the metal block, I'll use some thermal paste and fasteners. I'll also put a thermometer on the block to record the actual temperature. I'll then wrap it in some insulation we have in the lab and have only some wires leading out of it to make measurements. I'll leave this setup overnight and record the outputs for about a full day. The fluctuations between the sensors will then indicate the noise of each individual sensor.

 

 

  1161   Mon Nov 24 19:15:16 2008 rana, alberto, johnConfigurationEnvironmenttemperature
The PSL Room Temperature was alarming because it had gone above 23 C. This set off an unfortunate chain of events:

We found that the PSL HEPA was set low (20%). This is a fine setting for when no one is working in there but it
does raise the temperature since there are heat sources inside the blue box.

We tried to change the office area temperature to compensate and also the westmost sensor inside the lab area by 2 deg F.

The office area one was problematic - there was so much dust in it that the gas valve nipple was clogged. So we've
now blown it all clean with a compressed air can. We're now tuning the calibration screw to make our new
digital sensor agree with the setpoint on the controller.

Expect wild temperature swings of the office area for a couple days while Alberto and I tune the servo.
  1163   Tue Nov 25 19:29:15 2008 rana, alberto, johnConfigurationEnvironmenttemperature

Quote:
The PSL Room Temperature was alarming because it had gone above 23 C. This set off an unfortunate chain of events:

We found that the PSL HEPA was set low (20%). This is a fine setting for when no one is working in there but it
does raise the temperature since there are heat sources inside the blue box.

We tried to change the office area temperature to compensate and also the westmost sensor inside the lab area by 2 deg F.

The office area one was problematic - there was so much dust in it that the gas valve nipple was clogged. So we've
now blown it all clean with a compressed air can. We're now tuning the calibration screw to make our new
digital sensor agree with the setpoint on the controller.

Expect wild temperature swings of the office area for a couple days while Alberto and I tune the servo.


This morning Bob found 92F in the office area and in the control room of the lab. He turned down the thermostat and when I got in at about 9 I found 65. After a few hours of adjustment of the thermostat's calibration, I could stabilize the room temperature to about 72F. I also turned down the thermostats inside the lab of a couple of degrees F.
  1164   Thu Nov 27 22:56:42 2008 ranaConfigurationEnvironmenttemperature
8-)
Attachment 1: mc.png
mc.png
  13611   Tue Feb 6 16:58:19 2018 KiraUpdatePEMtemperature measurements

I decided to plot the temperatures measured over two days for the sensor inside the can and inside the lab just to see if there was any significant difference between the two, and obtained the following plot. This shows that there is a difference in measurements of a few 0.01 C. The insulated seismometer can didn't change temperature as much as the lab did, which is as expected. I'll work on properly calibrating the sensors sometime in the future so that we can use the sensor that's just in the lab as an accurate thermometer.

Attachment 1: temps.png
temps.png
  1331   Sun Feb 22 23:43:07 2009 carynSummaryGeneraltemperature sensor

Comparing  PSL-FSS-RMTEMP and PEM-MC1-TEMPS

So, to compare temp channels, I made a plot of PSL-FSS_RMTEMP and PEM-MC1_TEMPS(the test temp sensor channel after converting from cts to degC). This plot begins about 2 months ago t_initial=911805130. The temperature channels look kinda similar but MC1-TEMPS (the temp sensor clamped to MC1,3 chamber) is consistently higher in temperature than FSS_RMTEMP. See compare_temperature_channels.png.

MC1-TEMPS isn't exactly consistent with FSS-RMTEMP. I attached a few plots where I've zoomed in on a few hours or a few days. See compare_temperature_channels_zoom1.pdf & compare_temperature_channels_zoom2.pdf

Change the room temperature, see what happens to the chamber temperature

A while ago, somebody was fiddling around with the room temperature.  See compare_temperature_channels_zoom4.pdf.  This is a plot of PEM-MC1_TEMPS and PSL-FSS_RMTEMP at t0=911805130. You can see the chamber heating up and cooling down in happy-capacitory-fashion. Although, the PSL-FSS_RMTEMP and the PEM-MC1_TEMPS don't really line up so well. Maybe, the air in the location of the MC1,3 chamber is just warmer than the air in the PSL or maybe there's an offset in my calibration equation.

Calibration equation for PEM-MC1-TEMPS

For the calibration (cts to degC) I used the following equation based on the data-sheet for the LM34 and some measurements of the circuit:

TEMPERATURE[degC]=5/9*(((-CTS/16384/451.9/1.04094)-(.0499*10^-3))/(20*10^-6)-35);

How does the chamber temperature compare with the air temperature?

It looks like the chamber may be warmer than the air around it sometimes.

I wanted to check the temperature of the air and compare it with the temperature the sensor had been measuring. So, at t=918855087 gps, I took the temp sensor off of the mc1-mc3 chamber and let it hang freely, close to the chamber but not touching anything. See compare_temperature_chamber_air.png. MC1_TEMPS increases in temperature when I am handling the temp-sensor and then cools down to below the chamber temperature, close to FSS_RMTEMP, indicating the air temperature was less than the chamber temperature.

 When, I reattached temp sensor to the chamber at t=919011131 gps, the the temperature of the chamber was again higher than the temperature of the air. See compare_temperature_air2chamber.pdf.

Also, as one might expect, when the temp-sensor is clamped to the chamber, the temperature varies less, & when it's detached from the chamber, the temperature varies more. See compare_temperature_air_1day.pdf & compare_temperature_chamber_1day.pdf.

New temp-sensor power supply vs old temp-sensor power supply

The new temp-sensor is less noisy and seems to work OK. It's not completely consistent with PSL-FSS_RMTEMP, but neither was the old temp-sensor. And even the air just outside the chamber isn't the same temperature as the chamber. So, the channels shouldn't line up perfectly anyways.

I unplugged the 'old' temp-sensor power supply for a few hours and plugged in the 'new' one, which doesn't have a box but has some capacitors and and 2 more voltage regulators. The MC1_TEMPS channel became less noisy. See noisetime.png & noisefreq.pdf. For that time, the minute trend shows that with the old temp-sensor power supply the temp sensor varies +/-30cts and with the new power supply, it is more like +/-5cts (and Volt/16,384cts * 1degF/10mV -->  apprx +/-0.03degF). So, it's less noisy. 

I kept the new temp-sensor power supply plugged in for about 8 hours, checking if new temp sensor power supply worked ok. Compared it with PSL-FSS_RMTEMP after applying an approximate calibration equation. See ver2_mc1_rmtemp_8hr_appxcal.png.

Just for kicks

Measuring time constant of temp sensor when detached from chamber. At 918858981, I heated up the temp sensor on of the mc1-mc3 chamber with my hand. Took hand off sensor at  918859253 and let it cool down to the room temperature. See temperature_sensor_tau.pdf. 

Attachment 1: compare_temperature_channels.png
compare_temperature_channels.png
Attachment 2: compare_temperature_channels_zoom1.pdf
compare_temperature_channels_zoom1.pdf
Attachment 3: compare_temperature_channels_zoom2.pdf
compare_temperature_channels_zoom2.pdf
Attachment 4: compare_temperature_channels_zoom4.pdf
compare_temperature_channels_zoom4.pdf
Attachment 5: compare_temperature_chamber_air.png
compare_temperature_chamber_air.png
Attachment 6: compare_temperature_air2chamber.pdf
compare_temperature_air2chamber.pdf
Attachment 7: compare_temperature_air_1day.pdf
compare_temperature_air_1day.pdf
Attachment 8: compare_temperature_chamber_1day.pdf
compare_temperature_chamber_1day.pdf
Attachment 9: noisetime.pdf
noisetime.pdf
Attachment 10: noisefreq.pdf
noisefreq.pdf
Attachment 11: ver2_mc1_rmtemp_8hr_appxcal.pdf
ver2_mc1_rmtemp_8hr_appxcal.pdf
Attachment 12: temperature_sensor_tau.pdf
temperature_sensor_tau.pdf
  13183   Thu Aug 10 14:13:23 2017 KiraSummaryPEMtemperature sensor

Goal is to build a temperature sensor accurate to 1 mK. Schematic is shown below. This does not take into account the DC gain that occurs.

Parts that would be used for this: LM317 regulator, AD592 temperature transducer, OP amp (low input noise and high impedance), 100K (or maybe 10k) resistor. This is what is currently proposed, but the exact parts we use could be changed to better fit the sensor. The resistor and the OP amp will be decided depending on the output of the AD592.

Once this is built, I would like to create a few copies of it and put them into an insulated container and measure the output from each one. This would allow us to calculate the temperature noise of the circuit, as we can take out the variations due to temperature changes inside the container by comparing the outputs.

I can also model the noise in the circuit to see how much noise there is before building it. There are three terms to the noise that we have, and we need to decide which one dominates at low frequencies.

Our final goal is to create an additional circuit that could cancel out the DC gain. I have attached an additional schematic proposed by Rana that would help with this issue. I will leave this second half for when the first part works.

Attachment 1: IMG_20170810_121637~2.jpg
IMG_20170810_121637~2.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_20170810_134422~2.jpg
IMG_20170810_134422~2.jpg
  13188   Thu Aug 10 21:22:06 2017 ranaSummaryPEMtemperature sensor
  • Should we use the AD590 or the AD592? They're sort of the same, but have slightly different packages and specs.
  • Given the sensitivity of the AD590 to power supply drift, I would recommend using a precision voltage reference like the AD581 or AD587. Take a look at the datasheets and order a few different varieties so we can see what works best for us. I believe that the voltage regulators have too much drift to use for precision temperature control.
  • The AD590 datasheet has a few example circuits showing how we can subtract off the offset which comes the 1 uA/K coefficient of the AD590 (i.e. we would have 295 uA at room temperature, trying to stabilize to +/- 0.1 K)
  • For the first prototypes its fine to use some solderable protoboard assembly, but we will eventually have to figure out how to package this thing and interface it with our Acromag slow controls system.

also, I've attached some temperature noise spectra from the LISA group at the AEI in Hannover. It will be interesting to see if we get the same results.

Attachment 1: tempsensnoise2.pdf
tempsensnoise2.pdf
Attachment 2: tempnoise_final.pdf
tempnoise_final.pdf
  13190   Fri Aug 11 10:27:49 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemperature sensor

Since there seems to be little difference between AD590 and AD592, I guess we could just go with the AD590. The temperature noise spectrum in the first graph are for the AD590, so if we want to reproduce those results, we should use AD590.

For the AD581/AD587, we could go with a few varieties that have the least output voltage drift, although I am not sure what precision we will need. So maybe we could try AD587U and AD581L. We could also try AD587K and AD581K and see if those work as well.

We will also need to calibrate the sensor, as it takes an input of 5V, but the AD581/AD587 provides 10V, which will give about a 1 degree error according to the datasheet. It does state that this is only a calibration error, so it shouldn't be too much of an issue.

I will figure out the packaging once I construct the sensor and verify that it works. Maybe we could use a box similar to the existing sensor, but it depends on the size of the finished circuit.

  13191   Fri Aug 11 10:48:39 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemperature sensor

Quick update: we actually have AD587KRZ and AD592, so we could start by using that and seeing how it works.

  13193   Fri Aug 11 11:56:02 2017 ranaUpdatePEMtemperature sensor

Might as well order several of a few different varieties today. Its good to have some extra in stock; we don't always want to have to wait days for parts to show up. If you give Steve a list of parts to buy he can order them today or Monday.

There should also be some precision 5V sources (e.g. AD586) that you can try.

  13194   Fri Aug 11 12:27:25 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemperature sensor

Used AD592CNZ and AD586 (5V output) to create a circuit that works and is responsive to temperature changes. At room temp, using ~1K resistor, it showed ~0.3V across it, as expected. The voltage went up when we heated it with a heating gun. Next step will be to add in an OP amp and design some experiments to check to see how accurate it is. Thanks to Gautam for helping me with it!

I have attached the working circuit and a close up of the connections.

Attachment 1: IMG_20170811_121608.jpg
IMG_20170811_121608.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_20170811_121619.jpg
IMG_20170811_121619.jpg
  13202   Mon Aug 14 09:49:18 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemperature sensor

Decided to try adding in an OP amp just to see if it would work. Added LT1012 and a 100k resistor to the circuit (I originally wanted to do AD743 as it seems to be the best choice according to Zach's elog here, but it said that they are very precious so I went with LT1012 for testing purposes). When heating it with a heating gun, the output voltage went down by a few 0.01V. The maximum voltage was 0.686V. Similar thing happened when I switched to a 10k resistor, where the maximum was 0.705V and it also went down by a few 0.01V upon heating.

I've attached a few pictures showing the circuit.

Attachment 1: IMG_20170814_092452.jpg
IMG_20170814_092452.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_20170814_092513.jpg
IMG_20170814_092513.jpg
  13203   Mon Aug 14 12:52:33 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemperature sensor

I didn't realize that the LT1012 needed an additional input to function. I added in +15V and -15V to pins 7 and 4, respectively and placed a 10k resistor and the numbers make more sense now. The voltage showed a negative value, but it became more negative as I heated it up (it's negative due to how a transimpedance amplifier works).

I have attached the new setup and the value it shows (~-3V). It became more negative by about 0.4V, which translates to about a 40K increase in temperature, which makes sense.

In addition, I have attached an updated sketch of the circuit. I will need to do more testing to determine how accurate this is. The next step would be to calculate how much noise there is currently and figure out how to remove this circuit from the breadboard and use a PCB or something like that for final testing in an insulated container.

The reason I chose AD743 initially for the OP amp is because at low frequencies (which is what we are working with), a FET amp such as AD743 will have a low current noise at high impedance, which is what we have in this case. While a FET amp has high voltage noise compared to other OP amps, the current noise becomes more important at high impedance, so it will work better. According to Zach's graphs, the AD743 is best at high impedances, followed by LT1012.

Quote:

Decided to try adding in an OP amp just to see if it would work. Added LT1012 and a 100k resistor to the circuit (I originally wanted to do AD743 as it seems to be the best choice according to Zach's elog here, but it said that they are very precious so I went with LT1012 for testing purposes). When heating it with a heating gun, the output voltage went down by a few 0.01V. The maximum voltage was 0.686V. Similar thing happened when I switched to a 10k resistor, where the maximum was 0.705V and it also went down by a few 0.01V upon heating.

I've attached a few pictures showing the circuit.

 

Attachment 1: IMG_20170814_121131.jpg
IMG_20170814_121131.jpg
Attachment 2: IMG_20170814_121139.jpg
IMG_20170814_121139.jpg
Attachment 3: IMG_20170814_121758~2.jpg
IMG_20170814_121758~2.jpg
  13210   Tue Aug 15 13:32:38 2017 KiraUpdatePEMtemperature sensor

Tested to make sure that even when only the AD586 was heated that there was no change in the reading. I did so by placing the AD586 away from the rest of the circuit and blowing hot air only on it. There was, in fact, no change. 

Quote:

I didn't realize that the LT1012 needed an additional input to function. I added in +15V and -15V to pins 7 and 4, respectively and placed a 10k resistor and the numbers make more sense now. The voltage showed a negative value, but it became more negative as I heated it up (it's negative due to how a transimpedance amplifier works).

I have attached the new setup and the value it shows (~-3V). It became more negative by about 0.4V, which translates to about a 40K increase in temperature, which makes sense.

In addition, I have attached an updated sketch of the circuit. I will need to do more testing to determine how accurate this is. The next step would be to calculate how much noise there is currently and figure out how to remove this circuit from the breadboard and use a PCB or something like that for final testing in an insulated container.

The reason I chose AD743 initially for the OP amp is because at low frequencies (which is what we are working with), a FET amp such as AD743 will have a low current noise at high impedance, which is what we have in this case. While a FET amp has high voltage noise compared to other OP amps, the current noise becomes more important at high impedance, so it will work better. According to Zach's graphs, the AD743 is best at high impedances, followed by LT1012.

Quote:

Decided to try adding in an OP amp just to see if it would work. Added LT1012 and a 100k resistor to the circuit (I originally wanted to do AD743 as it seems to be the best choice according to Zach's elog here, but it said that they are very precious so I went with LT1012 for testing purposes). When heating it with a heating gun, the output voltage went down by a few 0.01V. The maximum voltage was 0.686V. Similar thing happened when I switched to a 10k resistor, where the maximum was 0.705V and it also went down by a few 0.01V upon heating.

I've attached a few pictures showing the circuit.

 

 

  1102   Thu Oct 30 20:39:47 2008 carynConfigurationPEMtemperature sensor
We attached the temperature sensor box to the MC1/MC3 chamber with a C-clamp. We connected the temp sensor to a 2nd box with a short BNC. Bob set up a power cable coming from the X-end towards the MC1/MC3 chamber(Thanks, Bob!) We soldered the end of Bob's power cable to a plug and attached it to the 2nd box (The power supply enters through the 2nd box). A ~20ft BNC cable connects the output signal of the 2nd box to the tall thing by the PSL where all the signals go labeled 1Y2. Once we had everything connected, we put in the fuses for the power supply. So, now the temperature sensor is receiving power. We checked that the power supply was working (we measured +15.08V and -14.95V, and we wanted 15V and -15V so it's OK for now). Tomorrow we will modify C1IOOF.INI file and reboot the frame builder.

About sensor-
There is an LM34 (looks like a transistor) glued w/ epoxy and thermal paste to the inside of a Pomona box ~1"x"1.5"x2". The lid to the box is covered with a 1-2mm thick piece of copper and a little thermal paste is sandwiched between the Pomona lid and the copper piece. A C-clamp attaches the copper piece to the chamber. A BNC is connected to one side of the box (the side with less copper)

About power supply box-
There is a power regulator and an op-amp inside a Pomona box ~2.5"x4"x2". The power regulator is attached to the center of lid of the pomona box with a screw and washer. There's a power plug on the front of the box
Left:+15V:red wire
Center:GND:white wire
Right:-15V:black wire
There are 2 BNC connections on the sides of the box. The left BNC connection is for the output signal and the right BNC connection is for the temperature sensor (if the power plug is coming out of the box towards you).

Sensor location-
Chamber which contains MC1/MC3. On the door facing towards the Y-end. On the bottom-left side. Behind the door. Attached with a C-clamp.

Power supply box location-
Chamber which contains MC1/MC3. On some metal leg thing near the floor facing towards the Y-end. Attached with a zip-tie

Power supply-
Coming from the X-end from a tall thing with all the fuses labeled 1X1
Fuse 160:+15V:red wire
Fuse 171:GND:white wire
Fuse 172:-15V:black wire

Signal-
Going towards the PSL to the tall thing labeled 1Y1 on the rack labeled SN208
ICS-110B
J12 (which we believe corresponds to 50-51 and channel number 13650)
Temperature sensor is connected to J12 with a ~20ft BNC attached to a BNC2LEMO connector we found lying around
  6731   Thu May 31 16:19:07 2012 yutaUpdateGreen Lockingtemperature setting for PSL doubling crystal

I fixed the temperature control of the oven for the PSL doubling crystal.
The PID settings were not good, and also, TC200 was beging DETUNED. So, I activated TUNE function and adjusted PID settings.
I'm not sure what the DETUNE function is for. The manual can be found here;
   http://www.thorlabs.com/thorproduct.cfm?partnumber=TC200

Current settings for Thorlabs TC200 are (Red ones are what I changed from the previous setting);

parameters Xend Yend PSL
TEMP SET (deg C) 37.5 35.7 36.9
P 250 250 250
I 60 60 200 (was 117)
D 25 25 40 (was 19)
(DE)TUNE on? TUNE TUNE TUNE (was DETUNE)
TMAX (deg C) 200 200 170
PMAX (Watts) 18 18 18
temperature sensor PTC100 PTC100 PTC100
  11131   Wed Mar 11 13:54:18 2015 SteveUpdateGeneraltemporaly storage in the east arm

Green glass for aLIGO OMC shield is temporarly stored in the inside of the Y-arm.

Attachment 1: greenG.jpg
greenG.jpg
Attachment 2: EastArm.jpg
EastArm.jpg
  12174   Tue Jun 14 10:13:34 2016 SteveUpdateVACtemporary N2 supply line

The drill room floor will be retiled Thursday, June 16. Temporary nitrogen line set up will allow emptying the hole area.

 

Ifo room entry will be through control room.

 

Attachment 1: afterN2work.png
afterN2work.png
  4113   Wed Jan 5 16:11:17 2011 kiwamuSummaryIOOtemporary PZT connection

PZTconnection.png

This is a connection diagram for the input PZTs (i.e. PZT1 and PZT2).

As drawn in the diagram, the signals don't go through the anti-imaging filter D000186 in the current configuration.

  2   Thu Oct 18 14:52:35 2007 ranaRoutineASCtest
test

X-(:P;(:))
  12763   Fri Jan 27 17:49:41 2017 jamieUpdateCDStest of new daqd code on fb1

Just FYI I'm running a test of updated daqd code on fb1. 

fb1 has it's own fiber to the daq network switch, so nothing had to be modified to do this test. This *should* not affect anything in the rest of the system, but as we all know these are famous last words....  If something is going haywire, and you can't get in touch with me and can't figure what else to do, you can just log on to fb1 and shut it down.  It's not writing any data to any of the network filesystems.

The daqd code under test is from the latest advLigoRTS 3.2.1 tag, which has daqd stability fixes that will hopefully address the problems we were seeing last time I tried this upgrade.  We'll see...

I'm going to let it run over the weekend, and will check in periodically.

  12765   Fri Jan 27 20:52:36 2017 gautamUpdateCDStest of new daqd code on fb1

I'm not sure if this is related, but since today morning, I've noticed that the data concentrator errors have returned. Looking at daqd.log, there is a 1 second timing mismatch error that is being generated. Usually, manually running ntpdate on the front ends fixes this problem, but it did not work today.

Attachment 1: DCerrors.png
DCerrors.png
  12769   Sat Jan 28 12:05:57 2017 jamieUpdateCDStest of new daqd code on fb1
Quote:

I'm not sure if this is related, but since today morning, I've noticed that the data concentrator errors have returned. Looking at daqd.log, there is a 1 second timing mismatch error that is being generated. Usually, manually running ntpdate on the front ends fixes this problem, but it did not work today.

If this problem started before ~4pm on Friday then it's probably unrelated, since I didn't start any of these tests until after that.  If unexplained problem persist then we can try shutting of the fb1 daqd and see if that helps.

  3625   Thu Sep 30 11:07:20 2010 josephb, alexUpdateCDStest points starting to work

The centos 5.5 compiled gds code is currently living on rosalba in the /opt/app directory (this is local to Rosalba only).  It has not been fully compiled properly yet.  It is still missing ezcaread/write/ and so forth.  Once we have a fully working code, we'll propagate it to the correct directories on linux1.

So to have a working dtt session with the new front ends, log into rosalba, go to opt/apps/, and source gds-env.bash in /opt/apps (you need to be in bash for this to work, Alex has not made a tcsh environment script yet).  This will let get testpoints and be able to make transfer function measurements, for example

Also, to build the latest awgtpman, got to fb, go to /opt/rtcds/caltech/c1/core/advLigoRTS/src/gds, and type make.  This has been done and mentioned just as reference.

The awgtpman along with the front end models should startup automatically on reboot of c1sus (courtesy of the /etc/rc.local file).

  2306   Fri Nov 20 11:14:22 2009 josephb, alexConfigurationComputerstest points working on megatron and we may have filters with switch outputs built in

Alex tooked at the channel definitions (can be seen in tpchn_C1.par), and noticed the rmid was 0. 

However, we had set in testpoint.par the tst system to C-node1 instead of C-node0.  The final number inf that and the rmid need to be equal.   We have changed this, and the test points appear to be working now.

However, the confusing part is in the tst model, the gds_node_id is set to 1.  Apparently, the model starts counting at 1, while the code starts counting at 0, so when you edit the testpoint.par file by hand, you have to subtract one from whatever you set in the model.

In other news, Alex pointed me at a CDS_PARTS.mdl, filters, "IIR FM with controls".  Its a light green module with 2 inputs and 2 outputs.  While the 2nd set of input and outputs look like they connect to ground, they should be iterpreted by the RCG to do the right thing (although Alex wasn't positive it works, it worth trying it and seeing if the 2nd output corresponds to a usable filter on/off switch to connect to the binary I/O to control analog DW.  However, I'm not sure it has the sophistication to wait for a zero crossing or anything like that - at the moment, it just looks like a simple on/off switch based on what filters are on/off.

  13684   Thu Mar 15 17:33:56 2018 KiraUpdatePEMtest setup

I have attached the setup I completed today. The metal box contains the heater circuit and the board for the temperature sensor is right above it. This is basically the same setup as before, but I've just packaged everything up neater. I expect to be able to perform the test tomorrow and begin implementing PID control. I still need a DAC input for the heater circuit and the temperature sensor is having some issues as well.

Attachment 1: IMG_20180315_172512.jpg
IMG_20180315_172512.jpg
  13691   Tue Mar 20 16:56:01 2018 KiraUpdatePEMtest setup

The MOSFET was getting pretty hot, so I switched it out to a larger heat sink and it's fine now. I then used a function generator in place of the DAC to provide ~3.5V. I got the current in the circuit to 1.7A, which is as expected, since we have 24V input, the heater resistance is 12.5ohm and the resistor we are using is 1ohm, so 24V/(12.5+1)ohm = 1.7A. The temperature inside the can rose about 5 degrees in half an hour. The only issue now is the voltage regulators and OP amp inside the box get hot, though it doesn't seem to be dangerous. I switched the function generator input to a DAC and Gautam set it to 1.5V. If it works, then we'll leave this on overnight and work on the PID control tomorrow. I've attached images of the current heater circuit box when it is open and the new heat sink for the MOSFET.


gautam: we also tried incorporating the EPICS channels from the Acromag into the RTCDS so that we can implement PID control by using Foton. I tried doing this using the "EpicsIn" and "EpicsOut" blocks from CDS_PARTS. While the model recompiled smoothly, I saw no signals in the filter module i had connected in series with the EpicsIn block. So I just reverted c1pem to its original state and recompiled the model. Guess we will stick to python script PID reading EPICS channels to implement the PID servo.

Attachment 1: IMG_20180320_154516.jpg
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Attachment 2: IMG_20180320_145957.jpg
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  13692   Tue Mar 20 19:48:10 2018 gautamUpdatePEMtest setup

according to the temp sensor readout, which was ~-3.35V which corresponds to ~335K, the temperature of the can is now 60 deg C. This is a bit warm for my liking so i'm turning the heater current down to 0 now by writing 0 to C1:PEM-SEIS_EX_TEMP_CTRL

  13700   Fri Mar 23 12:00:20 2018 ranaUpdatePEMtest setup

we don't ever want to use our 16 kHz real time system for such low frequency action; its main purpose is for real-time controls, whereas we are OK with multiple seconds of delay in a thermal loop. The Python PID script is sufficient and highly reliable (after years of testing).

  13701   Fri Mar 23 12:45:08 2018 KiraUpdatePEMtest setup

I fit the data that we got from the test. The time constant for the cooling came out to be about 4.5 hours. The error is quite large and we should add a low pass filter to the temperature sensor eventually in order to minimize the noise of the measurements.

Attachment 1: seis_fit.png
seis_fit.png
  13859   Thu May 17 15:38:19 2018 KiraUpdatePEMtest setup with seismometer

I've moved my setup to the actual seismometer. I attached the temperature sensor to the seismometer (attachment 1) with duct tape, though this is temporary. I will be monitoring the temperature fluctuations of the seismometer for a whole day then take the can off and repeat the test. The can isn't clamped down so the insulation isn't perfect, so I'd expect to see some noticeable fluctuations even with the can on. I've also labeled the long cable for the temperatuse sensor readout (attachments 2 and 3). There will also be an out of loop sensor added in later, but for this test since I am not running the loop it doesn't matter which sensor I monitor. Attachment 4 is a picture of the current setup.

Attachment 1: IMG_20180517_144420.jpg
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Attachment 2: IMG_20180517_145754.jpg
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Attachment 3: IMG_20180517_151956.jpg
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Attachment 4: IMG_20180517_145121.jpg
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