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Message ID: 8830     Entry time: Thu Jul 11 13:52:51 2013
Author: Charles 
Type: Update 
Category: ISS 
Subject: RMS threshold detection and triggering 

There are essentially two major portions of the ISS I am designing. One system has the voltage reference, differential amplifier and filtering servo (schematic attached) while the other has a comparator circuit and a triggering mechanism. The first system amplifies an error signal obtained from the PD output and the voltage reference, which is then fed back through the AOM. I've done a lot of work designing/prototyping this first half and now I'm starting to design the second half.

The second system's main purpose is to maintain loop stability as the ISS is engaged. Let's assume a user has decided they want noise suppression. They would first close the ISS feedback loop and an error signal would pass through three unity-gain buffers, providing minimal noise reduction. The user can then send a signal to theTRIGGER 1 port to switch the first stage from its unity-gain position to its filtering position and reduce the intensity noise further. This signal will most likely be digital in origin. Alternatively, when the user first closes the ISS loop, the first stage can already be in its filtering position rather than necessitating two commands.

A test channel (not drawn in the included schematic) will monitor the RMS level of the incoming signal from the PD. This noisy AC signal will first be amplified and then passed through an RMS-to-DC converter. The resulting DC signal is used as a part of the triggering mechanism for later stages. Once the first stage has been switched manually, and the DC signal corresponding to RMS noise of the PD output drops below a certain threshold, stages 2 and 3 will be internally triggered with a short delay between them. Toward being able to detect this threshold, I have designed a simple comparator circuit with an LT1016. The circuit has a fairly low-level output when the input voltage is larger than the threshold (about 1.6 V for my simple prototype), but when the input passes below the threshold, the comparator puts out almost 4 V, a number limited by the supply voltage. The schematic is shown below.

Simple_Comparator_Circuit.png

The component V2 and the various voltage dividers serve to establish the reference/threshold voltage. Note that although the LT1016 is not powered in the schematic, it requires ±5 V (a max of 7 V). The above circuit was also prototyped on a breadboard and I characterized it with an oscilloscope. Using a CFG253, I made a low frequency (~0.3 Hz) triangle wave with an amplitude and DC offset such that it oscillates between 0 and 5 V. This was applied to the IN node in the above schematic. The input waveform and the circuit's response (voltage at the OUT node) are shown below. As expected, R2 serves to establish hysteresis. The comparator switches to 'high' output until the input drops below 1.6 V, and then it doesn't switch back to the 'low' output until the input goes up to ~3.4 V.

F0001TEK.JPG

This behavior is ideal for our application as we can detect when the DC signal from the RMS-to-DC converter drops below a certain level (i.e. the first stage that has been activated does some amount of filtering to lower RMS noise), and then we can trigger subsequent filter stages off of the comparators high-level output. 

This circuit could easily be used to drive the MAX333a switches shown in the first schematic attached. I believe the low-level output is not sufficient to switch the MAX333a although the ~4 V high-level output is quite sufficient. Regardless, these exact values (thresholds, outputs etc) will be determined after I have a better idea of the RMS noise of the laser without any intensity stabilization as well as a solid understanding of how the AD8436 RMS-to-DC converter works. This was simply a proof of concept for lower threshold detection using basic Schmitt trigger topology.

Attachment 1: 40mServo_v1.pdf  198 kB  | Show | Show all
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